Trouble identifying what the coin is and what it’s made of.

goldhat

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Aug 14, 2009
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I ran my Deus II over it and it seems to be all over the place. It was minted in 1922 so my guess is AG. But, from the ID it’s hard to tell. Seems to come up as clad at times.

Odd readings but I’m still learning my machine so it could be the user 🤠

I don’t know Italian and have no idea of it’s worth or what it’s made of. Anyone have any idea of what it is fill me in.

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goldhat

goldhat

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  • #6
I doubt it at price they are asking for it, but may be. Go over there and look. I just took a glance. I think you will get several hits.
Made of Nickel. Gave me some strange reading.
 
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goldhat

goldhat

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Aug 14, 2009
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Arizona and the great southwest!
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Cool find though its different for sure, kind of cool its exactly 100 years old too

Very cool coin and very stranger. I didn’t find this one but I had it for years.

I was air testing the Deus II to learn it’s tones and ID’s and this came up really different. I’m guessing because it‘s real nickel and is a fairly large size coin. It really had some odd readings.
 

giuhalftrack

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Jul 13, 2017
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I'm Italian it's not a coin but a "BVONO" or "BUONO" with the "U" written as "V" (like ancient roman do)....
the "buono" is like a "pay check" but this in a form of token and the coin said "buono da lire 1" or token of 1 lire value.

In the past those token were minted by companies in example mines have their shops with cheap prices.. and miners were given those tokens, sometimes some of this tokens report the good, for example they have written
latte = milk or pane= bread etc.
 

Red-Coat

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Dec 23, 2019
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I'm Italian it's not a coin but a "BVONO" or "BUONO" with the "U" written as "V" (like ancient roman do)....
the "buono" is like a "pay check" but this in a form of token and the coin said "buono da lire 1" or token of 1 lire value.

In the past those token were minted by companies in example mines have their shops with cheap prices.. and miners were given those tokens, sometimes some of this tokens report the good, for example they have written
latte = milk or pane= bread etc.

Thanks giuhalftrack.

Just to clarify, the Numista listing linked above refers to this as a “standard circulation coin” which is correct, but not the full story.

Going into the First World War, Italy had silver lira coins circulating alongside paper lira but the war created financial chaos. The paper lira ceased to be backed by bullion and by the end of the war had lost a fifth of its value. Italy struggled to cover its war costs, small silver coins had progressively disappeared during the war, and by 1922 there were almost none in circulation.

The Italian government addressed the situation in 1922 by issuing coins in nickel (ie with no bullion value) bearing the “BVONO” legend as an indication that they had token value, albeit officially issued. By 1926 the lira had lost half its pre-war value and didn’t stabilise until 1927, with one pre-war lira valued at 4.7 “new lira”.

The nickel lira tokens were issued for standard circulation between 1922 - 1925 and again in 1928 but in other years only in limited numbers for numismatic collectors. Just 500 coins were struck in 1926; 100 in 1927 and then only 50 in each of the years from 1929 – 1935.
 

giuhalftrack

Jr. Member
Jul 13, 2017
51
46
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Thanks giuhalftrack.

Just to clarify, the Numista listing linked above refers to this as a “standard circulation coin” which is correct, but not the full story.

Going into the First World War, Italy had silver lira coins circulating alongside paper lira but the war created financial chaos. The paper lira ceased to be backed by bullion and by the end of the war had lost a fifth of its value. Italy struggled to cover its war costs, small silver coins had progressively disappeared during the war, and by 1922 there were almost none in circulation.

The Italian government addressed the situation in 1922 by issuing coins in nickel (ie with no bullion value) bearing the “BVONO” legend as an indication that they had token value, albeit officially issued. By 1926 the lira had lost half its pre-war value and didn’t stabilise until 1927, with one pre-war lira valued at 4.7 “new lira”.

The nickel lira tokens were issued for standard circulation between 1922 - 1925 and again in 1928 but in other years only in limited numbers for numismatic collectors. Just 500 coins were struck in 1926; 100 in 1927 and then only 50 in each of the years from 1929 – 1935.
ok, I was wrong... I was thinking the coin was some sort of token issued by companies as I explain above.
good to know thanks
 

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