what a find

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ARC

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Nuts like this were used on everything... down to construction of homes ...
even until the late 1950's for roof to block securing.

Not only have i detected many... i even have new old stock jar of em around somewhere... err i think... might have sold em at a yard sale or even given them away...

Never the less... your bolt is not IMO from a wagon just by the look / style of it...
And WAY to small to be "axel" related... ANY axel even.... let alone a wagon.
 

traveller777

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Here ares some wagon nuts.

s-l225.jpg
 

crashbandicoot

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Old timers used to talk about what they called "Sweet Iron", most of what I saw described as such was in chains,as in log chains.Hard as heck,couldn,t cut it with a hacksaw. I don,t know exactly what was in it,but thought I,d throw it in there. looked a lot like your material.
 

releventchair

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Looks like wrought iron to me.
There were square nuts used here and there on wagons. Not to hold wheels on that I know of..
The axle /wheel nuts are not square on my old one either. (If recalled correct , there are two different directional threads on the fronts. One threads on left hand and the other right.)

Front braces have square nuts. Best I can recall.
 

alloy_II

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Old timers used to talk about what they called "Sweet Iron", most of what I saw described as such was in chains,as in log chains.Hard as heck,couldn,t cut it with a hacksaw. I don,t know exactly what was in it,but thought I,d throw it in there. looked a lot like your material.
Never heard of sweet iron, perhaps you meant Pig Iron, those hard to cut chains wold have been made with a manganese alloy.

I learned the hard way that manganese is non magnetic after loading 2.5 tons of ball mill balls onto my truck. When the scrap yard magnet would not pick them off the truck was told they would not purchase them.

Manganese is used to make wear resistant steel, there's a foundry in British Colombia paying $1200.00 a ton.

The foundry uses the metal to make abrasion resistant pumps used in the mining industry.

The load I had was over forty years ago.

Screenshot from 2022-02-08 00-31-51.png
 
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lackaff

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What makes you think this is from a wagon axel ?
I climbed up the hill where they lowered wagons down it was steep and dangerous to climb up with a detector in oregon near mount hood on luarerl hill they tied chains to wagons and lowered them down lots of wagons crashed and people died
I found this on a steep slope
not sure how they got them wagons down
 
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lackaff

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I also found these old chians with the garret at ma where they lowered wagons down that steep slope on the oregon trail on lauerl hill on mount hood oregon
 

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lackaff

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Which would eplain why I found this brass snap hook there
they would tie the belt through that and the chains and lower the wagons down using this tiny brass snap hook
 

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gunsil

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You certainly have a vivid imagination! Your nut as stated is not an axle nut and does not at all look older than the real wagon axle nuts shown. The chain you show is modern chain, it was not used by any wagon trains. That brass hook likely was not used for lowering wagons either. It would have taken a long time to get a bunch of wagons lowered, there would have to be a camp top and bottom. They also cold not really lower wagons very far with ropes or chains, this is movie stuff. Find the camps and you will be in the right spot.
 
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lackaff

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here is a cast iron wagon wheel i found in google vintage with the threads but those look alot newer
 

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