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Thread: Location of Aztec Gold

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  1. #181
    Charter Member

    Jun 2004
    288
    423 times
    Quote Originally Posted by South Sea mariner View Post
    But what about Aztec treasure what did it really look like.

    here is the only picture I could find that appears to be actual Aztec treasure as most gold working was done by other cultures in region.
    Keep in mind South Sea, there would be two schools of thought on this. Much of what would be considered the Aztec Treasure was stuff that the Spanish had already taken, melted down, and then lost when trying to evacuate the Aztec capitol as they were attacked and many died when they fell into the lake and drowned. This is a very well documented event. The Spanish melted much of what they found down for sake of ease in transport so much of what the Aztec treasure would look like, is not what one would expect. It is also well documented that after the Spanish left (and before they returned to complete conquering the Aztec) that much of this gold was recovered by the Aztecs themselves. Keep in mind, the Spanish obtained the bulk of this gold while staying with the Aztec as Montezuma had them staying in his father's old place. The Spanish, while staying there, found a hidden room full of this treasure.

    This brings to mind another idea I've had that is pure speculation, but in my estimation a fairly reasonable guess. I like to think that the Aztec likely did not have all their treasure in one place. To me for a culture that size it stands to reason they likely had other caches and in all probability some of these things were moved in the space between the two Spanish occupations as well.

    If you're interested, this is a video presentation I did on the topic of the Aztec treasure a few years back. It's long and a bit dry but lays out a great deal of the information available on many sites that might be home to the treasure and the historical underpinnings of the treasure as well.

    https://youtu.be/KX3L-G4X3-w
    Presenting: Selections From the National Prospector's Gazette Volume 1: Exanimo Looks at Books
    ----------
    Randy Bradford's Buy, Sell and Trade List


    National Prospector's Gazette, Exanimo Express, Gene Ballinger Publications, 8 States Association, National Treasure Hunter's League, Gold Bug, Johnny Pounds "The Treasure Hunter," and so many more...

    Understanding our hobby, by embracing its history...

  2. #182
    us
    Jun 2012
    Garrett ADS-7X, Fisher Two Box M-Scope, Mother Lode Locator, Dowsing Model 20 Electroscope, White's TM808, White's TM900, Inground Scanners
    3,048
    4326 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    You will not find Axtec Gold in large quantities in Mexico nor Montezuma's Treasures either. All of those treasures were brought through Texas in 1867 by Jesse James and the KGC.

  3. #183
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,878
    2558 times
    That's an interesting theory I had not read before.

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    audigger53 and Real of Tayopa like this.
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  4. #184
    Charter Member

    Jun 2004
    288
    423 times
    Quote Originally Posted by franklin View Post
    You will not find Axtec Gold in large quantities in Mexico nor Montezuma's Treasures either. All of those treasures were brought through Texas in 1867 by Jesse James and the KGC.
    I hadn't heard of this one either. Care to elaborate? Anything you can share that someone could follow up on (I,e. source material)?
    Presenting: Selections From the National Prospector's Gazette Volume 1: Exanimo Looks at Books
    ----------
    Randy Bradford's Buy, Sell and Trade List


    National Prospector's Gazette, Exanimo Express, Gene Ballinger Publications, 8 States Association, National Treasure Hunter's League, Gold Bug, Johnny Pounds "The Treasure Hunter," and so many more...

    Understanding our hobby, by embracing its history...

  5. #185
    mx
    May 2010
    864
    364 times
    I don't think to Mexican archaeologists that the Coyoacan landmarks are terribly lost. For us, yes, but not for them. A couple blocks from my home in Mexico City, is a library which was in the early days of Spanish control a well known palace in the country. I read the autobiography of a woman who used to go there to dances.

    I will abandon my lengthy theory on the treasure being buried close to my house WHEN someone actually finds serious quantities of gold in another place.

    The Aztecs were brilliant military strategists, except Moctezuma II in his later days. I am not convinced they wrote down the exact locations of the gold.

    Just as I will not abandon my theory without real life evidence, I urge you all to not abandon your theories. They keep people from coming out here and bugging us. Hee, hee.

  6. #186
    mx
    May 2010
    864
    364 times
    Let's try some reverse engineering on the James gang getting all the Aztec gold.

    They travel over 800 miles from the US border. Check.

    They find the gold which has been hidden for well over 300 years, and they do it without reading any documentation in a language they can neither read nor speak. Check.

    They do all this without being bothered by a military which came close to defeating the entire US military invasion. Check.

    With a minimum of 15 tons of goodies, they happily trot back more than 800 miles to the border, finding food and drink whenever they need it. And, there is no armed resistance from people who gave the entire US military a hard time. Or, if there was, the James gang handily ran them off. Check.

    Or, they pop it on a train to the border? Did Mexico have border trains in those days? I am not sure. I know they did by 1910, because my wife's grandma was given a Singer sewing machine made in Elizabeth, NJ, in 1910 to take a sewing course. She made clothes including her son's and wife's wedding clothes in the late 1940s. My wife now owns that 106 year old machine, and it still works great.

    Then, they truck 15 or more tons of goodies clear across the state of Texas. Check.

    And, someone was observing it and wrote it down. Check.

    I endorse this theory and encourage everyone to search for that James gold wherever it is. I think it can be narrowed down to no more than 2.3 billion acres of land and water. It shouldn't take that long to find, no? Then, no one will be looking for me.

  7. #187
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,878
    2558 times
    piegrande:

    To such a theory we can apply Occam's Razor or Macco's.

    I find it very hard to believe people like Jesse James (or, for that matter, the entire Japanese army) devoted their lives to hiding treasure and leaving detailed maps because they didn't have anything better to do.

    Some people will spend their lives seeking mythical hoards of gold bullion, gold coins, or for all I know beef bouillon. They'll find it neatly tucked away in about twenty feet of hard rock, next to the Lost Confederate Treasury, the KGC loot (who apparently couldn't care less about winning the Civil War, just as long as they could hide more gold that came from somewhere or other), Captain Kidd's treasure chests and the Dutchman's gold quartz.

    Or is it gold pints?

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo, CM
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  8. #188
    mx
    May 2010
    864
    364 times
    My opinion on my local treasure involved what I call reverse engineering. What would brilliant military strategists have done. But, I have explained it in nauseating detail.

    At the same time, reverse engineering the Coyoacan treasure, brilliant military strategists would never have put the location in writing.

    If where I think it is, they didn't need to. The whole family could come out here and walk right to it, just by a simple verbal statement. "It's in the xxx room of the summer house."

    This location also is the simplest solution to hiding it. It would be much more complicated to run it all over the American Continent at risk from almost everything and everyone, and each site, if multiple sites were used, would have its own logistical problems.

    Here, two days by strong bearers, and a week of construction using items well known to be locally available, in a location known to be protected by friendly troops. Wham! Bam!Thank you, Ma'am! Everything else becomes messy and complicated.
    Last edited by piegrande; Feb 02, 2017 at 05:16 PM.
    audigger53 likes this.

 

 
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