Sliver Nickles???
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  1. #1
    AMMO (IYAAYAS)

    Nov 2006
    Arizona
    Whites DFX
    53

    Sliver Nickles???

    How does one know if it is sliver and what years where they made with sliver??
    I'll find it sooner or later with a little help from my friends

  2. #2
    us
    Aug 2007
    Delaware, USA
    Eldorado
    353
    1 times

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    Quote Originally Posted by one8orz
    How does one know if it is sliver and what years where they made with sliver??
    I think it was 1943?

  3. #3
    Kentucky Kache

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    War nickels, 1942-1945, are 35% silver.

  4. #4
    us
    Aug 2007
    Delaware, USA
    Eldorado
    353
    1 times

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    Check this link out Info on coins
    http://www.gi.alaska.edu/~jesse/trea...ins/coins.html

  5. #5
    AMMO (IYAAYAS)

    Nov 2006
    Arizona
    Whites DFX
    53

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    Thanks have to go Thur my large jar of nickles will keep you posted wish me luck
    I'll find it sooner or later with a little help from my friends

  6. #6
    robert roy

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    The information below was from "Google."
    All you have to do is go to google and type in your
    question. Google is GREAT. Try it. Many of the
    questions you ask here may not be able to be answered
    anyother way.

    Robert Roy

    Nickel

    Current Designs

    "Obverse: Since 2006, the image on the front of the nickel is the Thomas Jefferson likeness, based on a Rembrandt Peale portrait completed in 1800. The portrait showed Jefferson as Vice President at 57 years of age. This painting was the basis for most of the images of Jefferson that were made during his lifetime. The cursive "Liberty" inscription, modeled after Jefferson’s own handwriting, debuted on the 2005 nickels. This was designed by The United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program Master Designer Jamie Franki of Concord, North Carolina. It was engraved by Sculptor-Engraver Donna Weaver.

    Reverse: The reverse of the 2006 nickel features the classic rendition of Monticello originally executed by artist Felix Schlag. However, the 2006 reverse design is crisper than ever before. United States Mint engraver John Mercanti restored the original image with greater detail and relief in the dome, the balconies, and the door and windows.



    Background

    Many people refer to the five-cent coin as a nickel, but that was not always the case, as the first five-cent coin was made of silver. Then, all coins had to be made of gold, silver, or copper by law. This silver five-cent coin was called a "half disme" (pronounced like "dime"), and was much smaller than today’s nickel. Congress decided to have the United States Mint produce a new five-cent coin, made of nickel and copper, in 1866...but the silver half disme was still made until 1873. So both sizes were circulating at the same time for several years.

    The new five-cent coin was larger than the silver half disme because nickel was less expensive than silver. This larger nickel was much easier to handle than the previous diminutive silver half disme.

    President Thomas Jefferson took his place on obverse of the nickel in 1938 with Monticello, Jefferson’s Virginia home, on the reverse. These obverse and reverse designs, both by Felix Schlag, were produced until 2003. In 2004, the United States Mint began to commemorate the bicentennials of the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition with the Westward Journey Nickel Series™. The nickel’s current design is also the last of that series. "



    Specifications

    Composition:Cupro-Nickel: 25% Ni, Balance Cu
    Weight:5.000 g
    Diameter:0.835 in., 21.21 mm
    Thickness:1.95 mm
    Edge:Plain

    "Are nickels made before 1964 made of silver?
    You are getting a lost of misinformation here. Quarters and dimes were made out of 90% silver and 10% copper in 1964 and earlier.

    Nickels are normally made from a nickel alloy. During World War II nickel became "crucial to the war effort". In substitute of the nickel alloy the coins were made of 56% copper, 9% manganese and 35% silver.

    The mint mark on these coins was also moved from the obverse to the reverse and can be found located above the Monticello building.

    Also, the nickel design was the same from 1937 until 2004. You can still find silver nickels in circulation."


  7. #7
    us
    Sep 2007
    Forney, Tx
    White's XLT
    116

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    This might help

    http://www.coinfacts.com/
    From my flight instructor........
    "Push forward, houses get bigger
    Pull back, houses get smaller"

  8. #8
    robert roy

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    Also see this
    1910 BARBER DIME
    PCGS Nos: 4854, 4894

    Mintage:
    Circulation strikes: 11,520,000
    Proofs: 551

    Designer: Charles E. Barber

    Diameter: 17.9 millimeters

    Metal content:
    Silver - 90%
    Copper - 10%

    Weight: ±2.5 grams

    Edge: Reeded

    Mintmark: None (for Philadelphia) just below the wreath on the reverse
    [img][/img]
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  9. #9
    us
    Jul 2007
    berks county, pa.
    Excalibur II 1000, Xterra-70 x3, Garret ace 250,
    360
    13 times

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    The easiest way to tell if they are silver is to look on the reverse and see if the
    mint mark on 1942-45 nickels is above the dome of Monticello. The mint moved
    the mark to here to tell which ones were silver. There are some 42's with the
    mark beside the bldg. these are plain nickel.

    Joe
    Our team of 2 was assembled in 1976 and we are still swinging and digging together. I cannot go if she cannot ride shotgun. Now we just have to wait for the grandkids to get big enough to join us.

  10. #10
    us
    Mar 2007
    central ohio
    MINELAB E TRAC x 2 xp deus
    921
    16 times
    Metal Detecting

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    Quote Originally Posted by robert roy
    The information below was from "Google."
    All you have to do is go to google and type in your
    question. Google is GREAT. Try it. Many of the
    questions you ask here may not be able to be answered
    anyother way.

    Robert Roy

    Nickel

    Current Designs

    "Obverse: Since 2006, the image on the front of the nickel is the Thomas Jefferson likeness, based on a Rembrandt Peale portrait completed in 1800. The portrait showed Jefferson as Vice President at 57 years of age. This painting was the basis for most of the images of Jefferson that were made during his lifetime. The cursive "Liberty" inscription, modeled after Jefferson’s own handwriting, debuted on the 2005 nickels. This was designed by The United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program Master Designer Jamie Franki of Concord, North Carolina. It was engraved by Sculptor-Engraver Donna Weaver.

    Reverse: The reverse of the 2006 nickel features the classic rendition of Monticello originally executed by artist Felix Schlag. However, the 2006 reverse design is crisper than ever before. United States Mint engraver John Mercanti restored the original image with greater detail and relief in the dome, the balconies, and the door and windows.



    Background

    Many people refer to the five-cent coin as a nickel, but that was not always the case, as the first five-cent coin was made of silver. Then, all coins had to be made of gold, silver, or copper by law. This silver five-cent coin was called a "half disme" (pronounced like "dime"), and was much smaller than today’s nickel. Congress decided to have the United States Mint produce a new five-cent coin, made of nickel and copper, in 1866...but the silver half disme was still made until 1873. So both sizes were circulating at the same time for several years.

    The new five-cent coin was larger than the silver half disme because nickel was less expensive than silver. This larger nickel was much easier to handle than the previous diminutive silver half disme.

    President Thomas Jefferson took his place on obverse of the nickel in 1938 with Monticello, Jefferson’s Virginia home, on the reverse. These obverse and reverse designs, both by Felix Schlag, were produced until 2003. In 2004, the United States Mint began to commemorate the bicentennials of the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition with the Westward Journey Nickel Series™. The nickel’s current design is also the last of that series. "



    Specifications

    Composition:Cupro-Nickel: 25% Ni, Balance Cu
    Weight:5.000 g
    Diameter:0.835 in., 21.21 mm
    Thickness:1.95 mm
    Edge:Plain

    "Are nickels made before 1964 made of silver?
    You are getting a lost of misinformation here. Quarters and dimes were made out of 90% silver and 10% copper in 1964 and earlier.

    Nickels are normally made from a nickel alloy. During World War II nickel became "crucial to the war effort". In substitute of the nickel alloy the coins were made of 56% copper, 9% manganese and 35% silver.

    The mint mark on these coins was also moved from the obverse to the reverse and can be found located above the Monticello building.

    Also, the nickel design was the same from 1937 until 2004. You can still find silver nickels in circulation."

    I did not see any misinformation.Silver war nickles as they have been called for a long time were made during ww2 as you stated and i dont think anyone said differently in answer to his specific question.
    teverly

  11. #11
    us
    Oct 2007
    Hesperia, MI
    Minelab Explorer XS & Explorer II, Fisher 1236-X2
    813
    60 times
    Metal Detecting

    Re: Sliver Nickles???

    I made some War Nickel comments on another post, which I copied and pasted to this thread....so here's what I know about War Nickels:

    During WW2 from 1942 to 1945, Nickel was needed for the war effort. So was copper, hence the 1943 Steel Penny. Nickels during those years were minted in an alloy composed of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese. They can be identified by the mintmark being above the dome of Monticello on the reverse. Incidentally, these nickels were the first coins to ever bear the "P" mintmark of Philadelphia.

    Something else on wartime coins too. You may have noticed that 1944-1946 Wheaties act differently on some detectors than other pre-1982 copper pennies. This is because the planchets were made from recycled shell casings and the composition was 95% copper and 5% zinc as opposed to the normal composition used from 1864 to 1982 of 95% copper , 5% tin AND zinc.

    Another interesting fact about nickels...The Nickel is the ONLY U.S. coin to maintain the same composition, weight, thickness, and diameter throughout it's ENTIRE existence (except for WW2) from 1866 to now.


    Hope this helps,
    -SgtSki
    "There comes a time in every rightly constructed boy's life when he has a raging desire to go somewhere and dig for hidden treasure." - Mark Twain, "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer"

 

 

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