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Thread: Echos From Lost Mines - J.D. Hill (Overland Monthly & Out West Magazine - 1924)

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  1. #16
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11706 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Oro, bookaro, thanks for that Flipper artice and I agree, threads are similar to a campfire settings, relaxed.
    UncleMatt likes this.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  2. #17
    Charter Member
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,599
    1939 times
    Rd3T: "Oro" - I like that. Some years ago I had drinks with "Frogfoot" Weller and his charming wife, and their toast was always "Mas oro!"

    To me the real test of a good thread is the number of responses. Views are nice, and thanks to the good people on TN I've had tens of thousands. But it's the conversation that counts. And that means the talk takes some twists and turns. That's one of the great things about the Internet. As my Dad used to say, we can have a nice visit.

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  3. #18

    Jan 2006
    Colorado/San Carlos, Sonora,Mexico
    11
    3 times

    W.C.Jameson

    Who is W.C. Jameson?? His prolific collection of stories in some cases look to be inspired by some of the tales on Treasurenet........

  4. #19
    Charter Member
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,599
    1939 times
    ruggertug:

    In my personal opinion, W.C. Jameson is a poser - he claims to have been a successful treasure hunter, but has no evidence to back it up. His books are full of twice-told tales, many with errors and mistakes. He often provides no sources (although anyone familiar with the literature can easily discern where many of these yarns originated) - and when he does, they are often just treasure hunting magazine articles.

    He stated he has been elected to the Professional Treasure Hunter's Hall of Fame. The idea that "professional treasure hunters" would find it helpful to have their names broadcast shows a certain lack of knowledge. I'm thinking the CIA's anonymous gold stars on the wall would be more appropriate.

    Perhaps better researchers than I can actual find this Hall of Fame. It isn't very famous.

    The claim reminds me of KvonM's comments about characters at treasure shows who dress up and tell the gullible they are pros.

    This Treasure Hunter book would be laughable if it weren't so sad. He's a mix between F.L. Coffman and Lieut. Harry Rieseberg (claiming to be a successful professional) and Thomas Penfield (an aggregator or scraper of the work of previous writers).

    As you can, perhaps, tell, I'm not a fan of his work.

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    Last edited by Old Bookaroo; Jul 27, 2015 at 08:38 AM.
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  5. #20
    us
    Bill Riley

    Dec 2006
    Tucson, Az
    1,428
    1730 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Buckaroo,

    WC helped on National Treasure I have a letter from him basically stating buy more of my books and a price list for it. I called him after the movie came out.

    Your right he was believing his own fictional tales and was grinning at the time he was voted the worlds most professional treasure hunter by National Treasure you know, the contest they had or something like that.

    I was questioning him with regards to the first National Treasure movie as someone on the writing team had been gleaming idea's from some of mine and others postings on Treasure Net. He told me he was just a low level guy and they wouldn't allow him full writing privilege's on the team.
    He was however a bit nervous about it when I questioned him. But, he was indeed,

    "A Legend in his own Mind".





    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    ruggertug:

    In my personal opinion, W.C. Jameson is a poser - he claims to have been a successful treasure hunter, but has no evidence to back it up. His books are full of twice-told tales, many with errors and mistakes. He often provides no sources (although anyone familiar with the literature can easily discern where many of these yarns originated) - and when he does, they are often just treasure hunting magazine articles.

    He stated he has been elected to the Professional Treasure Hunter's Hall of Fame. The idea that "professional treasure hunters" would find it helpful to have their names broadcast shows a certain lack of knowledge. I'm thinking the CIA's anonymous gold stars on the wall would be more appropriate.

    Perhaps better researchers than I can actual find this Hall of Fame. It isn't very famous.

    The claim reminds me of KvonM's comments about characters at treasure shows who dress up and tell the gullible they are pros.

    This Treasure Hunter book would be laughable if it weren't so sad. He's a mix between F.L. Coffman and Lieut. Harry Rieseberg (claiming to be a successful professional) and Thomas Penfield (an aggregator or scraper of the work of previous writers).

    As you can, perhaps, tell, I'm not a fan of his work.

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    Old Bookaroo and lastleg like this.

  6. #21
    us
    Bill Riley

    Dec 2006
    Tucson, Az
    1,428
    1730 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    The Adams diggings very closely resembles a box canyon full of gold in the Catalina Mountains that I've been to and have photo's of my journey which almost ended with a Rattle Snake bite!. The true Canyon of Gold is not just on the west side of the mountain range. There are large deposits of gold on three sides of the range and inside the huge canada del oro. I've trekked all over those mountains and all the nearby ranges in my hiking / backpacking 4x4 travels.

    Lots of mining all around. But, the box canyon that I dry washed in the Catalina's was a pretty large score if you had the time to defend your self from the most numerous hoards along the crevasse walls of Killer Bee's I've ever seen in my life! My wife and I walked through a sea of Rattlers to get there then repelled down with your gear on a rotten rope while hoping the rope doesn't snap why yes, you may take some gold out if your lucky enough to get back up the old cowboy rope with out disturbing the bees nests. Be careful though, the Thunder God will get ya if your caught in a monsoon in that high mountain crevasse! Better watch out and wear a large brimmed hat you may end up with a rattler on your head while your mining the rich hoard. You can have it. We have not been back yet. We tried it two times and it has enough gold to make it profitable. We're looking for the source of the gold because as you know its stays close to home.

    Were attempting a third expo up there this winter I going to film it this time on HD Video.



    It fit's both the Iron Door Legend and the lost Adams Diggings.

  7. #22
    Charter Member
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,599
    1939 times
    Bill Riley:

    In W.C. Jameson's book The Silver Madonna and Other Tales of America's Greatest Lost Treasures (2013) he retells the story of the "Four Corners Gold Act" plant. He states a crop-duster was hired to fly the gold bullion from Mexico to the USA - with about a ton of gold carried on each trip.

    Why would anyone hire a crop-duster for this job? How much of a load could a crop-dusting airplane possibly carry? This author wants the reader to believe a ton!

    Isn't the entire cargo space taken up with the tanks used to hold the pesticide and the equipment to disburse it?

    I could see hiring a crop-dusting pilot. Perhaps. But his airplane?

    This is just one of the endless available examples of stories in his books that, to me, just defy common sense and logic.


    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    Last edited by Old Bookaroo; Jul 30, 2015 at 09:51 AM.
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  8. #23
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11706 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Ole Bookarooo you posted ___Why would anyone hire a crop-duster for this job?

    sheesh yer prejudiced , sniff. Crop Dusting / fumigating is very precision flying work, used to flying out of makshift airfields. Strict Dept of Agricuture rules, not the round heeled, whte scarfed, devil may care adventurer that most visulize.
    Last edited by Real de Tayopa Tropical Tramp; Jul 29, 2015 at 05:51 PM.
    Oroblanco and lastleg like this.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  9. #24
    Charter Member
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,599
    1939 times
    Rd3T: Nope. I asked why anyone would hire a crop-dusting airplane to haul gold bullion. At a ton a trip.

    I wrote I could see hiring an experienced pilot - but where in a 1930's crop-duster (a Cessna, I believe) is there room for any more cargo than a box lunch?

    As for the white scarf on the pilot, I would think that could get dangerous. Remember what happened to Isadora Duncan?

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  10. #25
    Charter Member
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,599
    1939 times
    Oroblanco:

    You are a gentleman and a scholar - and I appreciate your good manners and good taste.

    I did not know the originator of the thread has special powers - I will publicly commit to always use mine for good and never for evil.

    I am searching for a copy of that back issue of Western (and Eastern) Treasures we corresponded about a while ago. I'm about to order a back issue of Lost Treasure Magazine - there's an article in it about treasure hunting literature and I can't find any of my copies...

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  11. #26
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11706 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hi Buckaroo The only rear wheel on an aircraft is the tiny one under the rudder. As for only carrying a ton of gold at time, I find no problem with that.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  12. #27
    mt
    Sep 2014
    1,694
    4201 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    Bill Riley:

    In W.C. Jameson's book The Silver Madonna and Other Tales of America's Greatest Lost Treasures (2013) he retells the story of the "Four Corners Gold Act" plant. He states a crop-duster was hired to fly the gold bullion from Mexico to the USA - with about a ton of gold carried on each trip.

    Why would anyone hire a crop-duster for this job? How much of a load could a crop-dusting airplane possibly carry? This author wants the reader to believe a ton!

    Isn't the entire cargo space taken up with the tanks used to hold the pesticide and the equipment to disburse it?

    I could see hiring a crop-dusting pilot. Perhaps. But his airplane?

    This is just one of the endless available examples of stories in his books that, to me, just defy common sense and logic.


    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    I believe that most or all of the 1930s crop dusters were lightweight biplanes - either WWI surplus or later. They usually had a payload, including the pilot, of about 600 pounds, more or less. Even Lindbergh's de Havilland mail delivery plane maxed out at 1,000 pounds payload. Jameson, like so many other "treasure writers", made up a lot of the details up as he needed them to fit the story.

  13. #28

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,478
    4425 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    Rd3T: Nope. I asked why anyone would hire a crop-dusting airplane to haul gold bullion. At a ton a trip.

    I wrote I could see hiring an experienced pilot - but where in a 1930's crop-duster (a Cessna, I believe) is there room for any more cargo than a box lunch?

    As for the white scarf on the pilot, I would think that could get dangerous. Remember what happened to Isadora Duncan?

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo
    O.B.,

    As I recall, Duncan broke her neck when her driver took off too fast? Course my memory aint so good these days.

    Take care,

    Joe
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  14. #29
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11706 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Nah Joe, it seems that her 'long scarf' got wrapped up in the drivers rear wheel and broke her neck.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  15. #30

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,478
    4425 times
    Like I said, my memory ain't so good no more.

    Take care,

    Joe
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

 

 
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