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Thread: How deep is your silver?

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  1. #1
    us
    Apr 2018
    Plymouth, WI
    Etrac, F2, F44
    30
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    Metal Detecting

    How deep is your silver?

    Guys,
    I was out for several hours today and broke a silver drought with a ‘46 Rosie at about 8” on a bouncy iffy signal on the Etrac. I hit a 12-45 once in my swings but mostly bounced with only a few 45’s. I dug it and new it was silver as soon as my pin pointer placed it in the center of the hole. Question... can you guys tell me the average depth of your silvers and what type of dirt your digging? I pulled this one at 8” in black soil but my usual silvers come in about 4”-6” and most of that is in clay under an Inch or 2 of topsoil.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Timebandit; May 06, 2018 at 07:20 PM.
    buck8point likes this.

  2. #2
    Charter Member
    us
    I'm a greater believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it” ― Thomas Jefferson

    Apr 2016
    Abita Springs....Born in New Orleans
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    Yeah I have to deal with this Louisiana clay myself.
    buck8point and Normsel like this.

  3. #3

    Jul 2014
    76
    57 times
    That's a tough question. My shallowest, a Rosie right on the surface without a grain of sand on it, the deepest, a standing Liberty 12 inches down in boggy dark soil.

  4. #4
    us
    Apr 2018
    Plymouth, WI
    Etrac, F2, F44
    30
    50 times
    Metal Detecting
    12”....that’s deep. What kind of machine did you hit that one with?

  5. #5
    us
    Jul 2011
    699
    452 times
    I have to deal with the sandy soil in Florida. It gobbles up coins & many are gone forever. I have dug so many coins that date in the 1960's, & they are already 8-10" deep !
    Divine Profit likes this.

  6. #6
    us
    Jul 2017
    The Old North State
    Equinox 600 Tesoro Cutlass Bounty Hunter Tracker II
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptEsteban View Post
    I have to deal with the sandy soil in Florida. It gobbles up coins & many are gone forever. I have dug so many coins that date in the 1960's, & they are already 8-10" deep !
    This post brings up a question that I know has no definite answer. I’d there a general rule for estimating sink rate in various soil types?
    ---------------------
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  7. #7
    us
    Detectorist

    Apr 2018
    Iberville Parish, Louisiana
    Garrett ACE 250 / Garrett AT Max / Garrett Pro Pointer / Garrett Pro Pointer AT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Truth1253 View Post
    Yeah I have to deal with this Louisiana clay myself.
    Yea.. Me too....
    Must be highly Alkaline cuz it just eats coins up.. most come out in just horrible shape.. new pennies barely last a year or two and dissolve like an alka-seltzer... lol
    Last edited by buck8point; May 07, 2018 at 03:02 PM. Reason: Adding Note
    Timebandit likes this.

  8. #8
    us
    Oct 2009
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    There is no real answer to your question. First, if someones detector can only see a coin 4 inches deep in their soil, thats the deepest you are going to get as an answer. Next, a different detector may be capable of 12 inches in that same part of the country.

    Now, to make it even more confusing, the "depth of silver" changes dramatically over very short distances. I have a site where silver and other coins lost as far back the founding of my town in 1893 have been 18" deep and there there could be more deeper still. Yet a few blocks away I recover silver and similar dates coins at all depths including sitting on the surface.

    Plant growth, irrigation, fertilization, mowing practices, shade trees, freeze and thaw cycles and other factors all play a role in how deep targets get before we dig them.

  9. #9
    us
    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by buck8point View Post
    Yea.. Me too....
    Must be highly Alkaline cuz it just eats coins up.. most come out in just horrible shape.. new pennies barely last a year or two and dissolve like an alka-seltzer... lol
    Thats not the soil, its just the nature of the shitty one cent coins produced at the mint.

  10. #10
    us
    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringtyer View Post
    This post brings up a question that I know has no definite answer. I’d there a general rule for estimating sink rate in various soil types?
    Coins dont sink. Soil is not a liquid medium. Coins can be pushed down, but mainly they are covered by decaying plant matter, dirt, sand, etc. This is why the vigorous the the turf grasses grow in a spot, the faster that coins reach their nominal depths. Look at the depths of coins in forested areas where the ground has almost no turf grasses. As a rule, barren ground have very shallow coins and fertilized and irrigated "lawns" have much, much deeper coins.

  11. #11
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason in Enid View Post
    Coins dont sink. Soil is not a liquid medium. Coins can be pushed down, but mainly they are covered by decaying plant matter, dirt, sand, etc. This is why the vigorous the the turf grasses grow in a spot, the faster that coins reach their nominal depths. Look at the depths of coins in forested areas where the ground has almost no turf grasses. As a rule, barren ground have very shallow coins and fertilized and irrigated "lawns" have much, much deeper coins.
    I respectfully disagree. Soil very much takes on a fluid state, especially after a rain, it can be so saturated as to be equal parts water and soil. Think of it as throwing your coin in a bowl of grits, mud, oatmeal, cherry pie, jelly filled donut filling, fresh cow dung, a good old chocolate malt, wet sandy beach, etc etc. Also, dry soil is lighter and less dense then a coin of copper, silver or gold. Heavier metals will thus sink lower and lower given temperature changes, frost heaving, freezing and thawing cycles, not to mention rain which changes the density and fluidity several times a year. Throw in worms and other burrowing subjects and coins will sink, even if no debris or organic matter is ever deposited on top.
    Normsel likes this.

  12. #12
    us
    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoDeep View Post
    I respectfully disagree. Soil very much takes on a fluid state, especially after a rain, it can be so saturated as to be equal parts water and soil. Think of it as throwing your coin in a bowl of grits, mud, oatmeal, cherry pie, jelly filled donut filling, fresh cow dung, a good old chocolate malt, wet sandy beach, etc etc. Also, dry soil is lighter and less dense then a coin of copper, silver or gold. Heavier metals will thus sink lower and lower given temperature changes, frost heaving, freezing and thawing cycles, not to mention rain which changes the density and fluidity several times a year. Throw in worms and other burrowing subjects and coins will sink, even if no debris or organic matter is ever deposited on top.
    Nope, completely wrong. Coins are denser than rocks and concrete, so according to your reality a coins will sink through the sidewalk too. Soil is also NOT liquid because it rains. Water in the rain moves between particulate spaces as it drains. The soil particulates do NOT becomes suspended in the water. If soil became liquid because it rained then 90% of the buildings in the world would have sunk. AND they would have sunk after the first rain after being built.

  13. #13
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason in Enid View Post
    Nope, completely wrong. Coins are denser than rocks and concrete, so according to your reality a coins will sink through the sidewalk too. Soil is also NOT liquid because it rains. Water in the rain moves between particulate spaces as it drains. The soil particulates do NOT becomes suspended in the water. If soil became liquid because it rained then 90% of the buildings in the world would have sunk. AND they would have sunk after the first rain after being built.
    Buildings have deep footings, which often extend to bedrock or to gravel to prevent sinking or the soil is heavily compacted. A building built on just soil will sink, lean and have uneven floors. Also, soil very much becomes an effectual liquid state(I believe the technical term is plasticity), a good visual example is a landslide, wheareas the soil literally flows.

    Also, a coin won't go through concrete despite being denser due to concrete being a bonded solid unaffected by water. Just because something is denser, doesn't mean it can't support something more dense. Soil's particles will separate as they are not bonded to each other and can be pushed aside, whereas, concrete or a rock won't.
    Last edited by GoDeep; May 07, 2018 at 04:14 PM.

  14. #14
    us
    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoDeep View Post
    Buildings have deep footings, which often extend to bedrock or to gravel to prevent sinking or the soil is heavily compacted.
    No, they don't. Footings are deep enough to not suffer from frost heave. Again, the vast majority of all buildings are built on pure soil, no bedrock, yet these building haven't sunk in hundreds of years. Strange.... its as if the soil is actually compact enough to support the load, and NOT becoming liquid every time it rains.

    What good would gravel do? It's denser than the soil, so it would sink, just like the building on top of it.... except none of it is really sinking
    Timebandit likes this.

  15. #15
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
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    Soil very much can effectively become a liquid state.

    Heres a further brief read for you on how plasticity of soil is determined and how it too becomes a liquid state when excess water is present:


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atterberg_limits
    Last edited by GoDeep; May 07, 2018 at 04:23 PM.
    Normsel likes this.

 

 
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