Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns
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  1. #1

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    I'm starting a new thread on this so I'll have the ability to add key words, which I'm not able to do on the other ghost town thread because I didn't begin it. Seems silly to go to all the trouble of putting this online if it can't be found on search engines. Needs key words for that.

    Cross Reference to other Ghost Towns in New Mexico thread:

    A few ghost town locations around your state
    http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.p...,158264.0.html
    http://snipurl.com/2aepd [forum_treasurenet_com]


    La Parda wild and wooly ghost town link:
    http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.p...,159240.0.html
    http://snipurl.com/2afji [forum_treasurenet_com]

    _________________________________________________

    [size=12pt]Taiban - Virgin territory for metal detectorists and relic seekers[/size]

    February 1944 the town was obliterated when a munitions train on a siding exploded. As a kid in the 1950s I used to pester the folks every time we passed through there to stop and let me pick around in the debris.

    Today nobody much knows about what happened there. Just another dusty place along the highway. Probably there's never been a metal detector passed over it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiban%2C_New_Mexico
    http://snipurl.com/2a4ec [en_wikipedia_org]

    http://www.roadsidethoughts.com/nm/taiban.htm
    http://snipurl.com/2a4eg [www_roadsidethoughts_com]

    http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/s...y/Feb1944S.htm
    http://snipurl.com/2a4ei [www_aviationarchaeology_com]

    440205 AT-17C 42-13821 1148TEFTS Ft Sumner AAF, Ft Sumner, NM TACGC 3 Borron, Lee E USA NM Taiban Aux Field, NM

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  2. #2
    us
    Jul 2005
    New Mexico
    White's XLT
    3,808
    20 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Taiban's only about 50 miles west of where I am, in Clovis. I've driven through before, and there's a few homes there still. Nice dusty little New Mexico town.
    We all know there's no such thing as a "hunted out" location. Let's stop using that phrase to describe a park out of which you just dug a pile of coins! Obviously that particular place wasn't "hunted out", right?

  3. #3

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Quote Originally Posted by af1733
    Taiban's only about 50 miles west of where I am, in Clovis. I've driven through before, and there's a few homes there still. Nice dusty little New Mexico town.
    Thanks for the reply. Clovis is plenty close enough to make a day-outing. Hope you'll tell a bit about it here if you run a coil over a few of those houses that never got rebuilt.

    Gracias,
    Jack

  4. #4

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Bosque Redondo - Old Fort Sumner Debacle relic possibilities


    Whatever a person might think about the 1862-1864 Navajo wars caused by their taking advantage of the Civil War emphasis on troops in the East, their depredations, raiding, killing and running off 160,000 livestock in 1862-63, the Long March to Bosque Redondo, the Navajo being allowed to slaughter of a great percentage of the Mescalero who were placed into that 40 square mile area with them, the area surrounding the old Rez site and old Fort Sumner site offer metal detectorists an area that might turn up some interesting finds.

    Ground zero of both places is protected by park-status, but as with every other similar site there's going to be a shadow of remnants scattered throughout the area.

    Short history of the Mescalero and Navajo wars that led to the Bosque Redondo/Fort Sumner debacle

    http://snipurl.com/2a9x1 [en_wikipedia_org]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kit_Carson

    Bosque Redondo - Fort Sumner

    On October 31, 1862, Congress authorized the establishment of the military Fort Sumner at Bosque Redondo, to protect a new Indian Reservation on a pace forty miles square.

    http://www.legendsofamerica.com/NA-NavajoLongWalk.html
    http://snipurl.com/2a5aa [www_legendsofamerica_com]

    http://www.legendsofamerica.com/NM-FortSumner.html
    http://snipurl.com/2a5ad [www_legendsofamerica_com]

    http://www.museumeducation.org/onlin...05&photoID=045
    http://snipurl.com/2a5af [www_museumeducation_org]
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  5. #5
    us
    Jul 2005
    New Mexico
    White's XLT
    3,808
    20 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Wow! Great research! I never knew a lot of Fort Sumner's history. I have thought about going hunting around the Lake Sumner area and found out then it was protected, so that kind of put a damper of things. Guess I'll have to make a run up there and look around, see if any adjoining lands to the state park have potential.
    We all know there's no such thing as a "hunted out" location. Let's stop using that phrase to describe a park out of which you just dug a pile of coins! Obviously that particular place wasn't "hunted out", right?

  6. #6

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Quote Originally Posted by af1733
    Wow! Great research! I never knew a lot of Fort Sumner's history. I have thought about going hunting around the Lake Sumner area and found out then it was protected, so that kind of put a damper of things. Guess I'll have to make a run up there and look around, see if any adjoining lands to the state park have potential.
    AF1733: Good luck. If you study the pic with the Mescalero dwellings you'll see there's enough terrain shown to provide you with plenty of reference points that ought to still be there so's you can nail the location. If it's not part of the protected portion of the land you might find yourself on something good.

    That dark smoke in the sky right-of-center suggests there might be a lot of cook-fires toward the back of the canyon, as well. I can't tell from the pic what the stuff is near the bottom of the canyon entrance on the left side, but it also might be something.

    Thanks for the interest and reply.

    Jack

  7. #7

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Colfax Ghost Town NE of Cimarron

    There wasn't a lot left of Colfax the last time I was up that way. The hotel was gutted and the schoolhouse in pretty bad shape. But the railroad-car houses were still fun nosing around in. I doubt there was ever much money a person might lose there, but a detectorist might check out around the front of the hotel and the garage.
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    hvacker likes this.

  8. #8
    us
    Dec 2007
    Las Cruces
    Minelab X-Terra 50/ Minelab Etrac
    26

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Thanks for posting all of the info Highmountain! You should write a book. You have good information on places that most of us have never heard of.

  9. #9

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Quote Originally Posted by jones791
    Thanks for posting all of the info Highmountain! You should write a book. You have good information on places that most of us have never heard of.
    Hi Jones. Thanks for the reply.

    I'm an old guy and I've traveled up a lot of dirt roads and climbed/unclimbed a lot of mountains and canyon walls in my life. A man would have to close his eyes not to come across a lot of interesting and fascinating places. I'm sort of cursed with a desire to know more about the places I come across, so I generally research as much as I'm able to learn more about them.

    I don't expect to be writing anymore books. It ain't worth the trouble and heartache. No sooner write a book and have it out there where people can read it and a writer learns all manner of things he wishes he'd put into it.

    Lost Adams Diggings Ex Post Facto
    http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.p...,156992.0.html
    http://snipurl.com/2ajdh [forum_treasurenet_com]

    Gracias,
    Jack

  10. #10

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Not much left at Mount Riley. However, if you get tired of detecting the ruins of the 1912 Pancho Villa raid on the vacant lots in Columbus and want some solitude you might drive 30 miles east to the old Mount Riley site. It never amounted to much so it didn't have much to lose when everyone went somewhere else. Old store might turn a nickle or some silver.

    I'd advise putting the coordinates into the GPS or you might drive by without seeing it.

    Regarding the nearby abandoned airfield the following will give you a better idea of what is/was there on the ground:

    http://members.tripod.com/airfields_...M_SW.htm#riley

    Mount Riley Intermediate Field, Mount Riley, NM

    31.8 North / 107.07 West (West of El Paso, TX)


    "Mount Riley (CAA)", as depicted on the 1949 El Paso Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

    Photo of the airfield while in use has not been located.


    This remote airfield located along the Mexican border

    was built as one of the Department of Commerce's network of Intermediate Fields,

    which were constructed in the 1930s along airways in between major cities

    for the emergency use of commercial aircraft.


    The date of construction of the Mount Riley airfield has not been determined.

    The earliest reference to the field which has been located

    was in the 1934 Department of Commerce Airfield Directory (according to Chris Kennedy),

    which described Mount Riley as Site 68 along the San Diego - El Paso airway.

    It was said to have three sod runways in an "L" shape, with the longest being the 3,600' east/west strip.



    The designation of the field had apparently changed within the next few years,

    as the Airport Directory Company's 1938 Airfield Directory (according to Chris Kennedy)

    listed Mount Riley as Site 37 along the Phoenix - El Paso airway.



    "Mount Riley (CAA)" was still depicted as an active airfield

    on the 1949 El Paso Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



    The Mount Riley Intermediate Field was apparently closed at some point between 1949-62,

    as it was not listed in the 1962 AOPA Airport Directory.


    The airfield was not depicted at all on USGS topo maps from 1974 or 1981.

    However, the cleared area of the airfield was depicted (although not labeled) on the 1985 USGS topo map.


    As seen in the 1996 USGS aerial photo,

    the desert climate & lack of development in the southwestern US

    generally results in a former airfield still remaining in a remarkably intact state of preservation,

    and that is the case with Mount Riley.

    The outline of the three former runways is still completely recognizable,

    as the land within the former airfield remains noticeably more clear of scrub than the surrounding property.

    There are no traces of any former buildings at the site.


    Lloyd Sumner reported in 2004, "I first discovered this airstrip a couple of years ago

    by looking at an aerial photograph of the area.

    I noticed an unusual pattern in the desert that looked like an airstrip to me.

    I have been in this area many times before & never saw anything resembling an airfield.

    My curiosity got the best of me & I drove out to the site to look around.

    I followed a primitive road heading south from the old town of Mount Riley,

    a ghost town along the abandoned El Paso & Southwestern Railroad.

    Off this road is a side road almost totally overgrown with shrubs

    and no indication that anyone has traveled that road in many years.

    About 100 yards down the road I came to the northern point of the north/south runway & parked the truck."



    "After walking around for a bit,

    I found a concrete foundation painted red with angle iron set in the concrete & cut off at ground level.

    This used to be the base of a beacon tower.

    I also found several pieces of broken concrete, also painted red.

    Piecing these together, they form a huge arrow, once used to point out the direction of the air route.

    A few other concrete foundations were in the immediate area,

    including what looked like a foundation to a generator house.

    Many tin oilcans, part to an old 4-cylinder engine & other rubbish were strewn around the surrounding desert."


    "I walked around south along the north/south runway

    and noticed that about every 100 yards were a series of short poles,

    similar to a fence post were set in the ground.

    There were about 10 of these poles set about 20 feet apart.

    Another 100 yards down the runway was another series of these poles.

    This continued all the way around the perimeter of the airfield.

    In the surrounding desert around each of these series of poles I found several old light bulbs (25 watt Westinghouse).

    At the south end of the north/south runway I found several empty 55 gallon drums."


    "I also found the site of one of the navigation beacons used to mark this airway.

    It is on a hill about 10 miles west of the Mount Riley airstrip.

    The beacon is on top of a 50-foot hill.

    The foundation of the beacon tower is identical to the foundation I found at the Mount Riley airstrip.

    At the base of the hill is a stone structure with concrete mounting blocks

    that apparently used to secure a gasoline motor & generator.

    In the side of the hill are several telephone poles were once used to carry the electrical wires to the tower.

    All sorts of rubble, broken light bulbs, fuse blocks, wires, etc. can be found at the top of the hill.

    Portions of a concrete arrow are near the generator house at the bottom of the hill."



    Clifford Bossie visited the site of the Mt. Riley Airfield in 2005.

    He reported: “From the air the outline is clear, but from the ground it is a lot harder to find.

    It appears that when the field was 'graded' the grading did little more than remove the vegetation.

    It is by no means flat.

    But I guess in the days it was built & aircraft reliability was an iffy proposition

    it would look pretty good to a pilot in distress.

    A landing there might damage the airplane, but there was a good probability of survival.”


    A 2005 photo by Clifford Bossie of the boundary posts at Mt. Riley.

    According to Clifford, “The posts that Mr. Sumner describes in his text were to hold the field boundary markers.

    It is possible that the light bulbs he mentions in his text were used to light those markers.

    I found no evidence of any field lighting.

    This was a very primitive field.

    I suspect that the boundary markers were removed for scrap during WWII

    and also suspect that the field had been long abandoned by then.”



    A 2005 photo by Clifford Bossie of foundations at the site of the Mt. Riley Airfield.


    Clifford continued, “The foundations on the Northeast corner of the field are still very noticeable,

    and in fact that was the first indication that I had managed to reach the right location.

    I would hazard a guess that the two large concrete block held the fuel tank(s),

    the lower portion the generator shack,

    and the red concrete pad still has the cutoff legs for the beacon as Mr. Sumner describes.

    The red concrete is actually a thin layer of red colored (or dyed) concrete, not painted, layed on top of the beacon foundation.

    The whole area around this foundation has had an outline of caliche rocks forming a box,

    kind of like you used to see on Army bases around barracks.

    There are a couple of smaller boxes that I can only guess the purpose of.

    The air route navigation arrow is outside of this boxed area.”


    A 2005 photo by Clifford Bossie of foundations at the site of the Mt. Riley Airfield.


    Clifford continued, “The airfield is about 2-3 miles away from the Mt. Riley Railroad station

    and about a mile South of NM Highway 9.

    I do not think the airfield was manned around the clock, if at all.

    There does not appear to have been any other structures than the area for the generator & beacon.

    My personal belief is that any caretaker lived at the El Paso & South Western's Mt. Riley station,

    or more likely that the railroad was contracted to maintain it.

    I did not see any evidence of telephone poles,

    so I don't know how a pilot making an emergency landing could contact anyone afterwards.

    Radios were not all that common.”


    A 2006 aerial photo by Clifford Bossie looking southeast at the remains of the former runways at Mt. Riley.


    The site of Mount Riley Intermediate Field is located one mile southeast of the town of Mount Riley,

    directly along the Mexican border.


    Thanks to Chris Kennedy for pointing out this field


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  11. #11

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Railroad Stops - I don't have personal knowledged of several of these but they came up in various websearches and the descriptions include coordinates for those difficult to locate:

    Altair
    Bowen
    Pelea
    Hachita
    Mastodon
    Old Hachita
    Noria
    Minero
    Potrillo
    Playas
    Mount
    Riley
    Rodeo
    Monument
    Malpais

    Ghosts of the Southline
    http://home.swbell.net/lwsumner/ghosts.htm

    Ghosts of the Southline Artifacts
    http://home.swbell.net/lwsumner/artifacts.htm


    Detailed List of Towns and Landmarks along the El Paso and Southwestern Railroad
    between El Paso, Texas and Douglas, Arizona
    ----------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------

    Listed below are all towns and significant landmarks that were located on the portion of the "Southline" between El Paso, TX and Douglas, AZ. Most of this information was obtained from either U.S. Geological Survey maps (mostly from the older 15 minute series) and from other old maps. Mileage and elevation figures were obtained from USGS topographic maps.

    ----------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------

    Topographic Maps and
    Aerial Photographs by




    El Paso, Texas - El Paso County - Elev. 3,710
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: El Paso TX - 7.5 min. series 1955
    31°46'01.52"N 106°28'42.78"W
    4.2 miles east of Rio Grande Bridge

    Bridge over the Rio Grande River - Elev. 3,736
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Smeltertown TX/NM - 7.5 min. series 1955 - T29S-R4E-Section15
    31°47'13.53"N 106°31'35.93"W
    New Mexico / Texas State Line in center of River
    0.9 miles east of Bowen Tunnel (mileage from center of river)
    4.2 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Bowen Tunnel - Dona Ana County - Elev. 3,860
    USGS: Smeltertown TX/NM - 7.5 min. series 1955 - T29S-R4E-Section9 & 16
    31°47'34.15"N 106°32'26.01"W
    The tunnel was later opened up to form the Bowen Cut. 0.2 mileseast of Bowen (mileage from center of tunnel)
    0.9 miles west of Rio GrandeRiver
    5.1 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Bowen ,New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 3,858
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Smeltertown TX/NM - 7.5 min. series 1955 - T29S-R4E-Section9
    31°47'39.61"N 106°32'40.12"W
    On north side of Sierra De Cristo Rey (former Rodadero Peak)
    1.9 miles east of Pelea
    0.2 miles west of Bowen Tunnel
    5.3 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Pelea (Anapra),New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 3,848
    (SeeTopographic map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Smeltertown TX/NM - 7.5 min. series 1955 - T29S-R4E-Section18
    31°47'01.99"N 106°34'00.08"W
    Right of way meets the Mexican border at this point. Track is adjacent to SP tracks at this point, crossovers exist. Track starts climbing outof the Rio Grande Valley.
    8.7 miles east of Mastodon
    1.9 miles west of Bowen
    7.5 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Western rim of Rio Grande Valley - Elev. 4,100
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    31°49'35.06"N 106°39'10.06"W
    Eastbound trains begin their decent into the Rio Grande Valleyat this point.
    3.0 miles east of Mastodon
    5.7 miles west of Pelea

    Santa Theresa Port of Entry Highway crosses grade
    31°49'23.84"N 106°41'03.33"W
    0.5 miles east of Mastodon
    8.2 miles west of Pelea

    Mastodon ,New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 4,112
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Strauss, NM - 7.5 min. series 1955 - T28S-R2E-Section 36
    31°49'20.92"N 106°41'31.05"W
    10.2 miles east of Noria
    8.7 miles west of Pelea
    15.9 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Noria ,New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 4,127
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Noria, NM - 7.5 min. series 1985 - T29S-R1E-Section 8
    31°48'15.94"N 106°51'42.42"W
    Old Borderland Highway is north of tracks. East from this pointit drifts to the north, heading to Strauss, NM on SP Mainline.
    8.4 miles east of Potrillo
    10.2 miles west of Mastodon
    26.1 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Potrillo ,New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 4,247
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Potrillo, NM - 7.5 min. series 1985 - T29S-R2W-Section 12
    31°48'03.44"N 106°59'51.86"W
    Post Office from 1908 to 1914 Old Borderland Highway is north oftracks. Southern tip of the East Potrillo Mountains are approx. 1 mileto the north.
    5.1 miles east of Mount Riley
    8.4 miles west of Noria
    34.7 miles west of El Paso, Texas


    Phoenix/El Paso Airway Emergency Landing Field
    Approximatly 3 miles sotheast of Mount Riley townsite
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)

    Mount Riley ,New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 4,109
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Mount Riley SE, NM - 7.5 min. series 1985 - T29S-R2W-Section 6
    31°48'58.75"N 107°04'53.61"W
    Road to the north goes to the Mt. Riley Ranch & to Mt. Riley, Kilborne Hole. Road to the south goes to Riley Airfield & Mexican border.
    7.3 miles east of Monument
    5.1 miles west of Potrillo
    39.6 mles west of El Paso, Texas

    Dry Lake Beds - Elev. 4,041
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Mount Riley SE, NM - 7.5 min. series 1985 - T29S-R3W-Section12
    31°48'21.30"N 107°06'07.61"W
    Old Borderland Highway is south of tracks.
    5.7 miles east of Monument
    1.6 miles west of Mount Riley

    Monument ,New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 4,111
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: MT. Riley, NM - 15 min. series 1917 - T29S-R3W-Section 18
    31°47'20.65"N 107°11'22.35"W
    Old Borderland Highway is to south of tracks
    3.8 miles east of Malpais
    7.3 miles west of Mount Riley
    46.9 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Malpais ,New Mexico - Dona Ana County - Elev. 4,128
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Camel Mountain, NM - 7.5 min. series 1965 - T29S-R4W-Section98
    31°47'57.95"N 107°15'08.88"W
    Road to the northeast goes to Guzman's Lookout Mountain Road tothe southwest goes to Birchfield Tank, Camel Mountain & Mexican border.Old Borderland Highway crossed the tracks here. To the east it is southof the tracks, to the west, it is north of the tracks.
    11.1 miles east of Arena
    3.8 miles west of Monument
    50.7 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Dona Ana / Luna County Line
    7.9 miles east of Arena
    3.2 miles west of Malpais

    Indian Basin Road
    Goes about 3 miles to the northwest to Indian Basin
    6.7 miles east of Arena
    4.4 miles west of Malpais

    Altair ,New Mexico - Luna County (Exact location unknown)
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    18 (approx.) miles east of Columbus

    Arena Stock Tank & Windmill
    Just south of tracks
    0.7 miles east of Arena
    10.4 miles west of Malpais

    Arena, New Mexico - Luna County - Elev. 3,959
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Coyote Hill, NM - 7.5 min. series 1966 - T29S-R6W-Section12
    31°48'06.05"N 107°24'54.07"W
    Old Border Highway is on the south side of the tracks
    13.5 miles east of Columbus
    11.1 miles west of Malpais
    61.8 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Mirian, New Mexico - Luna County NM (exact location unknown)
    7 (approx.) miles east of Columbus

    Columbus, New Mexico - Luna County - Elev. 4,064
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Columbus, NM - 7.5 min. series 1965 - T28S-R8W-Section 34
    31°49'41.50"N 107°38'23.04"W
    Post Office from 1891 to present Old Border Highway is south oftracks, Primitive dirt to the east, paved NM Highway 9 to the west.
    7.2 miles east of Mimbres
    13.5 miles west of Arena
    75.3 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Mimbres, New Mexico - Luna County - Elev. 4,348
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Malpais Hill, NM - 7.5 min. series 1965 - T28S-R9W-Section10
    31°48'04.30"N 107°45'13.78"W
    12.8 miles east of Hermanas
    7.2 miles west of Columbus
    82.5 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Ford, New Mexico - Luna County (exact location unknown)

    Hermanas, New Mexico - Luna County - Elev. 4,453
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Hermanas, NM - 7.5 min. series 1964 - T28S-R11W-Section 22
    31°51'04.87"N 107°57'10.49"W
    Branch Line to Deming connects here. Old Water tank still standingand used by ranchers Post Office from 1903 to 1925
    5.1 miles east of Savoya
    12.8 miles west of Mimbres
    95.3 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Savoya, New Mexico - Luna County Elev. 4,585
    (SeeTopographic Map)
    USGS: Victorio Ranch SE, NM - 7.5 min. series 1965 - T29S-R12W-Section 1
    31°49'09.16"N 108°00'58.83"W
    7.6 miles east of Victorio
    5.1 miles west of Hermanas
    100.4 miles west of El Paso

    Victorio, New Mexico - Luna County - Elev. 4,576
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Victorio Ranch, NM - 7.5 min. series 1965 - T28S-R13W-Section23
    31°51'03.61"N 108°08'09.26"W
    5.9 miles east of Continental
    7.6 miles west of Savoya
    108.0 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Grant / Luna county line
    0.5 miles east of Continental
    5.4 miles west of Victorio

    Continental, New Mexico - Grant County - Elev. 4,707
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Hat Top Mountain, NM - 7.5 min. series 1982 - T28S-R14W-Section 12
    31°53'11.65"N 108°13'21.73"W
    6.4 miles east of Hachita
    5.9 miles west of Victorio
    113.9 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Hachita ,New Mexico - Grant County - Elev. 4,514
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Hachita, NM - 7.5 min. series 1982 - T27S-R15W-Section 36
    31°55'08.54"N 108°19'19.52"W
    Present town site established in 1902. Post Office from 1882 to 1892, then town moved, Post Office 1902 to present. Junction of Arizona & New Mexico RR to Lordsburg
    3.2 miles east of Minero
    6.4 miles west of Victorio
    120.3 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Minero, New Mexico - Grant County - Elev. 4,519
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Hachita, NM - 15 min. series 1918 - T27S-R15W-Section 28
    31°55'57.38"N 108°22'27.87"W
    4.6 miles east of Vista
    3.2 miles west of Hachita
    123.5 miles west of El Paso, Texas


    (Old)Hachita , New Mexico - Grant County - Elev. 4,850
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)


    Continental Divide - Elev. 4,648
    1.5 miles east of Vista
    3.1 miles west of Minero

    Vista, New Mexico - Grant County - Elev. 4,679
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial photograph)
    USGS: Hachita, NM - 15 min. series 1918 - T27S-R16W-Section 12
    31°57'56.77"N 108°25'55.88"W
    3.7 miles east of Pothook
    4.6 miles west of Minero
    128.1 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Continental Divide - Elev. 4,694
    3.1 miles east of Pothook
    0.6 miles west of Vista

    Pothook, New Mexico - Grant County - Elev. 4,553
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Hachita, NM - 15 min. series 1918 - T27S-R16W-Section 8
    31°58'26.50"N 108°29'32.17"W
    5.8 miles east of Playas
    3.7 miles west of Vista
    131.8 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Hidalgo / Grant County Line
    4.0 miles east of Playas
    1.8 miles west of Pothook

    Playas ,New Mexico - Hidalgo County - Elev. 4,311
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Playas Lake North, NM - 7.5 min. series 1982 - T27S-R17W-Section 7
    31°58'14.75"N 108°36'31.80"W
    Post Office from 1913 to 1918
    12.0 miles east of Animas
    5.8 miles west of Pothook
    137.6 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Continental Divide - Elev. 4,510
    1.0 miles east of Antelope
    5.4 miles west of Playas

    Antelope, New Mexico - Hidalgo County - Elev. 4,496
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Beacon Hill, NM - 7.5 min. series 1982 - T27S-R18W-Section18
    31°57'22.52"N 108°42'52.45"W
    5.6 miles east of Animas
    6.4 miles west of Playas
    144.0 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Animas, New Mexico - Hidalgo County - Elev. 4,404
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Animas, NM - 7.5 min. series 1982 - T27S-R19W-Section 20
    31°56'55.67"N 108°48'20.53"W
    Established in 1843. Post Office from 1909 to Present
    5.4 miles east of Pratt
    5.6 miles west of Antelope
    149.6 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Pratt, New Mexico - Hidalgo County - Elev. 4,425
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Antelope Pass, NM - 7.5 min. series 1982 - T27S-R20W-Section21
    31°56'34.46"N 108°53'40.10"W
    Post Office from 1905 to 1913.
    12.7 miles east of Rodeo
    5.4 miles west of Animas
    155.0 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Antelope Pass - Elev. 4,410
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    Pass through the Peloncillo Mountains
    11.1 miles east of Rodeo
    1.6 miles west of Pratt

    Apan, New Mexico - Hidalgo County (Exact location unknown)
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)


    Rodeo ,New Mexico - Hidalgo County - Elev. 4,128
    (SeeTopographic Map) (See Aerial Photograph)
    USGS: Antelope Pass, NM - 7.5 min. series 1982 - T28S-R21W-Section30
    31°50'08.56"N 109°01'54.21"W
    Post Office from 1903 to Present
    12.7 miles east of Apache
    12.7 miles west of Pratt
    167.7 miles west of El Paso, Texas

    Arizona / New Mexico State Line
    10.7 miles east of Apache
    2.0 miles west of Rodeo
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #12

    Dec 2004
    The Lone Star State
    355
    5 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Jack I hope you never stop posting but you could put together a book called Metaldetectors guide for Dummy's and make a fortune Id buy your book anyday, I personally want to thank you for your help and if I ever find anything using your info I'm sure going to send you a little somethin.
    Dave
    Explorer II
    Minelab Sovereign Elite
    Bounty Hunter 505

  13. #13

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    21 times

    Re: Obscure New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave45
    Jack I hope you never stop posting but you could put together a book called Metaldetectors guide for Dummy's and make a fortune Id buy your book anyday, I personally want to thank you for your help and if I ever find anything using your info I'm sure going to send you a little somethin.
    Dave
    Dave: You're most welcome. When I decided to post a lot of this it was my hope someone would get some use out of it. On the New Mexico Forum, as well as most of the others the threads are predominantly made up of posts by MDers asking for information about places to detect. I thought it something of a shame as well as a mystery. For me finding good places to go looking for evidence of history has never been a problem. Over the years I've filled my head with more of them than I could get to in several lifetimes.

    My intentions in posting a few of them leaned as much to conveying some basic methods for finding places to search as to providing a lot of them I'll probably never return to. I've even teetered on the brink of posting some I hold 'secret and sacred' and have every intention of going back.

    Best of good fortune to you in your searches.
    Jack
    Nichoelle likes this.

  14. #14

    May 2015
    30
    43 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I've always found this resource very informative for looking at New Mexico ghost towns.

    Ghost Towns of New Mexico

    Truly, some are so obscure that you would never know they were there without consulting this website.
    bobw53 likes this.

  15. #15
    us
    Dec 2006
    Central Minnnesota
    White's DFX & VX3
    968
    270 times
    I used 'Ghost towns of New Mexico' many times in the past. My brother & I used to go to N M to detect ghost towns for 6 yrs. We hit Hillsboro and I spent 1-1/2 hrs detecting the old (1892) courthouse, which I had permission at the time from a lady who lived in Texas. I didn't find any coinage, no bottle caps, or pull tabs in the 1-1/2 hrs I detected, but I did find a saloon token from Lake Valley (a ghost town owned by the BLM now). Lake Valley burned in 1893 but continued to exist until a woman finally moved out in the 1950s (?). I put the token up for auction and received a handsome return, being that only 3 others were known to exist. During the 6 yrs (2 weeks every spring) I detected N M, I acquired much printed items (Leaflets, maps, books, etc) concerning gold mining, silver mining, and "lost' ghost towns. I also made many notes on some maps of where I detected.

    On one trip, I followed an arroyo for many miles and found a cluster of 'melted' adobe buildings surrounded by some trees. While detecting, 2 horsemen (tending some cattle) rode up, and they said that although they own the land, they didn't know that that group of adobe buildings existed. They wished us luck and rode off. Then about 2-1/2 miles away, we found an old Catholic church with no roof and with a cemetery next to the church. I think the date on the church was 1909 (forgot at the moment). I haven't been back to N M for 5 yrs now and I don't know if I'll go back in the future....I'm thinking about it.

    Of all the places we visited (only in the lower half of N M), around Silver City looks like one of the best places to hunt due to its history and old buildings.
    bobw53 likes this.

 

 
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