Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Results 1 to 15 of 15
Like Tree8Likes
  • 1 Post By Peyton Manning
  • 1 Post By joshuaream
  • 1 Post By catherine1
  • 1 Post By joshuaream
  • 1 Post By ToddsPoint
  • 1 Post By joshuaream
  • 2 Post By catherine1

Thread: How deep to dig in the low-grounds?

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #1
    us
    Mar 2019
    10
    11 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    How deep to dig in the low-grounds?

    First, new guy here, so please redirect if you know this question has already been discussed. The majority of where I hunt is in low-grounds and it's not uncommon to find a point or tool on the surface after a spring tilling or just walking around. But at this point I'm interested in going deeper, yet am questioning how deep is necessary--especially when digging above the flood-plain I've had to go no more than 10" to find red clay that produces nothing. Being in this flood-plain I've discovered the bottom of the A-Horizon to be anywhere from 3' to 5'+ down. I figure diggin in low-grounds is a game changer in terms of my test hole dimensions, but don't want to waste my time. Questions? Comments? Thoughts? Insults?
    Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees.

  2. #2
    us
    Feb 2010
    Missouri
    2,547
    1532 times
    If you're finding them on the surface you shouldn't have to dig very deep (obviously). I'm not a digger so I really don't know.

  3. #3
    us
    the boss

    Mar 2008
    south dakota
    good eyes
    3,989
    3292 times
    Where I hunt and find things on the surface there were archeological digs done back in the 70’s. A friend who was in high school at the time had volunteered to help. He said that 4 foot down they had revealed fire rings.
    But I have a feeling it’s different everywhere.

  4. #4
    us
    Sep 2012
    maine
    923
    1292 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    In Maine the deepest I go is about 2'.. This is at a site that I have found surface finds...It's near a stream and lake and on a hill...But it would have to be different everywhere...My site is mostly late to middle Archaic..mjm

  5. #5
    us
    May 2014
    Eastern Shore Maryland
    2,181
    2355 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Itís probably gonna be different pretty much site to site not sure thereís a good way to figure it out besides probing and digging test pits , maybe look for any archeological digs done nearby see what depths they found artifacts.
    I would rather see an authentic broken scraper posted than a G-10 Artifake!

  6. #6
    us
    Mar 2019
    10
    11 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Thanks for the insight and the direction yall. I figure there is no rule of thumb--esp. when it comes to flood plain. Place is right next to a river that will flood 9 times some years and other years it won't flood at all. People tell me all kinds of depths, so I'm often left thinking that there is nothing wrong with going further. One thing I have noticed is that the points found on the surface are never archaic from what I can tell, but I and another digger have found archaic pieces above the flood plain in that area; makes me think digging further is the way to go, just how deep. Also, right next to a granite quarry with veins of quartzite among others. Again, thanks.
    Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees.

  7. #7

    Dec 2012
    MXT-PRO Sandshark
    12,492
    12361 times
    Metal Detecting
    You sound like you went to college, I can’t help you
    arrow86 likes this.
    DONíT TRUST WHITEY / Navin Johnson


    EVERYTHINGS GONNA BE ALRIGHT, EVERYTHINGS GONNA BE OK.
    ITS GONNA BE A GOOD GOOD LIFE, THATíS WHAT MY THERAPISTS SAY. / Bebe rexha


    IF YOUíRE LOST AND ALONE, OR YOUíRE SINKING LIKE A STONE, CARRY ON / Fun

  8. #8
    us
    Jun 2009
    Florida & Hong Kong
    2,012
    1572 times
    The Gault Site in Texas was a pay dig for the better part of 50 years, and the paleo layers were essentially untouched in many areas because collectors and early archaeologists simply did not dig deeper than the Archaic midden. (A few did, but it was hit or miss.)

    I know several collectors in Kentucky who have great collections redigging cave sites that have been dug for years, they just have to use jacks & winches to move rocks that have fallen or simply have to dig through a sterile layer that people never bothered to punch through.

    All of that said, you are likely going to find the highest concentration of artifacts in more recent/shallower deposits. Digging 1x1 hole 5 feet deep is a lot harder to do than a 5x1 hole one foot down. If the soil is right many of us just dig a wall and then collapse that wall backfilling as we go. (You use a pick more than the shovel, the shovel is just for cleaning up the loose dirt.)
    catherine1 likes this.

  9. #9
    us
    Mar 2019
    10
    11 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    thanks joshuaream--good point. I guess if I get into some thick traffic I can always go deeper.
    Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees.

  10. #10
    us
    mudman

    Feb 2017
    middle tennessee
    469
    938 times
    Relic Hunting
    When I stop seeing any signs of occupation or debitage, that is as deep as im going. I will do a test every so often and dig deeper to make sure. You can never know with certainty there is nothing deeper but its hard to keep going when you arent seeing anything in it.

  11. #11
    um
    Jun 2010
    1,669
    895 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Your not going to find very many artifacts digging on a flood plain because they never lived there. Mostly artifacts from hunting or fishing next to the river. I plowed a test spot on the flood plain below my campsite, and found one artifact. I plowed test spots above the flood plain and found abundant evidence of habitation in every test plow. Yes there are artifacts in the flood plain. But not enough concentrated in one spot worth digging. If you want to dig a flood plain, start at the flooded waterline, and dig above it. I have found many artifacts on the bank heading down to the flood plain from my campsite. Good luck digging near a flood plain.
    Last edited by catherine1; Mar 17, 2019 at 10:48 PM.
    arrow86 likes this.

  12. #12
    us
    Jun 2009
    Florida & Hong Kong
    2,012
    1572 times
    Quote Originally Posted by catherine1 View Post
    Your not going to find very many artifacts digging on a flood plain because they never lived there.
    It sounds like you are testing, which is important.

    In my experience, it's worth remembering that ancient flood plains could be very different beasts than modern ones. Some of it was cyclical climate related, Cahokia and some other big mound cities didn't see much flooding for a couple hundred years during their big growth phases, but probably saw regular flooding afterwards. In many other areas modern leeves, cities, farm fields with drainage tiles, modern straightened rivers, and fewer wetlands, etc. all push water down river quicker than before. Natural forests and wetlands can absorb a 20" rain with moderate local flooding. Drop 20" of water along the Mississippi river today, and that water will push down stream and literally pile up like it did back in 1993 with a historic flood.
    catherine1 likes this.

  13. #13
    us
    Mar 2018
    Todds Point, IL
    1,225
    1825 times
    Metal Detecting
    The soil in the floodplain of the IL River is deep. Each time the river floods, soil is added to the floodplain. When they put in the new Eagle Bridge over the IL River on I-72 they dug a borrow pit over 100' deep in the flood plain on the east end of the bridge. As the pit slowly filled, a friend of mine used a small boat and hunted artifacts along the walls of the pit. He found lenses of charcoal (campfire remains viewed from the side) over 50' down. The newest charcoal lens, which contained Mississippian triangle arrow points was 17' below the current surface. So at that particular location you'd have to dig 17' to find anything at all. Gary
    arrow86 likes this.

  14. #14
    us
    Jun 2009
    Florida & Hong Kong
    2,012
    1572 times
    Gary,

    Jeez, I thought Archaic material at 8’ down along the Wabash River was deep. Can you imagine how deep paleo would be at that site?

    Joshua
    ToddsPoint likes this.

  15. #15
    um
    Jun 2010
    1,669
    895 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Right Josh. I'm sure the river flooding was different thousands of years ago. But I have noticed that all of my local archaic sites that I find artifacts are miles away from the large rivers. And most of the places people find older artifacts digging are in rock shelters also. I don't know where you could find the actual flood plain levels from back in the day, but it would be some valuable information. The flooding here along the Ohio seems to be the same as two thousand years ago. The woodland sites that I know of are all above the flood plain today, even with the dams controlling the water.
    arrow86 and ToddsPoint like this.

 

 

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: Nov 29, 2017, 12:19 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: May 18, 2017, 08:47 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Dec 22, 2015, 05:58 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Dec 21, 2015, 06:20 PM

Tags for this Thread

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0