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  1. #1
    us
    Oct 2006
    Whites XLT
    559

    Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!


    Note: Permission to reprint, repost or forward the following article in full is granted, but only if it is not edited or excerpted.



    Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    By James Wesley, Rawles -- Editor of www.SurvivalBlog.com

    Updated, January, 2010

    I've often mused about how fun it would be to have a time machine and travel back to the early 1960s, and go on a pre-inflation shopping spree. In that era, most used cars were less than $800, and a new-in-the box Colt .45 Automatic sold for $60. In particular, it would be great to go back and get a huge pile of rolls of then-circulating US silver dimes, quarters, and half dollars at face value. (With silver presently around $15.50 per ounce, the US 90% silver (1964 and earlier) coinage is selling wholesale at 11 times face value--that is $11,000 for a $1,000 face value bag.)

    The disappearance of 90% silver coins from circulation in the US in the mid-1960s beautifully illustrated Gresham's Law: "Bad Money Drives Out Good." People quickly realized that the debased copper sandwich coins were bogus, so anyone with half a brain saved every pre-'65 (90% silver) coin that they could find. (This resulted in a coin shortage from 1965 to 1967, while the mint frantically played catch up, producing millions of cupronickel "clad" coins. This production was so hurried that they even skipped putting mint marks on coins from 1965 to 1967.)

    Alas, there are no time machines. But what if I were to tell you that there is a similar,albeit smaller-scale opportunity? Consider the lowly US five cent piece--the "nickel."

    Unlike US dimes and quarters, which stopped being made of 90% silver after 1964, the composition of a nickel has essentially been unchanged since the end of World War II. It is still a 5 gram coin that is an alloy of 75% copper and 25% nickel. (An aside: Some 1942 to 1945 five cent coins were made with 35% silver, because nickel was badly-needed for wartime industrial use. Those "War Nickels" have long since been culled from circulation, by collectors.)

    According to www.Coinflation.com, the 1946-2008 Nickel (with a 5 cent face value) had a base metal value of $0.0677413 in 2008. That was 135.48% of its face value. (In recent months, with the recession, and a decline in industrial demand for copper, the base metal value of a nickel dropped below face value. But even at today's commodities prices, you will start outat "break even" by amassing a stockpile of nickels.) I predict that as inflation resumes--most likely beginning in 2011--the base metal value of nickels will rise substantially.

    The Root of the Problem

    It is inevitable that any country that issues a continually-inflated fiat paper currency will run into the problem of their coinage eventually having its base metal value exceed its face value. When this happens, it is one of those embarrassing "emperor's new clothes" moments. Unless a government takes the drastic step of lopping off a zero or two from their currency, this coinage problem is inevitable. In essence, we were robbed by our own government when silver coins were replaced with copper sandwich coins in the 1960s. I predict that essentially the same thing will soon to happen with nickels.

    Helicopter Ben Bernanke will inflate his way out of the current liquidity crisis. through artificial lowering of interest rates, massive injections of liquidity, and monetization of the Federal debt. That can only spell one thing: inflation, and plenty of it. Mass inflation will mean much higher commodities prices (at least from the perspective of the US currency.)

    I predict that until perhaps 2012, the US Mint will continue to produce nickels with the current metals composition. This is an open window of opportunity, during which time SurvivalBlog readers can salt away countless bags of nickels.

    Within just a few years, the base metal value of a nickel is likely to exceed two times ("2X") its face value. (10 cents each.) The nickel will then begin to disappear from circulation. (Gresham's law is unavoidable.) Unlike the mid-1960s experience, the missing nickels will not cause a crisis, since pennies will suffice for making small change, and most vending machines now use dimes as their smallest purchase increment. Meanwhile, most bridge tolls and toll roads have inflated so that tolls are in 25 cent increments. The demise of the nickel will hardly cause a ripple in the news.

    Unless the Treasury decides to drop the issuance of nickels entirely, the US Mint will within the next three years be forced to introduce a "new" nickel with a debased composition. It will possibly be zinc (flashed with silver) or possibly even aluminum.

    Why Not Pennies?

    You may ask, why not accumulate 95% copper (pre-1983 mint date) pennies? They already seen a spike in their base metal value to 2.2 cents each. But unfortunately, pennies have two problems: confusion and bulk. They are confusing, because 95% copper pennies are now circulating side-by-side with 97.5% zinc pennies. They are also about four times as bulky (per dollar of face value) as nickels.

    With nickels you won't have to spend time sorting out pre-1983 varieties. At present, visually date sorting pennies simply isn't worth your time. Although I suppose that if someone were to invent an automated density-measuring penny sorting machine, he could make a fortune. As background: The pre-1983 pennies recently had a base metal value of about $0.0226 each.) Starting in 1983, the mint switched to 97.5% zinc pennies that are just flashed with copper. Those presently have a base metal value of only about $0.0071 each.

    Pennies are absurdly bulky and heavy to store. Nickels are also quite bulky, but are at least more manageable than pennies for a small investor's storage. (Storing pennies would take a tremendous amount of space and constitute a huge weight per dollar invested.)

    The biggest advantage of nickels over pennies is that there is no date/composition confusion. At least for now, a nickel is a nickel. Even the newly-minted "large portrait" nickels have the same 75/25 cupronickel composition. But that is likely to change within just a couple of years. The US Mint cannot go on minting nickels at a loss much longer. My advice: start filling military surplus ammo cans with $2 (40 coin) rolls of nickels.

    The .30 caliber size can is the perfect width for rolls of nickels. Each can will hold 11 bank rolls of nickels per layer, and the can will hold eight layers. On the top layer there is room for one more roll. Thus, they'll hold a total of 89 rolls per ammo can, or $178. Any larger containers would be difficult to move easily. (Avoid back strain!) Cardboard boxes are fragile, and lack a carry handle. But ammo cans are very sturdy, have an integral handle, and they are relatively cheap and plentiful. They are available at military surplus stores and gun shows. The current difference between a nickel's base metal value and its face value is fairly smal, but trust me, it will grow! Someday, when nickels are worth 4X to 8X their face value, your children will thank you for it. Consider it an investment in your children's future.

    In December of 2006, the US congress passed a law making it illegal to bulk export or melt down pennies and nickels. But once the old composition pennies and nickels have been driven out of circulation, that is likely to change. In fact, a bill now before congress would remove pre-1983 pennies from the melting ban. In any case, once the base metal value exceeds face value by about 3X, an investor's market will develop, regardless of whether or not melting is re-legalized. Count on it.

    What if Uncle Sam Decides to Drop a Zero?

    As previously noted in SurvivalBlog, inflation of the US dollar has been chronic, cumulative, and insidious. So much so that turns of phrase from old movies like "penny candy" and "its your nickel" (to describe the cost of a call on a pay phone) now seem quaint and outdated. When inflation goes on long enough, the number of digits required to express a price grows too large. (As has been seen with the Italian lira, the Zimbabwean dollar, and countless other currencies. One whitewash solution to chronic inflation that several other nations have chosen is dropping one, two, or even three zeros from their currency, in an overnight revaluation, with a mandatory paper currency exchange. The history of the past century has shown that when doing so, most governments re-issue only new paper currency, but leave the old coinage in circulation, at the same face value. This is because the sheer logistics of a coinage swap would be daunting. Typically, this leaves the holders of coinage as the unexpected beneficiaries of a 10X, 100X.or even 1,000X gain of the value of their coins. Governments just assume that most citizens just have a couple of pocketfuls of coins at any given time. So if a currency swap were to happen while you are sitting on a big pile of nickels, you would make a handsome profit. To "cash in", you could merely spend your saved nickels in the new currency regime.

    How To Build Your Pile of Nickels

    How can you amass a big pile-o-nickels? Obviously just saving the few that you normally receive as pocket change is insufficient. Here are some possibilities:

    1.) If you live in a state with nickel slot machine gambling (such as Nevada or New Jersey), or near an Indian tribal casino with nickel slots, go to a casino frequently and buy $50 in nickels at a time. Do your best to look like a gambler when doing so, by carrying a plastic change bucket with a few nickels in the bottom.

    2.) Obtain nickels in rolls from your friendly local bank teller. Most "retail" banks are already accustomed to handing over rolls of coins to private depositors because of collector demand for statehood commemorative quarters and the new presidential dollar coins. Ask for $20 or $30 of nickels in rolls each time that you visit to do your normal banking deposits or withdrawals. It is best to ask for new "wrapped" (fresh Federal Reserve Bank issue) rolls. This way, you might have the chance of getting rolls with valuable minting errors--such as "double die" strikes. These are usually noticed and publicized a few months after the fact, and can be quite valuable. You will also be assured that you are getting full 40 coin rolls. (Getting shorted with 38 or 39 coin rolls is possible with hand-rolled coins.) If the tellers ask why you want so many, you can honestly tell them: "I'm working on a collection for my children." (You need not tell them how large a collection it is!)

    3.) If you live in or near an urban area and you operate a business, you can effectively "buy" rolled coinage from your commercial bank. (They generally will not do any business with anyone unless they have an account.) It might be worth your while to on paper start a side business with "Vending Service" in its name, and have business cards and stationary printed up in that name. Have that "DBA" business entity name added to your commercial bank account. At a high-volume commercial bank you could conceivably buy hundreds or even thousands of dollars worth of nickels on the pretense of stocking change for a vending business. Depending on your relationship with the bank, they may waive any fees if you ask for a few rolls of coins. Be advised, however, that if you ask for any significant quantity at one time, they will probably charge you a premium. (Down in the small print of your account contract, there is probably wording something like this: "Coin Issued - Per Roll: .03 Currency Issued - Per $ 100: .08" Before you cry "foul", be aware that the Federal Reserve actually charges your bank a small premium when they obtain wrapped rolls of coins. (Most folks have held to the convenient fiction that a paper dollar was the same as a dollar in change. Obviously, it isn't.) In effect, your commercial banker will just be passing along this cost to you. Unless they charge you a heavy fee, don't worry about it. Ten years from now, when a $2 roll of nickel is worth $16, you'll be laughing about how you obtained $4,000 face value in nickels at just a small fraction over their face value.

    4.) If you know someone that has a machine vending business, offer to buy all of their excess nickels once every month or two, by offering a small premium.

    5.) If you operate a "mom and pop" retail business with a walk-in clientele, put up a small sign next to your cash register that reads: "WANTED: Rolls of nickels for my collection. I pay $2.25 per 40 coin ($2) roll, regardless of year!" Once the nickel shortage develops (as it inevitably will), you should raise you premium gradually, to keep a steady stream of coin rolls coming in.

    After this is posted, I'm sure that I'm going to get plenty of ridicule, accusing me of "hoarding." So be it. Let me preemptively state that I realize that money tied up in coins will not benefit from the interest that a bank deposit would earn. But foregoing interest is not a major concern. Why? Because I think that it is a fairly safe bet that commodity price inflation will outstrip the prevailing interest rates for at least the next five years. In five years, the circulating nickel as we now know it, will be history, and it will be treated with nearly the same reverence that we now give to pre-'65 silver coinage.

    We saw what happened when clad copper dimes, quarters and half dollars were introduced in 1965. We should learn from history. Something comparable will very likely soon to happen with nickels. You, as a SurvivalBlog.com reader, are now armed with that knowledge. You can and should benefit from it, before Uncle Sugar performs his next sleight of hand trick and starts passing off silver-plated zinc tokens as "nickels". - James Wesley, Rawles -- Editor of www.SurvivalBlog.com

    Permission to forward, repost, or reprint this article is granted, but only in its entirely with attribution and links intact.



    Copyright 2010. All Rights Reserved by James Wesley, Rawles - www.SurvivalBlog.com™ Permission to reprint, repost or forward this article in full is granted, but only if it is not edited or excerpted.

    About the Author:
    James Wesley, Rawles is a former U.S. Army Intelligence officer and a noted author and lecturer on survival and preparedness topics. He is the author of "Patriots: A Novel of Survival in the Coming Collapse" and is the editor of SurvivalBlog.com--the popular daily web journal for prepared individuals living in uncertain times.



    Tuolumne County Incident Feed
    http://incidentfeed.com

  2. #2
    us
    Oct 2006
    Whites XLT
    559

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rando
    I have been an avid reader of J Wesley, Rawles for a LONG time.


    He is a truly amazing man who just lost his wonderful wife, Linda. (The memsahib)
    I just finished "Patriots". All I can say is wow.
    Tuolumne County Incident Feed
    http://incidentfeed.com

  3. #3

    Oct 2007
    535
    18 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    the sky is falling.......

    db

  4. #4

    Oct 2007
    535
    18 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    what.... your going to sit and hoard a bunch of nickles on a speculative hunch?....

    why not hoard gold? it all ways has and will have a better cash return in value.....ie volume , weight and size...

    Or is it because the nickle has easier accessibility?

    OH....and then wait for your kids to Possibly make a small profit from melting down a pile of coin nickles or selling for scrap values

    the nickle is going no where......back in the early 80's.....the same speculative thing was said about pennies....and look they are still here....they just lost a little copper content....


    db

  5. #5
    us
    Kerry

    Jan 2009
    Michigan
    Garrett AT Pro, Garrett Pro-Pointer
    178
    30 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    I don't see why he would exclude pre 82 pennies. They are already worth over 100% their value in melt value. If what he says is right these should continue to increase quicker than the nickels. Also they are pretty easy to sort just by sight. I know it would be harder to just buy large amounts and forget it but it probably would be worthwhile to sort, just slit the rolls and pull out all the zincs. Of course I would think it would be better just to buy all the silver coins and bars you can instead of nickels.

  6. #6
    mts
    mts is offline
    us
    May 2009
    Tesoro Vaquero, Tesoro Silver µMax, BH Tracker IV, Garrett ProPointer
    1,179
    5 times

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    Quote Originally Posted by krazyace
    I don't see why he would exclude pre 82 pennies. They are already worth over 100% their value in melt value. If what he says is right these should continue to increase quicker than the nickels. Also they are pretty easy to sort just by sight. I know it would be harder to just buy large amounts and forget it but it probably would be worthwhile to sort, just slit the rolls and pull out all the zincs. Of course I would think it would be better just to buy all the silver coins and bars you can instead of nickels.
    I agree. Pennies are already at 2.3 times face so you get an immediate profit. If the nickel does go up then the penny will likely go up too (due to common copper composition). So the penny will easily be worth 5X face when the nickel finally reaches 2X face. I can buy $1000 face value of pennies for the same amount that I can buy $1000 face value worth of nickels. But that $1000 worth of pennies will be worth $5000 down the road whereas the nickels will only be worth $2000. Of course, if nickel goes up but copper stays flat then it will be a completely different result.

    It is true that the nickels are easier to accumulate so you have to take that into account. There is no dumping with nickels which is obviously a major benefit. But I currently use my metal detector to sort pennies into copper vs. zinc and I can do it very quickly with 100% accuracy. No date checking required. People who use Ryedale sorters can do it even quicker. I can get about 90% accuracy doing them by sight but I'm always amazed at some of the ones I miss. Unfortunately, the biggest issue with pennies is that you have to dump your zincs which increases costs. I use the local coinstar machine's "free counting" option to get eCertificates to stores that I want to shop at. So I save up my zincs until I need something from Amazon and then take in $100 worth for an eCertificate. It's a good deal and very easy. There aren't any other free coin counting options in my area as all of the banks have gotten rid of their machines.

    Both denominations have the potential to provide you with premium coins as well. You could find war nickels in some rolls of nickels but that would mean that you are actually going to open them and date search them. You can find IH and wheat pennies and since these are copper they are easier to locate. You first sort out all of the zincs and then you can sort out wheats and IH's from the smaller, remaining amount. I average around 10 wheat pennies per box of pennies but I hear that is actually higher than a lot of people tend to experience. War nickels are worth around $1 and so are most common IH's. Wheat pennies are currently worth around 4 cents but some can be quite expensive. In general I think you are more likely to find wheat pennies and IH's than you are to find war nickels. But you just never know.

    I've also heard that the pennies are actually more desirable because if the melt ban is lifted it is easier to melt them down and reuse the resulting metal. Being 95% copper you can just melt them and use them as-is for a lot of purposes. Nickels however, require significant work to separate the copper from the nickel which decreases their worth. If a nickel was pure nickel it would be a completely different story. But it really depends on which of the two metals becomes more desirable. If nickel shoots way up and copper stays flat, then nickels will obviously be more desirable and worth the effort to separate the metals.

    The idea of the US "dropping a zero" is interesting and I haven't thought of that before. But I'm not sure that I would bank on it. I would think that the government would go ahead and mint new coins. That's what Great Britain did. We have too many companies that have massive amounts of change on hand that would benefit from not doing so. The government would never allow that to happen as it simply wouldn't be fair. Imagine a company like Brinks that deals in millions of dollars in rolled change every day. They would be the instant beneficiaries of a 10X increase in value of their inventory! It's not enough to only consider personal stashes when devaluing currency. The government can't just "ignore" change with the assumption that "people don't keep much of it on hand". The general population is not the one you need to worry about when it comes to change.

    It's an interesting topic. But I'm not going to run out and start hoarding nickels just yet. Even with pennies I'm looking at the long haul. I'm going to do about one box a week for the next 10 years so that I eventually have a pretty massive hoard of them. And when they go to 5X or 10X I'm going to sell them off and take my small profit. Which of course, still will not be enough to even cover the cost of a nice vacation! If you are looking to get rich then don't waste your time hoarding coins. Even the people who hoarded silver didn't do any better than they could have done by investing that money in the stock market or any of the other multitudes of investment opportunities that also benefitted greatly from high inflation and high interest rates. I don't expect to get rich. I just enjoy doing it and enjoy the possibility of finding that rare wheat or IH penny. It's all part of a balanced investment plan in which bullion is only one small part.

    One more thing... many older Canadian nickels are 99.9% pure nickel. I wonder if any of our friendly neighbors up north care to comment on this? I've heard that the pure nickel ones are now hard to find. But I'd love to hear the real scoop.

  7. #7
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,341
    2771 times

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    HI: sheesh, why not just invest in a new mining company that has enough nickle / chrome / Pt etc for this century? And it is located in Canada. Shares going for $1:50 Canadian. Always a chance that it could hit $ 7:00+.

    NI 43-101 Update: OVER 11M tonnes of Nickel ! 6.9M tonnes @ 2.04% Ni (ind.) + 4.3M tonnes @ 1.42% Ni (inf.)

    Remember it is illegal to melt any US coinage.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  8. #8
    mts
    mts is offline
    us
    May 2009
    Tesoro Vaquero, Tesoro Silver µMax, BH Tracker IV, Garrett ProPointer
    1,179
    5 times

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    Quote Originally Posted by Real de Tayopa
    HI: sheesh, why not just invest in a new mining company that has enough nickle / chrome / Pt etc for this century? And it is located in Canada. Shares going for $1:50 Canadian. Always a chance that it could hit $ 7:00+.

    NI 43-101 Update: OVER 11M tonnes of Nickel ! 6.9M tonnes @ 2.04% Ni (ind.) + 4.3M tonnes @ 1.42% Ni (inf.)

    Remember it is illegal to melt any US coinage.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    Why not just invest in Microsoft or Apple instead? Why? Because there is risk involved. When I buy pennies or nickels I know that they will be worth no less than I paid for them. And they could end up being worth 10X more. Plus, it isn't an even-or situation. You can save pennies/nickels AND invest in Microsoft, Apple, or a mining company. Saving pennies and silver coins isn't my only investment. Far from it. But it is definitely the one that I derive the most enjoyment from...

  9. #9
    us
    Feb 2008
    southern NJ
    848
    7 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    Quote Originally Posted by Real de Tayopa

    Remember it is illegal to melt any US coinage.
    No, it isn't. You can't melt cents and nickels. All the rest are fair game.

  10. #10
    us
    Aug 2010
    Key West
    Fisher, Whites, Tesoro
    517

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    I'm not into doomsday survival and all that, but found this article very interesting. I often wondered what people did when the silver coins stopped in 1965. I was 8 years old then and have no memory of people saving all silver coins.

    I liked this post.

    Old Town

  11. #11
    us
    what hath god wrought

    Feb 2009
    Gateway to the 1000 Islands
    Sometime(s)
    4,145
    718 times
    tectin crap

    Re: Mass Inflation Ahead -- Save Your Nickels!

    Nickel and penny soup....MmmmmMmmmm Gooood.
    Federal Bureau of Governmental Redundancy Reduction Agency

 

 

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