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  1. #16

    Oct 2016
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    This portion pinned down the location of two caches (Holdup Cut).
    HOLDUP CUT
    On the old Lavina trail, not far from Billings and near the head of Five Mile Creek, after the road had swung away from Alkali Creek, was a notch in the hills known as Holdup Cut, so named, it is said, because it was a particularly favorable spot for holdups. And a number of them took place there. The road skirted along a point of rock with a cliff on one side and the creek on the other; so removing all chance for the stage to turn around if once cornered. The trail then crossed the stream and turned north.
    The Billings and Benton line’s first superintendent was Walter Burke. He was later replaced by John J. Davis. One of the promoters of the line was T.C. Power, later United States Senator from Montana and long one of its leading stockmen, merchants and capitalists. The first driver employed on, the line was a man named Hayes, but he was followed by many others. In 1885, Wells Fargo & Co. let an express contract to the Billings-Benton line and express stations were established at Lavina, Halbert, Ubet, Cottonwood, Lewistown, Maiden, and Fort Maginnis.
    Tradition has it that the town of Ubet owes its name Col. Wilbur F. Sanders, Montana lawyer pioneer who prosecuted the bandits rounded up in Alder Gulch by the Vigilantes. He and several others were riding on the stage line in that region with a morose and curt driver whose response to all remarks was a short yes or no. Finally, one of the party produced a bottle of liquor and proffered it to the reinsman with the query, “Have one?”
    “You bet,” he responded heartily, and the members of the party dubbed the next stopping place Ubet in memory of the driver’s display of garrulity.
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  2. #17
    us
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiredman View Post
    Correct my getting into doing this was due to Thomas P. Terry and his books. There is a lot to researching these stories and clearing up confusion with some of the old stories or legends as some call them. At first I set out to find the whole story behind the short briefs. The plan was folks that metal detecting or like lost treasure stories would like them. We ended up doing better than planned and hit the tourist market. Who would have thought there was a tourist market for lost treasure, then came the Travel Channel which was another unexpected result.
    Writing that facts are often kind of dull compared to legends was not aimed at you- think you understand it was a very general observation.
    I don't think using the term "legend" has to mean a tale is necessarily untrue.
    Your work in sorting through the times, the people, places, and events might keep folks from going on wrong trails, or give them an insight which might lead to lost treasure.
    I was just thinking if a outlaw gang had a few successes, it stands to reason they had to hide some of the goods somewhere. Where would they spend it all under their circumstances. And they could hardly carry it with them at all times.
    You may forget but let me tell you this: someone in some future time will think of us-Sappho

  3. #18

    Mar 2007
    Salinas, CA
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    wow
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  4. #19
    Charter Member
    us
    Jul 2006
    Florida
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    Tom, this is the legend forum, IT IS ABOUT TREASURE LEGENDS, if your getting "miffed" or have trouble with legends then don't enter the forum, stop harassing members who believe and or are researching legends.
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  5. #20

    Oct 2016
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    Thank you!
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  6. #21

    Mar 2007
    Salinas, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treasure_Hunter View Post
    ... IT IS ABOUT TREASURE LEGENDS, ...
    Yes. You are right. And ... oddly and ironically ... this post just defines what "legend" is. Thus, with that definition, you are right : No need to cast doubt on it. Since, by definition, it's only a legend after all.

  7. #22
    Charter Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom_in_CA View Post
    Yes. You are right. And ... oddly and ironically ... this post just defines what "legend" is. Thus, with that definition, you are right : No need to cast doubt on it. Since, by definition, it's only a legend after all.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    PLEASE READ OUR RULES. CLICK HERE TO READ ------> TreasureNet.com Rules

    2nd Amendment
    "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed"

    Si vis pacem, para bellum "If you want peace, prepare for war!

    USAF 1967-1971

    I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic..."

    No Expiration Date!

  8. #23

    Oct 2016
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    Researching Treasure Stories Author
    NEIGHBOR SUSPECTED
    One of the first holdups on the Billings-Benton line was at Holdup Cut, also known as Fifteen Mile Point. After it was perpetrated, suspicion pointed towards William Bussey, who lived in the neighborhood. His actions afterwards led to his tragic death at the hands of one of his neighbors. The stage was held up at the point just as it came around the bend, by a man wearing a slicker and having a handkerchief tied about his face. He stepped from behind a rock and threw his gun down on the driver just of the stage was coming up on a landing after having crossed Five Mile Creek “Give me a match,” he demanded of the driver.
    When the driver started to comply, the man added, “Well, you might as well throw off the mail bags. I want them, too.”
    The mail was thrown off. The passengers were not molested and the man rode away with his booty.
    The stage continued on to Twenty Mile Station where the horses were changed. Bussey was there when the stage drove in, and it was later ascertained that he had arrived only a short time before it.

  9. #24

    Oct 2016
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    Researching Treasure Stories Author
    LAUGHED HIMSELF INTO SUSPICION
    When the robbery was reported, Bussey manifested great interest and made the driver repeat every detail of the Incident. “Asked you for a match?” he said, and then laughed uproariously. As the story was continued, Bussey met each succeeding detail with chuckles and laughter. His manner aroused the suspicions of those at the station, but there was no proof that he had committed the holdup, so no action was taken. Reports of his conduct spread in the neighborhood, however, and when, a short time later, several ranchmen found that their cattle were disappearing from the range, suspicion again turned toward Bussey. Bussey, sensing the feeling against him, started hiding out in the hills.
    A farmer named Raymond had lost some cattle, and he not only suspected that Bussey had stolen them, but he also suspected that Mrs. Raymond, his wife, had been aiding Bussey by carrying food to him.
    One morning, Raymond’s son reported to his father that he had seen Bussey crawling out of a haystack near the barns where it was evident he had spent the night. Raymond got his rifle and began a watch for Bussey. He presently saw him slipping furtively toward one of the outbuildings. He followed him. Bussey saw Raymond coming and crawled into a piano box that had been stored in the barn. Raymond discovered him there, stepped back and began firing into the box.
    When Bussey’s body was examined, there were seventeen bullet holes found in it. Raymond was convicted of murder and sentenced to six years imprisonment. In sentencing him, the judge said he thought Raymond was justified in killing Bussey, but that he disapproved of the method and that riddling the body with bullets showed an animosity and lack of propriety which should be punished.
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  10. #25

    Oct 2016
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    Researching Treasure Stories Author
    A DARK-EYED BANDIT
    A robbery on the Billings-Benton line which caused much excitement was staged at Painted Robe near Lavina. At the top of Painted Robe Hill in a clump of trees, a short, dark man with a brown mustache waited for the stage which had been reported as carrying a heavy consignment of gold from the Spotted Horse Mine at Maiden.
    As the horses labored to the top of the hill with the stage, the man rode from the trees and shot down one of the lead animals. The stage driver was Jeff Kimball.
    The holdup wore a wide brimmed white hat, and the lower half of his face was covered with a handkerchief. The robber took the passengers’ valuables, but there was no consignment of bullion or money aboard.
    Among the passengers was a woman who lived at Lewistown. She watched the bandit as he worked. Several weeks later she went to the sheriff’s office at Lewistown and told that officer that the man who had robbed the stage at Lavina was in town, that she had seen him. The sheriff accompanied her down the street and she pointed out a well-dressed man with dark eyes.
    “That’s him,” she declared. “I know him by his eyes.” A postal inspector took up the case, obtained some other evidence, and finally the man was arrested. He was given a hearing before a United States Commissioner in Billings, but was dismissed for lack of evidence.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  11. #26

    Oct 2016
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    Researching Treasure Stories Author
    CAPTURE OF BANK ROBBERS
    Another happening near Lavina which aroused much interest at the time was the capture of three men wanted for the daylight robbery of a bank at Belle Fourche, S.D., in which a man had been killed.
    The bandits escaped through Wyoming and went into hiding near Red Lodge. Someone recognized them and a posse was formed to smoke them out. They got wind of the search, however, and started to leave the country, heading north over the Lavina trail. They met numerous persons on the road, but they were dressed as cowboys, rode quietly along driving some pack horses ahead of them, and attracted little attention.
    Stopping at Lavina, they went into a saloon kept by Clay Jolley and asked him to cash a check on the Belle Fourche Bank. Jolley knew of the robbery, and when he saw the check, he suspectted that these were the men who had committed it. So, he made a pretense of going after change. Instead, he went into his beer cellar and locked the door behind him.
    The men waited for a time and, when he failed to return, left the saloon, mounted, and rode north of Lavina to make camp. There, the posse which had trailed them from Billings, overtook them. One of the outlaw’s horses was killed, and the three men were arrested before they had an opportunity to shoot. They were taken back to Billings and placed in jail. The three men who formed the posse which captured them, received $1,800. The three bank robbers, however, escaped later.
    *NOTE: These bank robbers were Kid Curry and some of his gang members.

 

 
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