how do you get those copper-silver medieval coins to look good?
Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By Iron Patch
  • 2 Post By Silver Searcher

Thread: how do you get those copper-silver medieval coins to look good?

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #1
    au
    Oct 2012
    Australia
    Garrett Ace 250, Garrett AT Pro, Vulcan 360 Pinpointer, Geotech Barracuda Pi, Minelab Sovereign GT, Minelab Explorer 2, bounty hunter pinpointer,
    77
    95 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    how do you get those copper-silver medieval coins to look good?

    Hi,
    I have purchased these Hungarian coins of ebay. Some of them are silver but when i was cleaning them i realised that they have changed more of a orange copper color.
    I have like 5 of the same coins that are silver-copper alloy and they're not all silver colored apart from 1. I have had some outstanding results with vinegar with a coin that looked like
    nothing turned to a coin with lots of details.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_14761.png 
Views:	2122 
Size:	4.01 MB 
ID:	806501

  2. #2
    You will not get that result unless the coin still retains a lot of the surface silver pre cleaning.
    Generic_Lad likes this.

  3. #3

    May 2013
    4
    Best way to clean real silver in the uk is to use some tin foil put the coin inside the foil spit on it and press the coin between the foil and it should start to gey warm then rub it gently between the foil I know the method aound unorthadox but it works a treat and tell you if it silver or not because if its not silver it wont warm up in the foil and spit

  4. #4
    us
    Apr 2011
    Wyoming
    Garrett AT Pro, XP Deus, DetectorPro Headhunter & BlissTool
    1,098
    1394 times
    Metal Detecting
    I'm sure a lot of folks would agree with me when I say use nothing more than soapy water & a soft brush. If you really cherish these coins, then I would not attempt in cleaning them anymore than this. If you are willing to take the risk and possibly ruin the coins, there are several cleaning methods out there but none are going to make your coins look new. I wouldn't chance it!

  5. #5
    us
    Jul 2010
    Garrett Ace 250, Bounty Hunter Quick Draw
    1,371
    273 times
    Coin roll hunting, British coins, ancient coins, antiquities
    I don't think that these Hungarian denars are very high grade silver, and I think that often the alloy was improperly mixed. Those coins with higher grade silver are likely to be much better looking, while those with more copper have likely corroded. It looks like your coins on the left have a lot more copper in them than the one on the right, thus it looks "better". Since most of these hammered coins are dug coins, the silver won't be affected by the ground moisture as much as the base metal ones.

    Sometimes these lower-grade silver coins have been plated with silver so that they look better and look like higher-grade silver and so those with full silvering will look better than a coin which had its plating worn or flecked off. Although I'm not sure if these coins were, there seems to be a lot for sale, but comparatively very little information on them.

    For example, here's a British (Edward I) sterling penny:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Edward-I-penny.jpg 
Views:	356 
Size:	108.3 KB 
ID:	807000

    Which is in fairly good preservation because of its high silver content.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Henry-VIII_11.jpg 
Views:	356 
Size:	131.9 KB 
ID:	807003

    This, on the other hand is a Henry VIII testoon (shilling) made out of debased (about 1/3 silver, 2/3 copper) and even though its nearly 400 years younger than the Edward I above, it is in worse condition because the elements attack copper more readily than they do silver, so the coin is partially porous and has a worse colour.
    Speeding up Gresham's law one roll at a time

  6. #6
    us
    Jun 2013
    East Tennessee
    6,953
    6715 times
    Clean them with Acetone! Never use vinegar, especially on old Medieval Silver coins as it can pit them and since most contain some amounts of copper, it can bring the Copper color to the surface of the coin.


    Frank

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Generic_Lad View Post
    I don't think that these Hungarian denars are very high grade silver, and I think that often the alloy was improperly mixed. Those coins with higher grade silver are likely to be much better looking, while those with more copper have likely corroded. It looks like your coins on the left have a lot more copper in them than the one on the right, thus it looks "better". Since most of these hammered coins are dug coins, the silver won't be affected by the ground moisture as much as the base metal ones.

    Sometimes these lower-grade silver coins have been plated with silver so that they look better and look like higher-grade silver and so those with full silvering will look better than a coin which had its plating worn or flecked off. Although I'm not sure if these coins were, there seems to be a lot for sale, but comparatively very little information on them.

    For example, here's a British (Edward I) sterling penny:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Edward-I-penny.jpg 
Views:	356 
Size:	108.3 KB 
ID:	807000

    Which is in fairly good preservation because of its high silver content.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Henry-VIII_11.jpg 
Views:	356 
Size:	131.9 KB 
ID:	807003

    This, on the other hand is a Henry VIII testoon (shilling) made out of debased (about 1/3 silver, 2/3 copper) and even though its nearly 400 years younger than the Edward I above, it is in worse condition because the elements attack copper more readily than they do silver, so the coin is partially porous and has a worse colour.
    Henry V111 coinage was one of the poorest in English coinage, hence the reason he was dubbed old copper nose, because his nose would turn green because of the copper cores in his coins. The coins in the post are all probably billon, and unless they have a good silver coating, it would be best leaving them be.

    SS
    Generic_Lad and lastleg like this.

  8. #8

    Apr 2013
    36
    5 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    These coins are antique and very valuable from historic viewpoint. I’d suggest not taking a chance by cleaning them and trying to make them look like new.

  9. #9
    us
    Jan 2012
    Maryland
    White's Coinmaster
    5,932
    754 times
    Coin Roll Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by vanguardcapital View Post
    I Think That
    Lemon Juice seems to work best on the earlier better silver coins.Even those I am hesitant to soak longer than 5-10 minutes at a time.
    The later types,esp. where there silver is less pure, I've had good success with coca cola.
    Nice short soaks did well.
    The value of the coin is ruined. I have never had luck with coca-cola, when I tried it on common coins. I put in a common German pfennig that was rusted, came out identical after 2 days.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by vanguardcapital View Post
    I Think That
    Lemon Juice seems to work best on the earlier better silver coins.Even those I am hesitant to soak longer than 5-10 minutes at a time.
    The later types,esp. where there silver is less pure, I've had good success with coca cola.
    Nice short soaks did well.
    I have had ancient hammered coins in lemon juice for over week.....it does no harm what so ever.

    SS
    Don't piss down my back, then tell me it's raining.

  11. #11
    au
    Oct 2012
    Australia
    Garrett Ace 250, Garrett AT Pro, Vulcan 360 Pinpointer, Geotech Barracuda Pi, Minelab Sovereign GT, Minelab Explorer 2, bounty hunter pinpointer,
    77
    95 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I found a way to make them look silver again. I did a experiment at school today with potassium persulfate. In a couple of seconds it was silver again.
    I will post some pictures later

  12. #12
    au
    Oct 2012
    Australia
    Garrett Ace 250, Garrett AT Pro, Vulcan 360 Pinpointer, Geotech Barracuda Pi, Minelab Sovereign GT, Minelab Explorer 2, bounty hunter pinpointer,
    77
    95 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Here are the results of potassium perfulfate. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	potassiumpersulfate.png 
Views:	230 
Size:	2.53 MB 
ID:	833068

 

 

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Help identify French medieval silver coins
    By mindcrime1988 in forum Coins
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Nov 19, 2012, 12:20 PM
  2. St. Martins Day, Hungary - Medieval silver ring, coins...
    By garryson in forum Today's Finds!
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Nov 18, 2012, 11:30 AM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Aug 09, 2011, 01:13 PM
  4. Silver coins, Medieval buckle and other relics...
    By Bavaria Mike in forum Today's Finds!
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jun 23, 2008, 06:07 PM
  5. CACHE OF MEDIEVAL SILVER COINS DISCOVERED!
    By Sergei Upstate in forum Cache Hunting
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: May 01, 2005, 10:31 PM

Search tags for this page

cleaning medieval coins
,
cleaning pennies with spit and tinfoil
,
cleaning porous coins
,
how can you restore the silver content on a medieval hammered silver coin?
,
how do u know if its copper or silver?
,
how do u onow when u find copper with a garrett ace 250 metal detector
,
how to clean a hammered coin with tin foil
,
how to get copper looking good
,

medieval coins henry 2

,
spit and tin foil for coins
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0