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  1. #16
    us
    Jun 2008
    Vale, Oregon
    Nokta Impact (2), FORS Relic (3), FORS CoRe (2) Makro Racer 2 Tesoro Vaquero, Bandido II µMAX, Silver Sabre µMAX & Mojave Makro and Nokta Pinpointers Killer-B 'Hornet' headphones
    26
    23 times
    Relic Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by SeekerProB
    I have realized that I am going through way to many batteries and want to do something better.
    You have me wondering what batteries you have been using with your AT Pro? I also wonder what you consider to be "way too many batteries" related to how much detecting time. A long-period of detecting day-after-day, or a combination of days when you only detect for ±2 hours? Do you use headphones which can help reduce a certain amount of the battery drain?

    I've been at this great sport for well over half-a-century, and when I was younger I put in many long search periods. My days off I was frequently spending full days working Relic Hunting sites, or if limited to Coin Hunting urban locations I was still doing 8 to 10 hours a day. Up until about two decades ago I was frequently testing all sorts of brands of Regular, Heavy Duty and Alkaline batteries, and during the mid-to-late '80s I found a few brands of Heavy Duty batteries that lasted quite long, and cost-wise were more affordable than many Alkaline batteries.

    Most of the rechargeable batteries around were NiCad and quality Alkaline batteries way out-lasted the NiCad and were more affordable, and easily available. By the latter '90s we saw more metal detectors trending to Tone ID and Target ID and other functions like backlighted displays that would draw more battery power. More digital designed detectors, but that didn't seem to lengthen battery life. Instead it's been more the opposite.

    If I only had one detector, and that was all that used AA batteries, I might just power it up with the Eneloop rechargeable batteries I have on-hand, but will likely sell them. I got them with a detector purchase and used them for maybe 6 hours to compare the drain-rate against some Alkaline batteries I was comparing, then put them away with the charger.

    In my Regular-Use Detector Outfit I have two Tesoro's and a Teknetics Omega 8000 that require 1 9-Volt battery each. But I need a supply of AA Alkaline batteries on-hand for most of my detectors: 2-each for my 2 Fisher F44's, 4-each for my 2 Nokta FORS CoRe and 2 FORS Relic and a Teknetics T2+, and 8 for my White's MXT All-Pro. In addition, I have flashlights that are AA powered as well: 3-each for the one at my desk, 4-each for one in my 'outdoor' closet and one in one vehicle, 9-each for the one in my critter-hunting gear, another in my bedroom and a 3rd in my living room, and 9-each in my emergency-use flashlight. Also, two new lights in my Emergency Supply Tote that take 4-each and 6-each.

    I also need AA batteries for my Blood Pressure monitors, emergency radio and probably something else that doesn't come to mind. Oh, 3-each for the two lanterns, one that's kept in my first aid tote and another that's in my TV room. I also have two flashlights that are rechargeable with Lithium batteries, three from Duracell that require 'C' cells, and I need AAA alkaline batteries for my GMRS radios, 3 smaller flashlights I have located around the house and 7 or 8 brand new ones in my Emergency Supply Tote.

    But we're only talking about AA Alkaline batteries to power our detectors, and other gear, and in my Emergency Supply Tote I have another container, my Battery Tote. In there I have other batteries, but my biggest supply is 745, at least weeks count, of AA Alkaline Batteries. I don't need Rechargeable batteries with all my power-required sources. Besides, my detectors provide me with very good run-time with decent Alkaline Batteries, and they are easily available to keep the operating cost low.

    My favorite AA alkaline batteries are Duracell, but the same maker also produces the Kirkland house brand for Costco at a much lower retail price. A 3rd battery that is affordable and works well for me are the ones I buy at Albertson's grocery. A 60-pack costs a little under $11. At $10.95 a pack that amounts to 18¼¢ per battery, so to fill an 8-AA Alkaline battery system it only comes to $1.46. I usually get ± 40 hours of operating time, but let's say your detector only gave you 20 hours of service. That would end up costing less than 7½¢ per hour, and if that's not cheap enough to afford a decent Alkaline battery at an affordable price, another hobby might be better.

    And that's figuring it with an 8-AA powered detector only providing 20 hours of service. I only have one of those models right now. I have 5 workhorse detectors that only require 4-AA's each, and all of them provide well over 20 hours of run-time each, easily, so my get-serious hunting is costing me no more than 3¾¢ per-hour.

    And some of those 745 brand new packs of AA Alkaline batteries might not work as long as a Duracell or Kirkland or other top maker, but they have also met the run-times I mentioned and I buy them on sale in 36 or 48 packs making each battery cost 10½¢ to under 14¢ each.

    Sorry to ramble, but I use a lot of AA batteries so I am cost efficient, keep an ample supply, and use brands that hold up well in my detectors and other devices. Either your Garrett AT Pro is a power-hungry device, or you are not using a decent Alkaline battery if you're having issues with short battery life. So, either get a different detector, change to a better Alkaline battery, or go with a Rechargeable battery. But keep in mind that if your unit is going through good Alkalines quickly, then you're going to be removing and recharging the other batteries frequently.

    Therefore, my suggestions if you want to go rechargeable are #1.. the RnB batteries or #2.. the individual Eneloop.

    Monte
    A2coins likes this.
    "Your eyes, the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"
    Stinkwater Wells
    Trading Post
    For metal detector and detecting information and knowledge.
    A 'how-to' source hosting seminars and helping individuals
    to learn and have fun today to create their own memories.


    monte@stinkwaterwells.com or monte@ahrps.org
    503-481-8147

  2. #17

    Mar 2019
    6
    3 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Monte View Post
    You have me wondering what batteries you have been using with your AT Pro? I also wonder what you consider to be "way too many batteries" related to how much detecting time. A long-period of detecting day-after-day, or a combination of days when you only detect for ±2 hours? Do you use headphones which can help reduce a certain amount of the battery drain?

    I've been at this great sport for well over half-a-century, and when I was younger I put in many long search periods. My days off I was frequently spending full days working Relic Hunting sites, or if limited to Coin Hunting urban locations I was still doing 8 to 10 hours a day. Up until about two decades ago I was frequently testing all sorts of brands of Regular, Heavy Duty and Alkaline batteries, and during the mid-to-late '80s I found a few brands of Heavy Duty batteries that lasted quite long, and cost-wise were more affordable than many Alkaline batteries.

    Most of the rechargeable batteries around were NiCad and quality Alkaline batteries way out-lasted the NiCad and were more affordable, and easily available. By the latter '90s we saw more metal detectors trending to Tone ID and Target ID and other functions like backlighted displays that would draw more battery power. More digital designed detectors, but that didn't seem to lengthen battery life. Instead it's been more the opposite.

    If I only had one detector, and that was all that used AA batteries, I might just power it up with the Eneloop rechargeable batteries I have on-hand, but will likely sell them. I got them with a detector purchase and used them for maybe 6 hours to compare the drain-rate against some Alkaline batteries I was comparing, then put them away with the charger.

    In my Regular-Use Detector Outfit I have two Tesoro's and a Teknetics Omega 8000 that require 1 9-Volt battery each. But I need a supply of AA Alkaline batteries on-hand for most of my detectors: 2-each for my 2 Fisher F44's, 4-each for my 2 Nokta FORS CoRe and 2 FORS Relic and a Teknetics T2+, and 8 for my White's MXT All-Pro. In addition, I have flashlights that are AA powered as well: 3-each for the one at my desk, 4-each for one in my 'outdoor' closet and one in one vehicle, 9-each for the one in my critter-hunting gear, another in my bedroom and a 3rd in my living room, and 9-each in my emergency-use flashlight. Also, two new lights in my Emergency Supply Tote that take 4-each and 6-each.

    I also need AA batteries for my Blood Pressure monitors, emergency radio and probably something else that doesn't come to mind. Oh, 3-each for the two lanterns, one that's kept in my first aid tote and another that's in my TV room. I also have two flashlights that are rechargeable with Lithium batteries, three from Duracell that require 'C' cells, and I need AAA alkaline batteries for my GMRS radios, 3 smaller flashlights I have located around the house and 7 or 8 brand new ones in my Emergency Supply Tote.

    But we're only talking about AA Alkaline batteries to power our detectors, and other gear, and in my Emergency Supply Tote I have another container, my Battery Tote. In there I have other batteries, but my biggest supply is 745, at least weeks count, of AA Alkaline Batteries. I don't need Rechargeable batteries with all my power-required sources. Besides, my detectors provide me with very good run-time with decent Alkaline Batteries, and they are easily available to keep the operating cost low.

    My favorite AA alkaline batteries are Duracell, but the same maker also produces the Kirkland house brand for Costco at a much lower retail price. A 3rd battery that is affordable and works well for me are the ones I buy at Albertson's grocery. A 60-pack costs a little under $11. At $10.95 a pack that amounts to 18¼¢ per battery, so to fill an 8-AA Alkaline battery system it only comes to $1.46. I usually get ± 40 hours of operating time, but let's say your detector only gave you 20 hours of service. That would end up costing less than 7½¢ per hour, and if that's not cheap enough to afford a decent Alkaline battery at an affordable price, another hobby might be better.

    And that's figuring it with an 8-AA powered detector only providing 20 hours of service. I only have one of those models right now. I have 5 workhorse detectors that only require 4-AA's each, and all of them provide well over 20 hours of run-time each, easily, so my get-serious hunting is costing me no more than 3¾¢ per-hour.

    And some of those 745 brand new packs of AA Alkaline batteries might not work as long as a Duracell or Kirkland or other top maker, but they have also met the run-times I mentioned and I buy them on sale in 36 or 48 packs making each battery cost 10½¢ to under 14¢ each.

    Sorry to ramble, but I use a lot of AA batteries so I am cost efficient, keep an ample supply, and use brands that hold up well in my detectors and other devices. Either your Garrett AT Pro is a power-hungry device, or you are not using a decent Alkaline battery if you're having issues with short battery life. So, either get a different detector, change to a better Alkaline battery, or go with a Rechargeable battery. But keep in mind that if your unit is going through good Alkalines quickly, then you're going to be removing and recharging the other batteries frequently.

    Therefore, my suggestions if you want to go rechargeable are #1.. the RnB batteries or #2.. the individual Eneloop.

    Monte
    I'm using the rechargeable batteries so that some poor schmuck doesn't end up having to dig up all my used AA batteries 10 years from now.

    j/k
    A2coins likes this.

  3. #18
    ca
    Feb 2014
    Sault St. Marie , Ontario Canada
    AT PRO International, Blisstool V3, Makro Multi Kruzer
    118
    78 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I never used rechargeables on my machine, but I did use recharge 9 volts on my pinpointer. What I found is that the rechargeable 9 volts were expensive and would only last about a season(sometimes less) or so before they died totally. When I tallied up the cost of the rechargeable 9 volts(two sets needed to keep one ready at all times), vs the cost of alkaline 9 volts over a season, I found there wasn't much difference in cost, if I was just smart about buying alkalines on sale and in bulk. Now obviously 9 volts are more pricey than AA's so it's a slightly different market but I urge everyone to keep track of the costs. I suspect an occasional hunter will do fine with good rechargeables but if you hunt a LOT the cost vs pain in the ass factor may not balance out for you, since rechargeables don't last forever. Either way, make sure you always carry alkaline backups! When the rechargeables die.......they die suddenly and can ruin a hunt if you don't have a backup plan.
    A2coins likes this.

  4. #19

    Mar 2019
    6
    3 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Please remember to attach an insulator to the top of an exposed 9V battery. A piece of tape or the thumb of a latex glove both work well. They can start a fire in a backpack if they touch a conductor. Personal experience here. An old GF of mine threw one in to her backpack pocket to have a spare. She also had change in that pocket. And some other stuff that would burn easily. After it was all over, the thing looked like it had been hit with a phaser blast. I told her it would have been a lot more appropriate if it had been a red backpack.
    A2coins likes this.

  5. #20
    us
    Mar 2019
    KY
    Fisher Research Labs F2
    59
    31 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by retrodog View Post
    The rechargeable batteries are overall safer for your equipment. In the rare (but has happened to me all to many times) occasion when you leave alkaline batteries in a device long-term, you get leakage. And that leakage regularly causes corrosion to occur. That's why the manufacturers of these detectors tell you to remove the batteries if you are not going to use it for over a month. The problem is, you usually just forget and when you dig it back out after a year or two, the damage has been done. The rechargeable cells are dry. They do not leak. Well I haven't had one leak anyway. So there's that.

    I like the Sanyo Eneloops. The high capacity ones have better run time than regular alkaline batteries. They also have a higher instantaneous current output. Well at least they used to. I have no idea what new alkaline technologies have come out recently.
    I believe they're now Panasonic Eneloops (still just as good, if not better). As for their high capacity ones (they go by "Pro" designation, I think and are black), they don't have the cycle life or internal resistance that's as good as the "standard" white Eneloops. They're still perfectly capable in metal detectors, though.
    A2coins likes this.

  6. #21
    us
    Mar 2019
    KY
    Fisher Research Labs F2
    59
    31 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by retrodog View Post
    Please remember to attach an insulator to the top of an exposed 9V battery. A piece of tape or the thumb of a latex glove both work well. They can start a fire in a backpack if they touch a conductor. Personal experience here. An old GF of mine threw one in to her backpack pocket to have a spare. She also had change in that pocket. And some other stuff that would burn easily. After it was all over, the thing looked like it had been hit with a phaser blast. I told her it would have been a lot more appropriate if it had been a red backpack.
    I good alternative is to use a specialized battery holder, such as one made by Storacell:

    https://www.amazon.com/Storacell-Pow...ateway&sr=8-10

    I use these with my 9V and AA batteries.
    A2coins likes this.

  7. #22
    us
    Mar 2019
    KY
    Fisher Research Labs F2
    59
    31 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Monte View Post
    You have me wondering what batteries you have been using with your AT Pro? I also wonder what you consider to be "way too many batteries" related to how much detecting time. A long-period of detecting day-after-day, or a combination of days when you only detect for ±2 hours? Do you use headphones which can help reduce a certain amount of the battery drain?

    I've been at this great sport for well over half-a-century...Therefore, my suggestions if you want to go rechargeable are #1.. the RnB batteries or #2.. the individual Eneloop.

    Monte
    I don't fully understand this post. Given how many AA battery devices you use, some of which aren't used that frequently, it sounds like AA LSD NiMH cells (such as Eneloops) would be perfect for you and you'd be ditching alkalines in most of your devices. At the very least, you'd use some Energizer Lithium primaries.

    For example, you say you have 745 alkaline batteries on hand. That's a massive supply. Assuming you didn't buy any more alkaline batteries, how long would that last you? If several years, then you're oversupplied as akalines degrade over time and by the time you use them, you risk them leaking or not giving you the same capacity as a fresh alkaline. If less than year or so you would definitely save money switching over to rechargeables.
    Last edited by mh9162013; Apr 07, 2019 at 09:05 AM.
    A2coins likes this.

  8. #23
    us
    Jun 2008
    Vale, Oregon
    Nokta Impact (2), FORS Relic (3), FORS CoRe (2) Makro Racer 2 Tesoro Vaquero, Bandido II µMAX, Silver Sabre µMAX & Mojave Makro and Nokta Pinpointers Killer-B 'Hornet' headphones
    26
    23 times
    Relic Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by mh9162013
    I don't fully understand this post. Given how many AA battery devices you use, some of which aren't used that frequently, it sounds like AA LSD NiMH cells (such as Eneloops) would be perfect for you and you'd be ditching alkalines in most of your devices. At the very least, you'd use some Energizer Lithium primaries.
    I have a lot of devices that use AA batteries, and I use most of them often enough that I want /need an adequate on-hand supply. The cost for a supply of Eneloop batteries and enough battery chargers to maintain a peak supply would definitely cost more. Also, I've found in the past that rechargeable batteries do drop off and die quickly compared with a decent Alkaline battery, and they generally did it at the worst time, such as when I was a farther walk back to my vehicle to change them out. Alkaline batteries will start to weaken slowly as you're getting near the end of their service life which allows a good alert so you can changer them out soon or be prepared.

    In my metal detectors, 9 of which rely on AA batteries, it can be an annoyance when out working an area on a long-day hunt. But when it's dark and you're relying on AA's to power a flashlight, most generally put to use when it is dark and often when you're out of the home or not immediately in camp, it can be a bigger pain-in-the-arse. I therefore prefer a decent Alkaline battery, and am prepared to change them out when alerted when they indicate they are weakening, but well before they're exhausted.


    Quote Originally Posted by mh9162013
    For example, you say you have 745 alkaline batteries on hand. That's a massive supply.
    True, it is quite a few, but I do use batteries often enough to change them out when needed, but a battery supply I treat the same as I do gas in my vehicles. I don't wait until I run out of gas to go to a station to fill up. Instead, I use my 'supply' (gas in the tank) as needed and when it gets low (not the power level but the supply I might need) I fill my tank.


    Quote Originally Posted by mh9162013
    Assuming you didn't buy any more alkaline batteries, how long would that last you?
    Well, first I'll address the 'assumption' part by saying I DO and WILL buy more batteries, as needed, when I come across a really good deal on serviceable Alkaline batteries. Today I have the ±745 Alkaline batteries in my supply tote. This past week I did deplete it by 4 to refill a Nokta Relic that ran down just as the rain arrived, as well as one flashlight I use a lot in the evenings for trips to the woodshed, my vehicle, or out with my dog. I just got a new blood pressure monitor so that will use up 4 more from my supply, and as the year progresses there are certainly going to be more times I'll thin out my supply so I'll want to keep it stocked up for future needs.

    When I get new packs of batteries I also use a permanent marker to label them so I use them up in the order acquired so they don't get old and stale. I do have two packages of batteries in my tote that are a few of years old, and for a reason. I decided to monitor a pack of Duracell batteries against what I got in run-time from a duplicate package I acquired at the same time. On the packages and/or batteries the manufacturer shows a 'Good By:' or 'Use By:' date.

    With many of the batteries manufactured in recent years, and I refer to quality batteries, that is often a healthy period of 'shelf-life' compared to what batteries used to last. So my plan for that package of Alkaline AA's is to wait until the shelf-life date and then start using them to compare their operation time. I'll know how much faith to put in a shelf-life date and see if there is a significant loss in useable run-time.

    By the way, I just dug in my battery supply to double check the shelf-life on that pack of 40 AA Duracell Alkaline batteries and it reads:
    "Guaranteed for 10 Years." The package was made in 2013 and I have owned this package since June of 2014 so it has been in my tote for almost 5 years. The package also reads: "Best Before 2023" which tells me they were made and packaged in 2013. I acquired them and the already used-up package of Duracell's in mid-2014. And to meet the 'Best Before 2023' indication I'll open this package up sometime towards the end of 2022 ... 2½ years from now!

    Today, my current detector outfit would use 4 AA's each for my four Nokta CoRe and Relic models and a Teknetics T2+. 2 AA's each for my two Fisher F44's, so that gets me to 24 batteries, and then 8 AA's for each of my White's models, making 16 + 24 and that would total to 40. If I have the same or comparable Outfit at that time, I'll open the Duracell batteries and fill ALL of my detectors, then monitor their run-time until that 10 Year Old package of batteries expires and know how good the shelf-life is.

    Also, I noted the 60 count pack of Alkalines I bought at Albertsons grocery. They are manufactured here in the USA, and the package reads a 10 Year guaranteed life as well, and they should be installed by 12-2026. I bought this package in early 2017, about three years ago. I wonder how good 60 Eneloop AA rechargeable batteries would be if they would have been fully charged and packaged at the same time in 2016? Very useful or dependable when opened around Christmas time seven years from now?



    Quote Originally Posted by mh9162013
    If several years, then you're oversupplied as akalines degrade over time and by the time you use them, you risk them leaking or not giving you the same capacity as a fresh alkaline.
    I don't think I am 'over-supplied' only 'well supplied.' I have been using, comparing and monitoring AA batteries and 9-V batteries for decades. I have only experience leaking AA Alkaline batteries on two occasions. One was in a White's Classic ID I bought used, and the 8-AA package had mixed battery brands, plus two of them were installed backwards! Not the battery's fault for time decay. The other was another detector I got from a fellow who had left the batteries in his detector, unused for a few years leaning against the wall. That's also a different example because the batteries were installed in the battery holder, making contact, and there could have been some degree of battery drain.

    I have NEVER had a package of quality-made Alkaline batteries show any leakage. Besides, I do go through batteries often enough to use them up before they could go bad, with the exception of the 'time test' I am doing with the Duracell batteries.

    Additionally, I don't use all of the Alkaline batteries I have in my supply. While it is my 'supply' and I stock it up with fresh batteries as it gets a little depleted, it is also for emergency purposes, such as the flashlights, blood pressure monitor, radios, etc., and not just for fun-to-use metal detectors. But I also draw from it off-and-on during the course of a year for different reasons:

    • Sometimes on a Welcome-to-Hunt Outing there will be one or more participants who don't bring extra, or don't bring any, spare batteries. Their detector dies, and I have batteries to get them back-in-the-hunt.

    • Often I will have someone on an Outing decide they ought to have an extra package of batteries for future use to 'be prepared' so I'll sell them a package of 30 or 48 batteries. And at the same bargain price I was able to buy them for, too.

    • In most of the metal detecting seminars I do I will use one or two packages of batteries as a Free Give-Away to people who have the right answers to some questions, or a close guess of the number of coins I have in a jar on display. I also gave away a package of Alkaline batteries at some of the metal detecting club meetings when I gave a presentation.

    So, yes, I have quite a supply of batteries, but as mentioned before I also have many, many devices that rely on them. I like being prepared, and I use some as giveaways/prizes so I do go through my supply during the course of a year.


    Quote Originally Posted by mh9162013
    If less than year or so you would definitely save money switching over to rechargeables.
    Nope. In the long run it hasn't worked for me, costs too much, and I like to avoid the frustrations of the almost immediate 'Quit!' behavior of most rechargeable batteries in metal detectors. Besides, not enough $$$ in my pocket to be giving away packages of batteries, or supplying people with rechargeable batteries on an Outing. I'm just fine with good Alkaline's.

    Monte
    "Your eyes, the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"
    Stinkwater Wells
    Trading Post
    For metal detector and detecting information and knowledge.
    A 'how-to' source hosting seminars and helping individuals
    to learn and have fun today to create their own memories.


    monte@stinkwaterwells.com or monte@ahrps.org
    503-481-8147

  9. #24
    au
    Jul 2008
    TNQ
    327
    88 times
    Rechargeable Li-ion.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    ivanll
    A2coins likes this.

  10. #25
    us
    Mar 2019
    KY
    Fisher Research Labs F2
    59
    31 times
    Metal Detecting
    What kind of Li-Ion cells are those? It says 1.5V on the cell.
    A2coins likes this.

  11. #26
    us
    Mar 2019
    KY
    Fisher Research Labs F2
    59
    31 times
    Metal Detecting
    Monte,

    You certainly have made some good points about using alkalines. I don't agree with all of them, but it's your money and your devices and that's cool. I would like to mention a few things, though.

    First, I think you would save money by switching over to rechargeables, at least in the long run. Granted, it might take a while (several years), but I think you use them enough that after a few dozen charge cycles, they will have paid for themselves. And yes, it might be a pretty expensive initial investment of several hundred dollars, but I don't think you would be losing money by switching over at least part of your AA battery supply to rechargeables.

    Second, I'm still using my first generation Eneloops from circa 2005/2006 and they work just fine. I don't know how much their performance has suffered, but they're still providing performance that mirrors brand new Eneloops from what I can tell. I would estimate that I've put maybe a few dozen cycles through them, as they are usually relegated to lower used devices, like my graphic calculator or emergency flashlights.

    Third, I think you make a great point about alkalines giving you some warning before they die. NiMH cells certainly do not provide the gradual decay in performance like alkalines do. However, you seem like a very organized and conscientious battery user, so one way around this would be automatically swapping out used rechargeables with fully charged ones. I'm not saying you should do this or you're lazy if you don't. I'm just stating it because it seems like you enjoy organizing and managing your batteries (as do I), so it seems like it would be an added task that you don't mind doing.

    EDIT: I found some data from https://eneloop101.com about how Eneloops can get thousands (tested up to 5,000) cycles of life. Direct source of test results are here: http://www.ultrasmartcharger.com/php...c.php?f=5&t=91 A few caveats are that these aren't full charge/discharge cycles (but still enough to compare to actual use). Also, there were no rest periods between the cycles. But using a conservative number of say, 2,000 cycles - at 10 cents per alkaline cell, that means one Eneloop (which costs about $2-$3 per cell) is the equivalent of almost $200 worth of alkalines (I say almost, because it costs a few hundredths (or less) or a cent or so per charge per cell).
    Last edited by mh9162013; Apr 10, 2019 at 10:56 PM. Reason: Added info about tests
    A2coins likes this.

  12. #27
    us
    Aug 2018
    Central Florida
    Garrett At Pro
    242
    172 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by mh9162013 View Post
    What kind of Li-Ion cells are those? It says 1.5V on the cell.
    They're standard Li-on with a buck to bring them to 1.5v. Kentli and Tenavolt sell them. They're probably made by K2.

  13. #28
    us
    Mar 2019
    KY
    Fisher Research Labs F2
    59
    31 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Darke View Post
    They're standard Li-on with a buck to bring them to 1.5v. Kentli and Tenavolt sell them. They're probably made by K2.
    Sounds inefficient.

  14. #29
    us
    Aug 2018
    Central Florida
    Garrett At Pro
    242
    172 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by mh9162013 View Post
    Sounds inefficient.
    They'd be good for high draw devices. But not being shielded is a problem for some things. Aside from fast charging not really sure they'd have any other benefit for a metal detector. They seem to be about 1700 MaH and wouldn't trigger the low battery warning but they'll also die without triggering the warning. This is the buck they're using.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  15. #30
    us
    Mar 2019
    KY
    Fisher Research Labs F2
    59
    31 times
    Metal Detecting
    Based on some Amazon reviews, it seems like they're not the best for high current draw applications.

 

 
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