The Hatton Ferry
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  1. #1
    hu
    Gypsyheart~ Queen of Rust

    Nov 2005
    Ozarks
    12,686
    272 times

    The Hatton Ferry


    Hatton Ferry is a poled ferry that crosses the James River at a site named Hatton about three and one-fourth miles south west of Scottsville, Virginia. James A. Brown, a storekeeper, began operating a ferry at this location in the late 1870's. In 1906, James Benson Tindall of Buckingham rented Brown's store and then purchased the ferry and store from Brown's descendants in September 1914. Tindall managed Hatton Ferry operations until 1940 when he deeded the ferry to the State of Virginia. Today in 2004, Hatton Ferry operates on a weekend schedule from April to October and is managed by the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society, Albemarle County, and the Virginia Department of Transportation.

    The Hatton ferryboat is flat-bottomed with a deck hovering a few inches above the waterline. A stout cable is attached to one of the boat's ends and guided by an overhead wire connecting the two river banks about 700 feet away. One cable allows the stern to swing gently downstream, following the current. The other ******s a similar reaction by the prow, and together the cables control the craft in its river passage and harness the natural power of the river. The boat caught at an angle by the current, floats steadily across the river. As the ferry approaches the riverbank, the ferryman cranks a hand winch to roll up the cable at the boat's stern. With a few jabs of the ferryman's pole at the trip's end, the ferry slips onto its riverbank landing.

    In the 1910 photo above, Hatton Ferry is shown crossing the James River to the Buckingham shore. James Tindall and Eugene Layne, his business partner, rode in the buggy at the ferry's rear. Standing with her three children on the ferry were Sarah Frances Napier, wife of the Hatton ferryman, Joseph Napier. At the front of the ferry, G.A. Tapscott, a Civil War veteran and future father-in-law of James Tindall, drove the lead buggy.

    In the ferry's early years, its traffic consisted of wagons, buggies, horses, cattle, sheep, farm equipment, lumber, and farm produce. Men were hired to operate the ferry from 'sun to sun' seven days per week; each was paid a salary and furnished with a certain amount of groceries, flour, and sugar to support his family. Since 1906, ferrymen operating Hatton Ferry include Joe Napier, Bolling Bryant, Monroe Napier, Luther Randolph, Harvey Briddle, Raymond Hackett, and Ned Hocker. They became skilled at keeping the ferry afloat even with wagons heavily loaded with railroad ties destined for train pickup at Hatton Station. It was not hard to sink a ferry boat, and if the front end was loaded too heavily, the current took hold of the ferry and sent it straight to the bottom. One day, disaster was narrowly averted when the ferry was loaded with timber and donkeys. One of the donkeys, tied to another, tried to drink from the James and thus pulled both animals dangerously close to the ferry's edge. A quick-thinking ferryman cut the lines holding the donkeys together and saved the boat from a dangerous situation with an unbalanced load.

    Another ferryman, Harvey Briddle, who started as Hatton's ferryman in 1932, is noted for superb dedication to Hatton Ferry for many years; he was the main character in one of the most exciting stories in Hatton's history. In 1940, the ferry broke loose from its moorings during high water and headed downstream in a debris-filled and raging river. Ferryman Briddle knew that replacing a boat was a huge expense and so set off after the ferry in a canoe. He caught up with the ferry, and, although his legs were crippled and he could not swim a stroke, Harvey hopped onto the ferryboat and tried to pole it to safety along the shoreline. The ferry poles, however, were not long enough to touch the river's bottom in the high water, and Harvey could not veer it from its course. As they approached Scottsville, Harvey was convinced the ferryboat would crash into the town's bridge abutment, and break in two. So he jumped back into his canoe and followed the ferryboat, which miraculously emerged unscratched on the other side of the bridge before beaching two miles further down river. Meanwhile back at Hatton, the Tindall family did not know what had happened to Harvey, a dear family friend; they feared he was dead. Jim Tindall, Jr., drove a truck to Scottsville to search for Harvey and bring him home, but returned later in the day without spotting the brave ferryman. About 5 p.m., the Tindalls gathered on their front porch overlooking Hatton and reminisced about their dear Harvey, whom they thought had drowned. Suddenly, the Tindalls spotted Harvey coming up the Hatton road and learned the rest of the day's story. Harvey finally caught up with the ferryboat and moored it safely two miles down river from Scottsville. Then he canoed two miles back upstream to Scottsville and caught a ride back home to Hatton. The Tindalls were thrilled to have Harvey, their beloved ferryman, safely home. However, the boat was destroyed by swirling floodwaters after Harvey returned home that day, and a replacement ferryboat was ordered and put into commission at Hatton several months later.

    In September of 1870, Buckingham County authorities issued a court order to maintain a public ferry across the James River to the Albemarle lands of Thomas P. Gantt near Totier Creek. Three years later, Gantt sold 18 acres of river front property to James A. Brown, who built a small general store there. With the land purchase came the ferry rights established by Buckingham County. Brown, however, ran into trouble with the land owners on the Buckingham side of the river when they informed him and their county board of supervisors that they did not want ferry traffic across their property. Although Brown sought legal help, the Buckingham land owners continued to protest.

    In the late 1870's, James A. Brown rented a river front parcel of land, located three and one-fourth miles from Scottsville and belonging to S.P. Gantt of Albemarle County. Although Brown owned river front property near Totier Creek and operated a general store and ferry service there, landowners on the Buckingham side the river were adamantly opposed to the ferry traffic he generated across their property. Unable to turn that opposition around even with legal action, Brown moved his store and ferry upstream to its new site near Lock 24 of the James River and Kanawha Canal. He later purchased this land from Gantt in 1881, and the site became known generally as Brown's, Brown's Store, or Brown's Landing.

    Over the next decade, Brown's became a thriving transportation hub on the James River. In 1881, Richmond and Allegheny Railroad established a train stop there. Two years later, Albemarle County authorized a public road to be built from Brown's Landing to an established county highway. A few months later, a post office began operation from Brown's Store. However, the post office's arrival necessitated a new name because there was already a Brown's Post Office operating in northwestern Albemarle; two Brown's Post Offices in the same county would have caused considerable confusion. Thus Brown named the post office 'Hatton' in honor of Frank Hatton, whose signature as assistant U.S. Postmaster General appeared on postal documents at that time. In 1889, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad took over railroad service through Hatton and erected a depot there two years later; they named it Hatton Station. By the late 1890's, Brown's ferry, too, was more commonly referred to as the 'ferry at Hatton' or Hatton Ferry. Each Hatton business thrived because of the totality of services provided at this location: timber and farm produce were ferried across the river and loaded onto freight trains at Hatton; at the store, ferry customers picked up mail and merchandise shipped into Hatton via train; and the ferry itself provided a vital transportation link between Buckingham and Albemarle Counties.

    When Brown died in 1896, Hatton operations were continued by Brown's daughter, Cora, and her husband, Edwin Raine until 1906 when James Benson Tindall of Buckingham rented Brown's Store. By 1909, Tindall was appointed Postmaster of Hatton and actively involved in Hatton station and ferry management. He enlisted Eugene Layne, an old Buckingham friend, as his business partner. In September 1914, Tindall purchased Hatton Ferry, the landing on both sides of the river, and all ferry boats, lines, and oars; the store, and about five acres of land surrounding the store and land. Jim's brother, Lewis Tindall, became his new partner in 1916 when Eugene Layne returned to Buckingham farm life.

    In 1940, Tindall deeded Hatton Ferry to the State of Virginia, who took over its operation as part of the state's system of highways. By 1970, the cost of operating and maintaining Hatton ferry exceeded its revenue, and there was much talk of discontinuing service by Albemarle and Buckingham, who shared the Hatton costs equally. In 1972, Hurricane Agnes destroyed the ferry and almost ended service. An interested public led by James Tindall, Jr., Peter Way, Raymon Thacker, Bernard Chamberlain, Daniel Van Clief, and other Albemarle citizens persuaded authorities to continue this historic ferry. A new ferry was built by the Virginia Department of Transportation, and it was rededicated in September 1973, with the assistance of Richard Thomas, star of the TV series, "The Waltons." Shown at left is Richard Thomas seated between Mrs. Doris Hamner and Bernard Chamberlain of the Albemarle County Historical Society as they rode across the river on Hatton Ferry.
    .

    Material on the 1870-1900 years of Hatton Ferry operation were drawn from The Ferries of Albemarle by John Hammond Moore (Charlottesville, VA: The Magazine of Albemarle County History, Vol. 42, pp. 1-22, 1984). Information on the Tindall years of ownership (1914-1940) come from the personal files and memories of James B. Tindall, Jr. Included in his files are several newspaper clippings about Hatton Ferry and include the following articles: "Hand Ferry Away!" by Hugh Robertson (undated, newspaper unknown); an unnamed article by Ed Booth, The Richmond News Leader (undated news clipping); "Hatton and Warren Ferries May Be Entering Last Days" by Allen Hale (February 23, 1968; unidentified newspaper); and "Historical James Ferries Praised During Hearing" (Daily Progress, Charlottesville, dated circa 1973). Details of the purchase of Hatton Ferry by James Benson Tindall from Edwin and Cora (Brown) Raine are contained in Albemarle County Deed Book 157, pp. 88-95 (Albemarle County Land Records, Charlottesville, VA.)
    http://scottsvillemuseum.com/transpo...eB69cdB16.html

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    I go a great distance,while some are considering whether they will start today or tomorrow

  2. #2
    us
    "WP"

    May 2005
    Saint Petersburg, FL
    White's IDX Pro, Vibraprobe 570, Minelab Explorer XS w/ Sunray X-1 Probe & Sunray Stealth X-12 DD Coil
    3,550
    138 times
    History, Metal Detecting, and Survival & Self-Sufficiency

    Re: The Hatton Ferry

    Another great story Gyps... and a neat pic as well! Now you've got two posts on Floyd Mann's newsletter... lol
    You and them awesome stories... keep 'em coming!!

    Bran <><
    Rom. 10:9 that if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved;

    Rom. 10:10 for with the heart a person believes, resulting in righteousness, and with the mouth he confesses, resulting in salvation.

  3. #3

    Dec 2005
    USA
    164
    3 times

    Re: The Hatton Ferry

    Hello Gypsy many, many times I have tried to answer your post and when submitted been unable to post, Hope you are doing well.
    Maybe if you pm'd I could get my thoughts through.
    SS
    Life is too short to be grumpy always look at the silver lining, and stay focused.

    I haven&#39;t failed, I&#39;ve found 10,000 ways that don&#39;t work.

  4. #4
    us
    Feb 2007
    Mechanicsville
    Fisher CZ 70
    95
    17 times

    Re: The Hatton Ferry

    Great article......Gypsyheart
    imagine the possible lost treasure over the years.
    THE OUTER BANKS WILL ALWAYS BE MY HOME; GOOD FRIENDS, GOOD FOOD, AND GOOD BEACHES.
    DANNY (OBX)

  5. #5

    Dec 2005
    USA
    164
    3 times

    Re: The Hatton Ferry

    Quote Originally Posted by StickShift
    Hello Gypsy many, many times I have tried to answer your post and when submitted been unable to post, Hope you are doing well.
    Maybe if you pm'd I could get my thoughts through.
    SS
    I found my problem, it was my keyboard, I have a very sensitive keyboard, when I type a message my left hand is near the shift/control keys and if my hand or finger barely touch either key my message dissappears before I can finish typing it.

    I have about give up.

    Now maybe I can finish before I mess up again, what I was trying to say was, You have an amazing ability for research, and the place you describe here is about 2 hours drive from the area I live at the present time.
    Have you, or are you planning to hunt that area?

    I thought about going and hunting the area, but didn't want to search the area that you have spent so much time researching before you get the opportunity to do so first.
    I have to get me a new keyboard, this one has had it, it takes forever to get a message written.
    SS
    Life is too short to be grumpy always look at the silver lining, and stay focused.

    I haven&#39;t failed, I&#39;ve found 10,000 ways that don&#39;t work.

  6. #6
    hu
    Gypsyheart~ Queen of Rust

    Nov 2005
    Ozarks
    12,686
    272 times

    Re: The Hatton Ferry

    Quote Originally Posted by StickShift
    Quote Originally Posted by StickShift
    Hello Gypsy many, many times I have tried to answer your post and when submitted been unable to post, Hope you are doing well.
    Maybe if you pm'd I could get my thoughts through.
    SS
    I found my problem, it was my keyboard, I have a very sensitive keyboard, when I type a message my left hand is near the shift/control keys and if my hand or finger barely touch either key my message dissappears before I can finish typing it.

    I have about give up.

    Now maybe I can finish before I mess up again, what I was trying to say was, You have an amazing ability for research, and the place you describe here is about 2 hours drive from the area I live at the present time.
    Have you, or are you planning to hunt that area?

    I thought about going and hunting the area, but didn't want to search the area that you have spent so much time researching before you get the opportunity to do so first.
    I have to get me a new keyboard, this one has had it, it takes forever to get a message written.
    SS
    I have no plans on hunting the area....I want to be able to provide as many hunting places for the members of TNET as I possibley can. I definitely have my own secret spots that I am hunting and dont share...LOL...... I have had several people from here share with me their finds in exchange for sending them to the right spot.
    I just love research as much as I do hunting and hope everyone gets to find something great in their lifetime!
    Good Luck if you go and make sure you post your finds!
    And hopefully you get a new keyboard!!
    I go a great distance,while some are considering whether they will start today or tomorrow

  7. #7

    Dec 2005
    USA
    164
    3 times

    Re: The Hatton Ferry

    Thanks Gypsy, Don't know when I may be able to go, if I did it would
    be the fall, or winter season.
    If I do and find anything you will surely receive a share.
    I have noticed for a long time your posts and the great help you have been to others with your research, some day it will pay off.
    Thanks again, have a wonderful week.
    SS
    Life is too short to be grumpy always look at the silver lining, and stay focused.

    I haven&#39;t failed, I&#39;ve found 10,000 ways that don&#39;t work.

  8. #8

    Jun 2007
    21,346
    13787 times

    !

    Yo! LAWD GAWD A'MIGHTY! Another walk down "memory lane" for me!! I use to go river running on the James at Hatton Ferry, as part of the James River Runners "gig" on HOT days in the summer time... U shoulda seen us... on tire inner tubes, with ANOTHER inner tube packing ICED cold beer in picnic box thingie. for @ 5 miles, we floated EAST running the river; TWO hours of "lazy-boning it, on the River". LOTS of fishes, and "old" stuff seen in the clear water, that went "back in time". U all gotta try it sometime...

  9. #9
    us
    Nov 2008
    Toll Free ~ 855~966~3563
    12,713
    129 times
    Relic Hunting
    Banner Finds (1)
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    Re: The Hatton Ferry

    Thanks again gh!

 

 

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