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Thread: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA (Photos Added)

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  1. #16
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Quote Originally Posted by aa battery
    brother back in da days of my father looking fur gold in coulterville upstream from the market dad found a 1 ounce rock. At that time it wuz $32 an ounce soooo dad didnt get much fur it . Beer, Dr. pepper, bread n lunch meat. it wuz sooo much fun
    I understand those feelings. In 1979, I had hit a pretty nice "pocket" in the river. Over 3 and 1/2 pounds of nuggets. I split it between myself and 2 friends who were helping me dredge.

    My share was just a hair over 14oz of gold. I had some property in FL that I had to take care of, so I sold my gold for $92 an oz. (Spot price then.) Imagine how I felt the following March, (1980) when spot price went up to $900 an oz.

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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Quote Originally Posted by EagleDown
    Quote Originally Posted by aa battery
    brother back in da days of my father looking fur gold in coulterville upstream from the market dad found a 1 ounce rock. At that time it wuz $32 an ounce soooo dad didnt get much fur it . Beer, Dr. pepper, bread n lunch meat. it wuz sooo much fun
    I understand those feelings. In 1979, I had hit a pretty nice "pocket" in the river. Over 3 and 1/2 pounds of nuggets. I split it between myself and 2 friends who were helping me dredge.

    My share was just a hair over 14oz of gold. I had some property in FL that I had to take care of, so I sold my gold for $92 an oz. (Spot price then.) Imagine how I felt the following March, (1980) when spot price went up to $900 an oz.
    yup

  3. #18
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    In case you're wondering, my trip was delayed 'til tomorrow. I'll be leaving around noon. Going to Northern NV, Opal hunting. Last year, I found a piece of true black Opal, with all kinds of color flashing out of it.

    I was able to cut it into 4 pieces, for jewelry. Hope to find more this trip.

    Anyway, in the meanwhile, during my latest trip to Bagby, I found that not only did CalTrans put in a new bridge, they also widened and straightened out the road, where possible, between Bagby and Coulterville. There are some places where the old hiway can be seen behind the fence on the East side of the hiway. So, the only way to get a look at the gulch is to go over the barbed wire and follow the old hiway for aways. Just don't damage the fence, it's there to keep the free ranging cattle off of the hiway.

    So, this will be my last entry in this thread until I return, in about a week.

    Next entry, we'll go meet "Hermit" Pete, about 5 miles downriver from Briceburg.

    In the meanwhile, HH and keep on looking.

    Eagle

  4. #19
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Quote Originally Posted by EagleDown
    I don't know how long ago that was, but I can believe it. Old "Hermit Pete" use to pop a couple of caps over the heads of the Forestry Rangers if they stopped their vehicles across the river from his cabin.

    Those old guys living alone can get pretty cantankerous. Especially if they have a mine that's producing a little gold.
    I find that I have an hour to kill before my partner shows up, so I thought I'd give you advance notice that I have a small tidbit about El Portel also. Got this one off of an old "local" resident of El Portel.

    But, I'll try to keep this in sequence. It'll have to wait until I introduce you to "Hermit Pete".

  5. #20
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Halito My Friends,

    Well, it has been a great week. I got to Virgin Valley, NV last Tuesday, and found that the Rainbow Opal mine was closed Wed. and Thurs., so I had 2 whole days to kill. Wednesday, I did a little metal detecting in the campground and found 82 cents, all clad of course. The following morning a new friend let me know that since it was a Federal campground, metal detecting was not allowed. Seems that it was a CC camp back in the '30s and they are afraid that MDers will take out some artifacts.

    Isn't that just like the government?? They would rather the artifacts rot in the ground than to have them on display where people would get an opportunity to see what life was like 80 years ago. *Actually I did find what I think was an artifact; a 3/8" to 1/4" adapter for a socket and ratchet. Very rusted and the particular style of the depression era. When I found out about the rules, I took it back and buried it where I had found it.

    Anyway, I'm sure you're not interested in my little vacation, I just want to let you know that I'm back. And, if I have time tonight, I'll take your hand and lead you to Briceburg and introduce you to "Hermit Pete". In the meanwhile, have a great day.

    EagleDown

  6. #21
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Hokay, it had been suggested that I try the dredging up river, just below Briceburg. So, here I am in Mariposa. I've finished getting gas, Pepsi's and ice at the Mohawk Beacon station on the North end of town. (Around 1980, the name was changed to BP.)

    I pull out on to hiway 140 and head North, towards Yosemite Nat. Park.

    Beautiful country! The first interesting place I spot is an old cedar(?) building at the junction of Triangle Rd. I couldn't help but wonder how old it was. I had done a little reading about Mariposa and had found that the court house was/is the oldest courthouse in CA, that is still in use as a courthouse. Since 1852! And, at that time, (and 125 years later,) the old belfrey clock still kept good time and the bell still rang the hour and half hour.

    Another little piece of info. was that Mariposa County was at one time, the largest county in CA, taking up parts of LA county and a good portion of San Bernardino county. If I remember correctly, it was split up into 12 other counties. If you would like to see the old courthouse, I took the link from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maripos...ty,_California

    Oops, better keep my mind on the road. Hiway 140 wasn't exactly a "Interstate Hiway" back in 1961. (Come to think of it, it still isn't.)

    The next point of interest was Mid-Pines with it's combination store and post office + 2 gas pumps, where in later years, the owner allowed me to go under the wooden front porch with my metal detector, where I picked up so many coins off of the surface, (mostly silver,) that I never did use my metal detector. I always intended to go back with my MD, but never seemed to have the time. (You might keep that in mind if you're ever passing through Mid-Pines.) I could also show you an old dump about a half mile off of the hiway, (by a paved road,) where I found old auto license plates dating back into the 30s. They were barely covered by a layer of pine needles. I left them there. I have never been a collector of artifacts, unless they are made out of gold. (Sorry, I know where the road is, but I don't remember the name of it.)

    Another mile up the hiway, on the left, is the old Muir Lodge, and just beyond that is a small bridge, (you'll have to look quick, or you'll miss it.) Just after passing over the little bridge, (Bear Creek,) there is a "turn out" where you can park before starting down the hill to Briceburg. I stopped here once in the early 80s and just for the heck of it, made about a 5 minute search with my Garrett ADS2. I picked up a 1945 Mercury dime in AU condition, under the old cedar tree, (which is still there.) You see, my interest was purely acidemic as I knew there was once a small market there. I guess they tore it down after the mines shut down in the 1920s.

    While you're looking around, look directly across Bear Creek and up the side of the hill. You should notice signs of mining there. What you're looking at is the site of the King Solomon Mine. The Colorado Book of Mining and Geology lists it as the richest mine in CA while it was in operation. I believe the Mariposa Mining Museum has some specimens on display. I've held fist sized chunks of quartz, (a friends) that 2/3 of the weight was gold. Makes my hands itch just remembering it.

    OK, we've wasted enough time here, let's get on down the hill to Briceburg.

    Tomorrow.
    Last edited by EagleDown; Apr 07, 2012 at 10:39 AM.
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  7. #22
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    O.K., about a mile before Briceburg, there's a turn-out (not paved,) where I like to stop occasionally to look down in the gulch that Bear Creek flows though on it's way to the Merced River. At the bottom is a large, fairly deep pool where the local youngsters like to gather for swimming. (And parties.)

    If you are at the right angle, at the right time of day, you might get a glimpse of a water tank that use to be on the back of a truck. The truck was used for wetting the roadway while the hiway was being put in. I once climbed down the side of the gulch, to the creek, (mostly slid down the side,) then hiked down the creek to the Merced river. Shortly after leaving the swimming hole, I came across the rest of the truck. The frame with the engine and wheels. I'm not going to try to estimate the age of the truck, but the wheels were iron rims with metal spokes. And the "tires" consisted of about 2 inches of rubber fused to the iron rims.

    Well, let's get on down to Briceburg. I'll "touch" on this area later. Including a 3 pound nugget found in the creek by a total novice. And somewhere down the line, I'll give you the low-down on that garrulous skulpher "Bedrock Bill".

    O.K., Here's the city, town, uhhh, building, of Briceburg. Yep, that's it, a house built of native river rock with an outhouse behind it and 3 or 4 cabins above (and behind) it. As we make a left turn off of the hiway, we have a stone wall on our left and a corrigated steel garage on our right.

    Briceburg once sported a gas pump and had a "pit" in the garage for working on autos. As
    of this writing, (2010) the old garage is gone. The BLM did a “Land Swap” with the Brice family and tore it down, along with the cabins. Fortunately, they retained the old stone house at the entrance to the old river road, though with minor changes.

    One of the quaint features showing the ingenuity of the “old timers” was on the front of the old house. Someone had taken ¾” water pipe and built a trellis all the way across the front of the building, then planted grape vines at each end and trained them across the top, to form a shady roof. I really loved sitting in front of the old place talking and watching the traffic pass by about 30ft. away while munching on fresh picked grapes.

    Oh well, that’s all history now. Come to think of it, with all of the pictures the French, German, Chinese, etc. tourists took of us, I guess you could say that I’m a part of history now too!!

    Doggone it, I just spent over an hour adding to this when the phone rang. While I was talking, the screen flickered and I lost it all. So, I'm going to close this out and go back to "Word" and do my typing there.

    I'll return in a bit.

    Eagle

  8. #23
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    I’m back again, finally!! I feel the need to apologize for taking so long between posts. I just never realized how busy I was, until I started writing my “memoirs”.

    So, we’re here at Briceburg and I think it’s time to load up and drive on down-river. We’ll come back up to Briceburg on occasion and review a couple of the “lost treasure” stories that Mr. Brice told me. (One of them involves a couple of coffee cans full of gold.)

    As we turn off of hiway 140 to cross the river, there is a hand-built wall on our left, also of native river rock. It’s there to keep the embankment in place, especially during the rainy seasons. There’s about 100ft of pavement here, on up to the end of the old suspension bridge. In the embankment, on the left, you can still see some old prospect holes. I never did find out how old they were, or even if anything was found.

    O.K., we’re at the bridge now and we’ll have to make a 90 degree right turn to drive onto the bridge. If you look carefully, you can see that the bridge has a slight “bow” in it. That was caused by trees hanging up on it during the flood of 1955 (or thereabouts.) But, that’s also part of another story, having to do with El Portal AND Briceburg. (lol)

    As you’re crossing the bridge, if you look down, you’ll notice that we’re about 20ft above the river, even when it’s during the annual “spring run-off”. This “might” give you an idea of the sheer volume of water that must have been coming down the river canyon during the 1955 flood. Actually, it’s almost unimaginable, even to me and I’ve seen the Merced River in flood stages many times.

    Now, we’ve crossed the bridge, where we have to make another 90 degree turn. This time, to the left. About 50ft down the road, on the right, you’ll see a fairly well maintained wood frame, split level house. This old house use to be the old Yosemite Valley RR depot. I was told that there were two trains each day, one going upriver, and one going downriver. (lol)

    Now, after about 2 miles down-river, we are at McCabe Flats. I arrived late in the evening and was met by Don Brown’s watchman. He told me that Mr. Brown had the area claimed and was mining here, but it would be OK for me to camp here, but warned, stay away from the equipment and the “shaker tables”. Otherwise, enjoy myself. And of course, no prospecting on Brown’s claims. I thanked him and invited him over to my “camp” for a glass of wine. He accepted my invitation and kept me company while I brought out my cooler and retrieved a gallon jug of some pretty good red wine out of it.

    A little “digression” here. (is that a word??) Anyway, in those days, (early 1960s,) I liked a small glass of wine before retiring for the night. So, I would stop at one of the several wineries in the San Bernardino Valley and buy it for $2.50 a gallon. (The good stuff.) They did have cheaper wines at $1.50 per gallon. (lol)

    After I got out the folding chairs, we sat and talked for a couple of hours. Nothing like a moon-lit night and a jug of wine, shared with a “watchman”, for picking up all kinds of information and history about an area. (lol)

    Of which I’ll tell you some,

    when I return to this thread. (lol)

    Eagle

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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    again, many thanks for taking the time to share part of your past and for putting
    it down on paper so great.sure does capture the immagination and the wheels
    start turning [ smile ].ok my friend, we will be waiting for some more great stories
    when you are not too busy.
    thanks much my friend take care. ron

  10. #25
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Well, it’s been a busy week for me. I sold one of my opals yesterday for cash. Now I can’t complain about being broke. But, that’s a good thing. (lol)

    Now, where was I?? Oh yeah, I’m at McCabe Flats on the beautiful Merced River.

    I woke up at my usual time the following morning, got out my trusty Coleman and fired up a pot of coffee. I noticed the old watchman was up and around, so I invited him over for a cup of coffee. We managed to kill off the whole pot while he gave me more history about the area.

    He told me that just before I get to the crossing to old Pete’s place, I would see an old, small building right beside the road. The old building was a saloon back near the end of the gold rush. In the morning, the miners kids would ride the train, (free,) to the saloon where during the daytime, it substituted as a school house. In the afternoon, the train would pick-up the kids and take them back down the river and drop them off in the area of their homes.

    An interesting little story he told me was; one night, after the saloon closed, the miners were walking back to their homes when they heard a couple of gun-shots ring out in the saloon. They ran back and found a miner ransacking the place and the owner lying on the floor, dead. Well, as you might guess, justice was swift back then. Since there was no question of his guilt, they took him out and strung him up on the nearest oak tree.

    He told me that it was well known that the saloon owner kept all of his valuables on the premises as it was too far to Mariposa and the nearest bank. At that time, there was only the saloon and a small cabin anywhere in the immediate area.
    (The saloon owner lived in the back part of the saloon and a “working girl” lived in the small cabin.)

    Later, (since the killer was still searching the place, he hadn’t found the saloon owners valuables,) the miners went in and did a thorough search of the saloon, the little cabin and the immediate surrounding area. Evidently, the saloon owner didn’t have much more than 5 minutes to hide the stuff before the killer broke in and shot him. I asked if anyone had ever found his cache, and he said that as far as anyone knew, no.

    This story was told to me by the watchman, so I’m not in anyway verifying that it’s true, and I knew that I wasn’t going out of my way to look for an undocumented treasure that had been searched for by God only knows how many people over the past 60 or 70 years. YEAH, RIGHT!! But that was several years later and you’ll have to wait ‘til I get to that part. (lol)

    Anyway, Don Brown, the owner of the claim(s) showed up about this time and the watchman introduced us, said his goodbyes then headed out in his old pick up, for home.

    An interesting man, Mr. Brown. And I should add, persistent. He had filed his claims several years before and brought in a bulldozer, a bucket dragline and other “toys” to work his claims. Not in the river, but rather, in the old alluvial channel about 25 ft. above the river and on the opposite side of the old road. If you happen to be up that way, you can still see where he dug out the ancient channel materials with the dragline. The bucket was then swung out across the road, towards the river where shaker tables were set up below a big grisly. The grisly separated the large materials and allowed the smaller stuff to feed out onto the pair of shaker tables where the gold was separated from the barren clay and soil.

    Frankly, to this day, I look at the separation process as pretty primitive. Of course, gold was only $35 an oz., so I suspect that he was actually “high-grading” the materials and wasn’t worried about what was being missed.

    Anyway, he showed me his operation and I was properly impressed. But, by this time, the sun was up and I said I wanted to go on down river and find a place to put my dredge in. He recommended a place, just barely upriver from “Railroad Flats”. (Now, like McCabe Flats, another pay campground for the BLM.) He said that if I saw ol Pete, to tell him that Don sends his regards and offer him a shot of my wine and Pete would welcome me with open arms. (lol) You’ve gotta admit that that’s a lot better than welcoming me with an old Colt 44. (lol)

    I drove slowly down the old road as there was so much to see, (in a historical sense.) I spotted several old stone………, well, I can’t call them foundations; they were actually part of the walls of small “cabins”. I had read about how the miners would build 3 or 4 ft. high walls, then build them higher by using canvas. Then they would use canvas for a roof. And I realized that this is what these were.

    It’s getting really hard to go on here, because I saw so much on my way down river. On the opposite side of the river, I could see the remains here and there of an old trail, in some places actually cut into a cliff face. (Later, I found that it was an old pack mule trail that was used long before the RR tracks were laid.)

    As I passed by Good’s Gulch, or actually, just after, on the right side of the road, there was a flat area where the “old-timers” had uncovered a good sized portion of bed-rock in an old alluvial bed and cleaned out the crevasses. The amazing part to me was; the crevasses were about 18” wide and at least 4 ft. deep. Wow, can you imagine how much gold might have been trapped in there?? (Can you imagine how much they might have over-looked, not having metal detectors??

    Now, there’s a real “Kick in the Head”. I never even thought about that in later years when I was in that area WITH a metal detector. That’s one of the things that’s making this story tough. I keep thinking of things I should have done. (lol)
    Well, no biggy, I’m planning to head back up to the Merced right after the 1st of August. I’ll close out a few of these should ofs then. (lol) I’ll also bring back some picts to share with you. Maybe even some gold.

    OK, I’m finally down to the “crossing” to Pete’s cabin. And as luck would have it, Pete is on this side of the river, tying his boat up.

    I stopped and called down to him. (You know what? I never did hear anyone say what Pete’s last name was.) Anyway, I called down to him, “Mr Pete”, “Don sends his regards and says that if anybody knows anything about this river, that would be you”.

    He came up the path to my truck and asked, “You ain’t one of them newspaper fellers are you”? “No sir”, I replied, “I’m just a beginning prospector looking to find a little gold”. I got out of my truck, (hoping that it was safe to do so,) and opened my cooler. I could see his eyes open up when I pulled out that gallon jug of wine. I poured a cupful and offered it to him. “Well thankee, don’t mind iffen I do” he said.

    We had a little “chit-chat”, and he asked me if I wanted to go across the river to his cabin where we could sit and jaw a bit. I’ll tell you about our chat the next time. (lol)

  11. #26
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Well, I have a little “free” time and I guess you might like to know a little more about Hermit Pete. (Information gathered during our “Jawing” in the shade of his big old cedar tree.)

    I told him about my experiences at the North Fork, and about the tunnel being blown up. And at that, he slapped his knees, reared back and roared. “Yep, I remember those ol boys blowing up something up in Whiskey Gulch, but I never heered what it was”, he said between chuckles. “I’ve been wondering now for years what them tom fool idjits was up to”. “Leave it up to a railroad boy to use a dozen sticks of dynamite to do what 3 sticks would have done”.

    I was looking around at his set-up and found that he had fixed it really nice. First, there was the big cedar that we were enjoying the shade from. Then near the cedar, there was a rock lined pool, about 8 ft. across, with a pipe pouring water into it. I asked if I could drink some of the water and he said “hell yes, help yourself”.

    After I filled my cup from the water coming out of the pipe, he told me that he had piped the water down from a mountain spring, about a ¼ mile away. He said that that was one of the first things he did after he got his cabin built. Then, as an afterthought, he said that actually, the first thing he did was to plant that cedar tree. That was in 1901. (He must have been living a good life, as a quick mental calculation told me he must be around 80 to 83 years old. He didn’t look that old, and he sure didn’t move around like he was that old.) I guess that’s what happens when you don’t have a wife and kids to worry about. (lol)

    He said that it was about 6 ft. tall when he planted it. (At this time, it was perhaps 50 ft. tall) He also showed me 3 or 4 apple trees that were loaded with small apples and told me to come back around in November, when the apples are full grown, and I could have all that I could carry. That is, the ones the deer don’t pick. (lol)

    He also had several peach and a couple of other fruits, (that I don’t remember at the moment.) Plus some great looking grape vines behind the cabin. He said that they provided him with a couple a gallons of wine every year.

    I mentioned that I’d been told that he shot at the forestry men when they came around. “Naw, that’s BS, I ain’t never shot AT them and they knows it”. “I do pop a couple of rounds over their heads, just to let them know I ain’t interested in listen’n to them trying to talk me into moving outa here”. “Hell boy, I’ve been living here mosta my life”. “Where would I go from here”? “No siree bob”, I been here mosta my life, and this is where I wanta die”. “Guess they won’t bury me here though, might mess up their purty Gover’ment land”.

    We did a lot more “jawing”, but I’ll fill you in on some parts, as I remember them, but now, I want to get to dredging. And, he pointed out the same area that Don Brown told me about, but more explicitly, as we were within a short distance of it.

    He boated me back across the river, (after I insisted he keep the jug of wine, (or what was left of it.) (lol) I said my “see you later’s and drove down to an area where I could park and unload without blocking the roadway. It took almost an hour to unload and get the dredge ready for work, then after getting my wet suit on, I had to wade across the river, (chest deep) pulling the dredge behind me.

    I filled the gas tank to the engine and fired it up. In those days, the foot valve to the water pump was on the end of a flexible hose so that you had to “pump” the hose up and down until the water pump was “primed”.

    Sometimes, it wouldn’t catch a prime with the engine running, so, you’d have to shut the engine off, prime the pump, then fire it back up before the pump lost it’s prime again. (lol)

    Fortunately, my dredge was new, so I didn’t have this problem, at this time. So, after the engine was running smoothly, I put on my face mask, picked up my regulator, (I already had my weight belt on for traction while crossing the river.)
    I stuck the regulator in my mouth and slowly settled beneath the surface of the river.

    And then, things started to get very interesting.

    I’ll tell you about that when I return. (lol)

    Eagle

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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Holy cow I am addicted to this thread! This stuff is amazing and more to come it seems! Keep it coming!
    darthoblio likes this.
    Live each day as if it were your last.  Soak in and seek love and light and shine it upon everyone who will accept it.  Value your true friends like gold as they are more rare and valuable than you may ever know.  Live in integrity with all men.

  13. #28
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    Thank you RandyMan!! Yeah, that's what happens when you give an old man free rein to "run his mouth". What makes me even more dangerous is; I'm a "touch typist".

    I guess you could be considered lucky since I'm busy with other things!!

    Hey my friend, again, thanks for the encouragement!!!!!

    Eagle

  14. #29
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    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    The water is crystal clear and the feeling of weightlessness must be much like the astronauts feel once they are free of earths’ gravity………………. Until your knees bump lightly on the river bottom and stay there, rather than rebounding. (lol)

    Well, back to reality and my story!!

    “Hermit” Pete had told me that he knew “fer a fact” that this part of the river had never been dredged, or even worked by the “ol’ timers”. He said that when he built his cabin, there were only a couple of places, maybe about 2 miles up-river that had any type of mining operation going on, and the Mountain King, maybe a ½ mile down-river. Most of the mining was either hardrock mining, (like the Mountain King Mine,) or operations working the ancient alluvial channels up-river. Years later, I was exploring places up-river and found what had been a large operation, above McCabe Flats. I never did determine whether it was a hardrock or an alluvial operation. (Perhaps both?) Unfortunately, I had no interest in artifacts at the time, so I'm not sure, but, I believe it would still be a prime area for the dedicated artifact buff, even today. I'll tell you more about it in about 15 years. (lol)

    But right now, I have to get back to 1961 and see if I can get you excited about the area I was in then. (lol)

    Looking around under water, I realized that where I was, was very much like the spot I had dredged just below the mouth of the North Fork. The over-burden had been washed out a little more here, and the sixteen and eighteen inch boulders had the appearance of sitting on grassy topped pedestals that rose up a few inches out of the overburden. I picked up my suction nozzle and started working in the grass on the down-river side of the boulders, loosening and pulling out the grass. I know that sounds easy, but I’m here to tell you, the root structure of bunch grass is nothing to laugh about. That stuff is TOUGH!!

    It must have taken about an hour to work around 4 of the boulders, because, the next thing I knew, the dredge ran out of gas. By this time, I’m a bit disappointed as I had only seen a couple of small flakes go into the suction nozzle. So, I half heartedly stood up in about 4 ft. of water, wondering if I should move the dredge, or fill up and continue here until I found something. Decisions, decisions. And, I had thought that I was here to enjoy myself. (lol)

    I waded slowly back to the dredge, picking up the can of gas on the way, (you don’t wade fast in 4ft of water.) (lol) I sat the gas can on the float and leaned over to check out the header box, just in case. AND, “Holey Toledo Batman”. Where the heck did that come from??

    Remember the old song, “Happy Days Are Here Again”?? I’m not sure, but I might have been singing a little of it as I stood gazing in awe at what was laying in the header and right in front of the first riffle.

    Have you ever seen the rose colored “Black Hills” gold”? Well, this looked like it was straight out of the Dakotas. After much thought, I figured that the reason I didn’t see it while I was underwater was the color. There is an abundance of small gravel that has a bit of iron in it, giving it a kind of “rosy glow” and since I had no experience in gold of this color, I just wasn’t looking for it. Of course, today, I would like to think that I would find it impossible to miss more than two ounces of gold, regardless of the color. But, who knows? I surely haven’t seen everything yet, (just most everything.) (lol)

    I still have a couple of hours for dredging, but, I’ll tell you about that when I get back. (lol)

    Eagle

  15. #30
    us
    Dec 2007
    maui, hawaii
    321
    10 times

    Re: The Many Lost Treasures of Mariposa, CA

    as always, thank you for your wonderfull life stories. sure do think you should write a book because as i said to you before, when you are gone [ god willing you will be around for another 50 years ] there will be nobody to tell the real life stories and a big part of our history.
    take my friend talk to you soon. ron

 

 
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