Antique Corner Chair

SlagMaster

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Aug 14, 2016
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Picked up this cool chair from a garage sale. Looking for more info. Anything will help. What style of furniture is it? Age? Worth?
 

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Red-Coat

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Dec 23, 2019
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Cool indeed.

These are sometimes termed "Turner chairs" (also Turners and Turner's with or without a capital 'T'), but they take their name from earlier chairs of this type with bobbin-turned legs/struts. They were very popular in Victorian times, with many copied from a celebrated 17th Century example at Lord Leycester's Hospital in Warwick, England (also known as the "Saxon Chair"). Like this one:


Yours is in that tradition, obviously less ornate with respect to carving, not as old as Victorian and consequently rather less valuable. I would think it was artisanally produced sometime in the first half of the 1900s and has no more than a mid to low double-digit value.
 
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SlagMaster

Jr. Member
Aug 14, 2016
41
55
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
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Cool indeed.

These are sometimes termed "Turner chairs" (also Turners and Turner's with or without a capital 'T'), but they take their name from earlier chairs of this type with bobbin-turned legs/struts. They were very popular in Victorian times, with many copied from a celebrated 17th Century example at Lord Leycester's Hospital in Warwick, England (also known as the "Saxon Chair"). Like this one:


Yours is in that tradition, obviously less ornate with respect to carving, not as old as Victorian and consequently rather less valuable. I would think it was artisanally produced sometime in the first half of the 1900s and has no more than a mid to low double-dig

Cool indeed.

These are sometimes termed "Turner chairs" (also Turners and Turner's with or without a capital 'T'), but they take their name from earlier chairs of this type with bobbin-turned legs/struts. They were very popular in Victorian times, with many copied from a celebrated 17th Century example at Lord Leycester's Hospital in Warwick, England (also known as the "Saxon Chair"). Like this one:


Yours is in that tradition, obviously less ornate with respect to carving, not as old as Victorian and consequently rather less valuable. I would think it was artisanally produced sometime in the first half of the 1900s and has no more than a mid to low double-digit value.
Awesome Thanks!
 

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