Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 105
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #46

    Mar 2003
    330
    5 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    "Jesse James stopped robbing banks and shooting people 100 years ago, but the legends about him endure, especially in Missouri where he lived and died.

    They flourished there, thanks to the efforts of people like Rudy Turilli, who operates the Jesse James Museum in St. Louis. Turilli tells everyone who'll listen that the outlaw died of old age in 1951. But not everybody listens; plenty of sober citizens in Franklin County, Mo, prefer to believe that Bob Ford shot Jesse in the back of the head in 1882.

    The dispute was settled legally last month in Franklin County Circuit Court. Not only did a jury say Jesse was laid in his grave by that dirty little coward Ford, it also nicked Turilli $10,000 for telling people otherwise. Ironically, the award, all nice and legal, is to be paid to Mrs. Jesse James Jr. of Los Angeles, 85-year-old daughter-in-law of the outlaw.

    Turilli's museum is just off Route 66 where it heads southwest from St. Louis toward New Mexico and California. "Meramec Caverns, Jesse James Hideout," read blood-red billboards - the legend, alive and well in Missouri.

    Rudy Turilli came to Meramec Caverns in the mid-1940s, married the daughter of the cavern owner, Lester Dill, and took over the job of publicizing the tourist attraction. In 1948 Turilli's life changed forever. An old man woke up one morning out in Lawton, Okla. and announced that he was Jesse James. People at the local newspaper believed him, and the story was published: using the alias J.Frank Dalton. Jesse had been living in hiding until his 100th birthday ; he was coming forward now to live out his remaining years under the name he had made famous.

    Smelling a good thing, Turilli took up with the old man in St. Joseph, Mo. and persuaded him to visit Meramec Caverns. Dalton did and promptly recalled that this had been one of his favorite hideouts. Turilli and Dalton turned up some known members of the old gang, including two who came to the caverns, chatted with Dalton and proclaimed him to be the McCoy. Dalton provided detail after detail, apparently from memory, about the life and times of Jesse James, and he even showed body scars matching those Jesse was known to have had.

    The new Jesse revealed the truth about his death. He said the man that Bob Ford gunned down in the James home in St. Joseph on April 3, 1882 was a gang member named Charlie Bigelow and that the James family had told everyone the victim was Jesse. He, Jesse, had escaped to South America and returned a couple of years later to the Indian territory in Oklahoma.

    By now believing his own publicity, Turilli maintained Dalton at the Caverns for two years. In 1950 he took the old man to court in Franklin County to have his name legally changed (changed back, he said) to Jesse James. Wheeled into court on a stretcher, Dalton was in a cantankerous mood. "Cut out that damned picture taking," he snapped and waved spectators back with an old frontier-model six-shooter that he produced from beneath his blanket. He chewed his "eatin'" tobacco vigorously, from time to time spitting tobacco juice into an old tomato can. The judge was not impressed with the day-long testimony of the outlaw. He said that if Dalton had ever been Jesse James he still was and didn't need a change of name, and if he wasn't, he was trying to perpetrate a fraud on the court. He denied the petition.

    Sick and disillusioned, Dalton decided to leave Meramec Caverns in 1950 and went to Granbury, Texas where he died obscurely and alone in 1951 at the age of 103.

    Turilli has spent the last 22 years trying to convince people that Dalton was indeed Jesse James. In 1967, on the nationally televised Joe Pyne Show, Turilli said he would pay $10,000 to anyone who could prove otherwise. Jesse's daughter-in-law was watching the show in Los Angeles. She provided Turilli with family affidavits proving that the man killed by Ford in 1882 was the real Jesse. Turilli wouldn't accept her proof so she sued for the $10,000.

    The case finally reached court in Union, the seat of Franklin County, early last month. The 12 jurors, all plain-dressed, plain-spoken residents of communities in rural Franklin County, were not convinced by Turilli's evidence, which consisted mainly of the testimony of Jesse's former gang mates at the 1950 trial. They did believe an affidavit provided by Mrs. James which had been signed by Thomas Mimms in 1938. Mimms, a brother-in-law of Jesse James, swore that he had identified Jesse's body in an undertaker's parlor the day after the shooting. The jury also seemed to like the way Mrs. James's attorney characterized Turilli: "This man once went to New York City in a leopardskin suit to get publicity."

    The jury returned its verdict at dusk, in a quiet corner of a county long since past caring who shot Jesse. Bob Ford did, they said, and told Turilli to cough up the $10,000.

    Vehemently denying that he was a publicity hound, Turilli said he would, by God, appeal. Mrs. James could not travel all the way to Union for the trial, but her lawyer's final words to the jury summed up her feelings of the James family : "Dalton was probably a derelict all his life, and in his waning years he wanted to get a little publicity." Probably was."

    http://www.librarymail.org/genehist/...es_legend.html
    It's not what you look at but what you see

  2. #47
    us
    Jun 2009
    Oklahoma
    Bounty Hunter
    55

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    When J. Frank Dalton tried having his name changed to Jesse W. James, if I'm not mistaken, there was a letter sent by Jesse E. James stating that J. Frank Dalton was not his father. Now at this point in the game I would say that if the son of Jesse James said J.Frank Dalton is full of crap, then its a pretty safe bet he was full of crap and you cant really say that you know better than the mans son.

  3. #48
    Charter Member
    us
    MINELAB XS-2 Pro ....... XTERRA 305 ....... EXPLORER SE PRO

    Dec 2003
    S.W. Schuylkill County
    45,951
    5157 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Jay
    From:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bloodybillandersonmystery

    ***
    From: "The Truth About Jesse James" by Rudy Turilli, 1967.

    ***


    ~Texas Jay
    Hey Jay.

    Feel free to post any Info you Find.

    Jeff

  4. #49
    Charter Member
    us
    MINELAB XS-2 Pro ....... XTERRA 305 ....... EXPLORER SE PRO

    Dec 2003
    S.W. Schuylkill County
    45,951
    5157 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    multiple posts of the exact same thing are spam
    in most cases

  5. #50

    Mar 2003
    330
    5 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff of pa
    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Jay
    From:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bloodybillandersonmystery

    ***
    From: "The Truth About Jesse James" by Rudy Turilli, 1967.

    ***


    ~Texas Jay
    Hey Jay.

    Feel free to post any Info you Find.

    Jeff
    Yes Jay, please, post away. I'd love to see some of those "secret" documents your group has come up with to prove Dalton was JJ or that the KGC put any mega depositories in the ground.

    It's not what you look at but what you see

  6. #51
    us
    Feb 2006
    Brownwood, Texas
    Garrett Scorpion Gold Stinger, Garrett Ace 250
    547
    42 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Alec, why don't you tell the rest of the story about the $10,000? Isn't it a fact that Rudy Turilli never paid it and that Stella Bigelow (uh, I mean "James") never pursued it any farther? Wonder why that would be? Maybe it is because she didn't want the truth to come out about her father's and her real identities. If a jury awarded me $10,000 (especially in those days), I'd have hounded the defendant until he coughed it up.
    ~Texas Jay

  7. #52
    us
    Feb 2006
    Brownwood, Texas
    Garrett Scorpion Gold Stinger, Garrett Ace 250
    547
    42 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Well, Alec, unless I missed it your little article did not include the date the hearing was on but we do know that the Turilli book was published in 1967. Five years seems long enough to me to collect $10,000 from someone if one really wanted to.
    ~Texas Jay

  8. #53

    Mar 2003
    330
    5 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Jay
    Well, Alec, unless I missed it your little article did not include the date the hearing was on but we do know that the Turilli book was published in 1967. Five years seems long enough to me to collect $10,000 from someone if one really wanted to.
    ~Texas Jay
    Well, Jay, if you were paying attention to the details you would have noticed that was only part of the "little article" and I posted the web address for anyone that wanted to look for themselves and read the rest of the info. Apparently, like most of your information, you chose not to follow through with any real research, just seeing what you want to see.

    As for collecting any money, you can't collect what someone doesn't have. There are rules to collecting civil judgments and you just don't say "give me the money" and it happens. (research Jay, research) Death is a sure fire way of avoiding paying someone that you owe money to.
    It's not what you look at but what you see

  9. #54
    us
    Feb 2006
    Brownwood, Texas
    Garrett Scorpion Gold Stinger, Garrett Ace 250
    547
    42 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    If memory serves me correctly, Turilli had the amount of the reward secured with a certified check from Lester Dill, owner of Meramec Caverns in Stanton, Missouri.

    Here is a bit more from the Turilli book that may help clarify this:

    ***
    In the summer of 1950 I had visited Robert James, the son of Frank James, at Excelsior Springs, Missouri. At this time, I again had with me a reporter from the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Joe Wood. It had taken us two hours to locate Mr. Robert James. We had found him playing golf at a country club. We went to him and told him we had something important to tell him...

    "...Joe Wood had said to him, 'Mr. James, I have a
    certified check for $10,000 signed by Lester B. Dill of Stanton, Missouri, if
    you will come to Stanton and prove that J. Frank Dalton, whom we think is Jesse
    James, is a hoax. His answer to this was that he was not interested. I
    immediately stated that I would take J. Frank Dalton to Excelsior Springs. His
    answer to this was, 'If you bring him here, I will put a shot gun through him.'
    I have always wondered what Robert James was covering up. This I leave to the
    reader. I would also like to state that in my research around Kearney,
    Missouri, the homestead in which Jesse was born on September 5, 1847, was closed
    from the time that J. Frank Dalton revealed himself as Jesse W. James from 1948
    to 1951. WHY??..."

    ***
    Turilli makes it very clear that the $10,000 was offered as early as 1950 "to anyone who could prove that J.F. Dalton was not Jesse Woodson James". The offer was first made early in 1950 before the audience of NBC's "We the People" show. What took Stella so long to attempt to claim it?
    ~Texas Jay


  10. #55

    Mar 2003
    330
    5 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    How many people actually had TV's in the 50's Jay. You don't think it's possible that people have lives and don't sit in front of the boob tube 24 hours a day waiting for something that might concern them?

    Again, research Jay, research. No money was paid because the case was appealed. The judgment would have been put on hold until the appeal was settled. I will also say that just because somebody has money doesn't mean they will shell it out. Turilli proved that once already when Mrs. James proved her case to him and he refused to pay. That's why she had to take him to court in the first place because HE WOULDN'T PAY!
    It's not what you look at but what you see

  11. #56
    us
    Oct 2004
    South Central Oklahoma
    TF 900, Schonstedt, Whites, Garrett, GPR, etc.
    373
    28 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Jay take a look at my avatar those three men were in on promoting Dalton as Jesse their families confirmed it was a fraud. How much more proof do you need Hopefully we will power back on soon the ice storm knocked it out two days ago lucky i have my cell phone to check in on you guys
    http://okietreasurehunter.blogspot.com/

  12. #57
    Knights of the Golden Circle

    Jul 2009
    204
    30 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Hunters trail Jesse James’ gold near Cement
    BY KEN RAYMOND
    Published: December 13, 2009
    http://www.newsok.com/hunters-trail-...#ixzz0ZaRLrlQC

    CEMENT — The Keechi Hills spring out of the scrub like warts on a pretty girl’s face: unexpected but oddly compelling. The land near Cement isn’t flat; rounded rocky shoulders and sweeping potbellies bulge out of the earth, forming gradual slopes, but the Keechi knolls are something more. Dramatic and steep, they look out of place, random, as if God stored them here while designing a Western desert and forgot to pick them back up. Jumbled rock slabs and boulders perch on top, natural monuments to the dead outlaws and gangsters who frequented the area in days long past.


    Local legend says there were many such men, killers and thieves who came looking for a place to hole up and hide out. First among them, at least in terms of notoriety, is Jesse James. Even today, the outlaw’s name lingers on the lips of those who walk here, and most often, it is accompanied by another word, a better word, one that stirs dreams and greed and makes men smile. That word is treasure, and it’s why we’re here right now.
    "We” is James Dodson, Mark Pack and T.J. Johnson, plus me and photographer Chris Landsberger. After meeting up at Cement’s drugstore, we talked for a while at the Jesse James Visitor Center in town before driving out to the hills on rutted roads and dirt tracks.
    If anyone knows where the James gang’s treasure trail begins, it’s these guys, who have spent decades deciphering rock carvings and hunting down landmarks, trying to reconstruct the past. That alone doesn’t make them unique.
    "This whole town knows about treasure,” says Dodson, 38. "Everyone looks for it.”
    What does separate these men from the rest is this: They have treasure maps. Real ones. And not just any maps, but the ones that helped Joe Hunter, Oklahoma’s most dogged treasure seeker, unearth some of Jesse’s lost loot.
    $2 million in gold?
    When it comes to treasure, history is unreliable. Nobody hides ill-gotten gold where it can be found easily, and few who recover such riches — intentionally or fortuitously — broadcast their success. They want to keep it, so why involve insurance companies and property owners and government officials? Better to keep quiet.
    So it is that no one knows how much treasure is secreted away in caves or buried pots, and no one knows what’s myth and what’s real.
    Even so, there’s good reason to believe that southwest Oklahoma still holds reservoirs of outlaw loot. Hunter found the best evidence for that here, in the Keechi Hills, sometime in the 1930s.
    As Steve Wilson tells it in his book, "Oklahoma Treasures and Treasure Tales,” the James gang ambushed a Mexican pack-train in 1875 and stole $2 million in gold bars. They drove 18 heavily laden burros into the Wichita Mountains, where they were stalled by a blizzard. Knowing they could go no further, the gang hid the gold in a ravine. In March 1876, Jesse carved an outlaw contract into the side of a brass bucket, naming the conspirators and providing coded clues to the gold’s location, and hid it on Tarbone Mountain. Other clues were stashed elsewhere.
    Wilson contends the gang didn’t recover the gold. They tried to rob a Minnesota bank several months after hiding the bucket, but things went south, and the gang was splintered. A manhunt netted most gang members, and Jesse and his brother, Frank James, barely escaped. Five years later, Jesse was killed. Frank didn’t return to the Wichitas until 1907, when he built a house near Fletcher. Decades had passed since he’d helped hide the gold, and he couldn’t seem to find it.
    "Old-timers say that Frank James wore out six horses riding the trails, searching for landmarks to put him back on the road to the golden treasure,” Wilson wrote. "But the country had now been fenced and plowed. ... Towns had grown up overnight, and new roads were now traveled. The old trails were not called by the names the outlaws had known them.”
    Frank recovered some loot. How much isn’t known, but Wilson wrote that Frank may have unearthed as many as 14 caches before leaving Oklahoma in 1914. What’s clear is that he didn’t find everything.
    Enter Hunter. In 1932, Hunter, a peace officer, was approached by an old man near Rush Springs. The man spoke of treasure and gave Hunter three maps before drifting off, never to be seen again. "Hunter had no idea then,” Wilson wrote, "that the treasure maps would haunt him for the remainder of his days, causing him to abandon job and family alike.”
    The maps led Hunter across the Southwest looking for outlaw gold, but his most notable finds were in the Keechi Hills and the Wichitas. At Buzzard’s Roost, a knoll east of Cement, he dug up an iron pot. Inside were gold, jewels, a large pocket watch and a map carved into a copper sheet. Years later, he found the brass bucket Jesse had hidden at Tarbone Mountain. Nearby was a Dutch oven containing the chain and fob that matched the watch from Buzzard’s Roost.
    The gold? Hunter never found it.
    Pain and suffering on the treasure trail
    Halfway to the top of Buzzard’s Roost, my head explodes and my vision goes screwy. I hear someone uttering a steady stream of curse words, and somewhere along the line I realize, through a fog of pain, that it is me.
    Not long ago, I was standing at the base of the roost, staring upward with mild apprehension. The roost isn’t particularly tall, probably no more than 50 or 60 feet, but it’s steep. Can’t be too bad, I told myself. Johnson is 74 years old. If he can climb it, so can I.
    So I started up the trail, following in Jesse James’ footsteps. Dodson and Landsberger were well ahead of me. Johnson and Pack, 53, lagged a good distance behind. At a certain point, the hard-packed earth and weeds transformed into bare limestone. In places, the rock formed stairways, and in others, I had to hop or climb over obstacles. I’d nearly reached the top when my head erupted.
    At exactly the point where a sunny section of trail turned to shadow, a small fissure had opened up, bringing an attendant change in elevation. When I lunged from light to dark, I smashed my head into a stone overhang to my right. My sunglasses absorbed the brunt of the blow, leaving them hanging off one ear. My right temple took a wallop, too.
    Now, standing here checking for blood, it strikes me that treasure hunting is not without risk. Until this moment, it seemed a mental exercise, a dreamer’s game, a fantasy fueled by legend and fed by pop culture. Pack complained an hour or so ago that people lump treasure hunters into the same category as Bigfoot enthusiasts and alien abductees, and he’s right. So much of it is shrouded in secrecy and faith, and ideologies differ. The "truth” about Jesse James is a perfect example. In films and novels, the Missouri outlaw has morphed from a selfish sociopath who killed for his own benefit into a dashing Robin Hood figure whose thieving ventures somehow benefited the poor. A recent documentary on The History Channel cast him as a political animal, robbing to fund the Confederacy as a member of a secret society, the Knights of the Golden Circle, which hoped to annex Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America.
    "It’s a theory,” Dodson told me earlier. "Not a good one, in my opinion, but some people seem to have fun with it.”
    I catch up with Landsberger and Dodson, a broad-shouldered outdoorsman who hosts annual conferences on treasure hunting. He’s sun-burnished and squinty-eyed, a pressure cooker of secrets. He doesn’t trust me with them, but when the stress of staying silent proves too much, hints hiss out of him like steam. He doesn’t agree that the gang never returned for the gold. "I’m fairly sure they came back and retrieved it and probably reburied it in smaller caches,” he says. Why is he so sure? He won’t say, not outright. Instead of edification, he offers speculation.
    He is similarly unforthcoming about his success as a treasure hunter. The only things I know he has found are flintlock pistol parts and piled, carved or drilled stones. Johnson has collected a bag of coins over the years, and Pack, who chooses his words carefully, says: "A lot of the treasure to me is the friendships I’ve formed and just the hiking and being out in nature.” If not for the maps, there’d be little to differentiate them from other history buffs.
    But they do have the maps. And the watch.
    Mystery binds friends and families
    If you’ve never seen a treasure map before — if you’ve never held one in your hands — you cannot imagine how compelling they are. Maps have always been a source of fascination; most men, at least those without GPS navigators, have an assortment of them scattered around their cars, and you can’t browse the home decor section of any department store without seeing at least one framed map. They call to us: These are the places I’ve been. These are the places I want to go. I wonder what life is like somewhere else.
    A treasure map, though, is like nothing produced by Rand McNally. The images are meant to convey information only to a select few, and there’s no printed legend to explain the scale or the meaning of cryptic symbols. Faded and torn, they demand close scrutiny, and the longer you stare, the more you feel bound up in mystery. Knowledge hovers just beyond the edges of the map. You’re so close, but you’re not quite there.
    Ray Pack, 77, knows that feeling better than most. In 1971, when he was a pharmacist in Ada, he read an article about Joe Hunter and the James gang’s hidden gold. His mind flashed to one of his customers, Kenneth Hunter. As it turned out, Kenneth was Joe’s son, and he still had the Buzzard’s Roost watch and an assortment of his father’s old maps. He agreed to sell to Pack.
    "It wasn’t a bad price,” Pack said. "He only charged me $300 for 13 maps ... and the watch.”
    For 38 years, Pack has studied the maps and Oklahoma’s Indian Territory past. His Marlow home looks like a museum — one room dedicated to military artifacts, another to outlaw treasure. An enlarged copy of a map hangs on the wall, and the oversized pocket watch is displayed with a photograph of Jesse James in a small wood-and-glass case. The other maps are stored in a photo album. One, drawn on a ragged linen square, is as fragile as a cobweb.
    This whole business, treasure hunting, seems nearly as delicate. How many clues have been lost to time? How many secrets followed their owners to the grave? Pack, who has emphysema, no longer goes out in the field. He has passed his information to his son, Mark Pack, and grandson. Dodson, who learned about treasure from his father and Wilson, is teaching his sons, ages 10 and 15, to search.
    "I know more about Oklahoma history than you could probably ever learn in school,” Dodson said.
    "That’s why I’ve got my boys interested in the same thing. They can tell their teachers about things they’ve never heard of before.”
    By all indications, these guys — the Packs, Dodson, Johnson — haven’t struck it big. They’re Wrangler jeans and T-shirt guys with rough hands and work boots. If they’re sitting on a pile of outlaw gold, they’re good at keeping it low-key. But seeing them together, sitting around Ray Pack’s coffee table discussing "The Chronicles of Oklahoma” and looking at surveyors’ charts, it’s clear they’ve found something — even if, as Mark Pack said earlier, it’s simply each other. In their own way, they’re like Jesse’s watch in the other room, which stopped ticking more than a century ago but grows more valuable each day. In this Internet age, when information is mere seconds away, they cling to books and maps and conversation, patiently searching for answers they may never find. And maybe that’s it — that’s all they need — the search, nothing more. Maybe that’s answer enough.
    No point in getting discouraged
    I’m hanging out with Dodson at the bottom of Buzzard’s Roost. Landsberger has wandered off somewhere, and Johnson and Mark Pack are still near the top of the knoll, hoping he’ll come back and snap a photo of them. They look as if they’re waiting for a bus.
    Earlier, I asked Pack and Dodson if they ever get discouraged.
    "Just because you’re in the right area and everything, that don’t mean the money is still there,” Pack told me. "It could have been dug up 20, 30 years after it was put down.”
    "Sometimes you come upon an empty hole,” Dodson added. "That’s kind of disappointing, but it’s good to know you followed the signs right.”
    I’m reminded of that when Johnson and Pack finally descend. "What took you so long?” Dodson asks.
    "We stopped for awhile at the top of the trail,” Johnson says. "We thought that photographer was going to take our picture.”
    Right place, wrong time. Another empty hole.

    Read more: http://www.newsok.com/hunters-trail-...#ixzz0f4AgSD0p
    Knights of the Golden Circle Archive and Research
    Sons of Liberty and the Order of American Knights

  13. #58
    us
    Jun 2009
    Oklahoma
    Bounty Hunter
    55

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    cccalco I really dont know where you were going with posting this clip from the daily oklaohoma but I do enjoy reading it. For you see James Dodson is one man who I would consider a mentor when it comes to treasure hunting and me. Even though we are close in age he has taught me alot and helped me tons. Every time I have a question he has the answer or at least advice. He puts on a yearly treasure hunting meeting that is funded out of his own pocket. There are door prizes and tons of information there. James makes sure that everyone walks away with a little something and he ask for nothing in return. He takes time to talk with each and every person at the meeting and when he speaks to the crowd as a whole he knows each and every persons name there. He is for sure a man to float the river with.

  14. #59
    us
    Oct 2004
    South Central Oklahoma
    TF 900, Schonstedt, Whites, Garrett, GPR, etc.
    373
    28 times

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    BBJ, thanks for the compliment. Ron (Alec) has been good at offering advice and ideas as well. I'm proud to have him writing for the blog. He does this on his own time without compensation. We just like helping folks out.


    http://okietreasurehunter.blogspot.com/
    http://okietreasurehunter.blogspot.com/

  15. #60
    us
    Jun 2009
    Oklahoma
    Bounty Hunter
    55

    Re: History Channel Story On Jesse James, KGC, And Found Coins

    Okie I agree, Ron has always post well thought out, and entertaining articles on your blog website as well as always been a huge help with info and questions that I may have.Plus he is a hoot to talk to through email. He wasn't mentioned in the article written in the "Daily Oklahoman" and that was the only reason I hadn't mentioned him. I know that he was out of pocket at the time of the article or I'm sure that his "sun-burnished and squinty-eyed" would have add lots to the story (note to everyone this is where Ron laughs and James shakes his head LOL). If I remember correctly Ron received a golden detector award at the last meeting and I would say that all the time he spends posting, helping others ,and from what I gather from James, being a dang good hunting partner, that it was a well deserved award. As a matter of fact I cant wait for the next meeting and highly suggest anyone that can make it and wants to have a good time needs to show up and meet both of these guys as well as a whole slew of interesting and great people. It sure as heck beats sitting at home and watching some history channel show.

 

 
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsors

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

jesse james and underwood
,
jesse james coins found
,

jesse james gold

,
jesse james gold coins found
,

jesse james gold found

,
jesse james iii gold
,
jesse james kgc history channel
,
jesse james treasure found history channel
,
pastore jesse james treasure
,
the history channel the kgc jesse james
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.1.3