Treasure Mountain, CO - Lost Frenchmens Gold - Page 3
Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 3 of 35 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 512
Like Tree1442Likes

Thread: Treasure Mountain, CO - Lost Frenchmens Gold

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #31

    Feb 2015
    Victor, CO...City of Mines
    Minelab EQ800, Ex2
    1,455
    2690 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I loved this story when I lived in Alamosa. I took a few hikes towards music pass. Its incredibly wild and remote. There is a wonderful ghost town on the north side of the sand dunes. On the west side there is a spring north of Del Norte. Its a good spot for plume agate. It has remains of very old foundation nearby. That Valley is a treasure with the Spanish trail on each side. I heard the author speak in Saguache mostly what I got is that his family was looking for it more north of Del Norte. This turned me away from it because the books say the gold was stashed on the East side. If the story is a hoax it sure was a fun one for me to dream about. I haven't jumped in that spring but this thread starts me thinking about it again
    sdcfia, Beans, mdog and 1 others like this.

  2. #32

    Feb 2008
    2,873
    629 times
    Isn't there an ancient trail just east of Del Norte crossing the present highway? Years ago I was
    told it was a Spanish route to California. Anyway I always looked for it going toward Southfork
    and bye gum I thought I could see it.
    Beans and mdog like this.

  3. #33
    us
    May 2008
    Oklahoma
    Ace 250
    1,476
    942 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Honorable Mentions (1)
    Quote Originally Posted by Beans View Post
    Interesting thread. I lived in Del Norte and South Fork early 60s as a Kid. Sure wish I could pass on some info to you guys. Last visit was last year, just passed thru. Tried to find were my Gparents lived but it must have been torn down. I just received a book called "Mt. Lookout" "Where you can see for two days..." by Ruth Marie Colville. History of Del Norte. Did a quick scan for any mention of Treasure Mt. did not find any thing. Copyright is 1995. I will read it and let you all know if there is any mention of any treasure.
    Finished the book. Very detailed account of Del Norte. No mention of lost gold or of the names mentioned in this thread. Although there seemed to had been a lot of gold and silver in and around the area.
    mdog likes this.

  4. #34
    us
    Mar 2011
    1,894
    3974 times
    Here's a map that shows Spanish territory in the west about 1807. Click on the map and you can zoom in or out. It shows
    a corrected route of the Pike Expedition. It shows Pikes Fort and where he was arrested by the Spanish. Pike's fort is about
    55 miles ESE of Treasure Mountain.

    https://www.loc.gov/item/99446138

    Here's a modern map that shows Pike's expedition and how his route compares with the tracks of the Villemont and Lebreau expeditions, as described by Maynard Adams.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pike 3 800.jpg 
Views:	489 
Size:	191.6 KB 
ID:	1286292
    sdcfia and Benjamin Gates like this.

  5. #35
    us
    Mar 2011
    1,894
    3974 times
    Villemont came in from the north along the South Platte River and went south to Santa Fe. Lebreau came in from
    the south and the survivors of the massacre followed the Arkansas River to the east.

    Just a note, I've spent a lot of time looking for evidence of the Villemont expedition and I still haven't had any luck.
    I believe my research skills are too elementary to dig as deep as what is required. I'll keep plugging away and post
    anything I find.
    sdcfia likes this.

  6. #36

    Feb 2008
    2,873
    629 times
    mdog, you may want to check out "Great River" by Paul Horgan for Zebulon Pikes encounter with the
    Spanish regime at Santa Fe. There was a white man there but he was a Kentuckian, not a Frenchman.
    mdog likes this.

  7. #37
    us
    Mar 2011
    1,894
    3974 times
    Quote Originally Posted by lastleg View Post
    mdog, you may want to check out "Great River" by Paul Horgan for Zebulon Pikes encounter with the
    Spanish regime at Santa Fe. There was a white man there but he was a Kentuckian, not a Frenchman.
    Thanks, Lastleg. ECS has a post in my KGC thread that mentions James Purcell, a guy that Pike met in Santa Fe. Purcell was supposed to have found gold somewhere close to Fairplay, Colorado.
    sdcfia, ECS and Benjamin Gates like this.

  8. #38
    us
    Mar 2011
    1,894
    3974 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
    This is also known as the LeBlanc Treasure, Treasure of Citadel Mountain, and who knows what else, lol. A 'deposit' was identified while France owned that part of Colorado. Then, after some of that 'Treaty Stuff', Spain ended up owning it. Plenty of French Patriotism left over, as well as thoughts about the 'deposit'. A party of Frenchmen came in (from Quebec and St. Louis) to 'mine' the 'deposit', secretly. Then, the usual Treasure Tale stuff of running from Indians, etc. This also gets tied up with the Treasure of Round Mountain (there is also a Round Hill to the east, in the SLV, that might have gotten confused in.

    Two books written on it by Maynard Cornett Adams are, Citadel Mountain and Citadel Mountain II (1844-1848). There was supposed to be a third published (but I don't know if it ever did), titled, Citadel Mountain III (1885-1920's).

    Christopher O'Brien, whom you are quoting, claims that he was approached by a guy he calls Tito Ortiz, who married into the LeBlanc Family, and who's father-in-law had a Map, to see if he could 'lift the curse' on the Treasure. I highly doubt CO'B is capable of any such thing. That's this Christopher's sorta thang, lol.

    EDIT: looks like Maynard was brought up already. Didn't read whole thread, lol.
    Hi, Nobody. When you mention a deposit, are you talking about ore that hasn't been mined or gold that has been mined and hidden? Thanks for posting and good to hear from you.

  9. #39
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,658
    6952 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
    You make assumptions here, sdcfia. Why? Why do you assume that the French were exploiting placers or a lode deposit? Maybe they were exploiting a cache that was previously mined. Those Frenchmen would have passed through some damn easy pickens placer gold, to get to that 'placer or deposit'. You think NM is the only place with Old Stuff? Lol.
    Why? I always had the Treasure Mountain tale pegged as some sort of a coded message relating to other unnamed things in Southern Colorado. When mdog presented plausible events attached to historical people - stuff that I was too lazy to find for myself - I looked at the possibility that this story might actually be a possibility. Playing it straight, I have to admit that the timing and plot line are feasible, if not exaggerated. Knowing whether Villemont was a straight-up explorer or a guy who had prior information to follow up on would be telling, but that source data is missing. LeBreau spent five years following Villamont. His guys could have racked up a lot of gold from unworked placer streams in five years. Or, from another perspective, he could also have spent his time splitting up one Big Cahuna that Villamont found into several smaller Cahunas. That's the "old cache" approach. Verdict: undecided.

    That said, this tale is quite similar in many aspects to at least one other "five-year gold harvest" legend that I'm very familiar with in New Mexico. We can draw our own conclusions about these things, but no matter what side you come down on, all we have to work with is circumstantial evidence - lots of it too - to support our views, no matter what they are. I know we live in a fractal world, but too many plot line coincidences eventually set off alarms with me. I will say this: the SLV environs has been an A-list destination beginning in the 16th century for some heavy hitting Spaniards, Frenchies, Americans and European Crypto-Jew refugees, and probably not for the hospitable venue. Before that? We don't know. Throw in the UFO/Treasure thingy and you've got a great place to run wild in.

    You mentioned Fremont. He's a person of interest whose history is well-known. From a personal perspective, he's a troubling link for me. He ordered Kit Carson to murder two of my long-time searching partner's blood line in Yerba Buena (San Francisco) in the 1840s. Their name was De Haro. A hundred and thirty years later, a man named Hare sent my partner to Santa Rita, NM looking for treasure, just a couple miles from where Carson wintered in the 1820s. I hate coincidences.
    mdog and Ryano like this.
    "Well, yeah, that's just, like, your opinion, man."
    Jeffrey "The Dude" Lebowski, 1998

  10. #40
    us
    Mar 2011
    1,894
    3974 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
    Concerning that time frame and general area (northern SLV), don't forget about the Spanish Cave of Gold on Marble Mountain, released to the public in the 30's in an article by Alberta Pike. Whomever released the Marble Mountain story had to have some idea about the Treasure Mountain stuff.



    Napolean is an interesting one, to be sure. One of those Dudes who thought he was riding a Rising Star - found out differently at Waterloo. Of course, Napolean is tied into all of the Secret Society stuff, as well as the Jesuits:

    ]He [Napolean] takes care to state the legitimacy of his position in constitutional and theological terms: ‘Called by the divine providence and by the Constitution of the Republic to the imperial power...’ Two months after this letter was written, Napoleon was proclaimed Emperor by the Senate, and on 2 December 1804, his coronation took place at Notre Dame Cathedral in the presence of Pope Pius VII.

    Unfortunately, the relationship soon began to sour, initially over the French incursion on Papal territory in 1805, and with Napoleon gradually appropriating further Papal lands over the next two years. Finally, in June 1809, Napoleon was excommunicated. In retaliation, Pius was kidnapped and exiled until May 24, 1814, when Allied forces freed the Pope during a pursuit of Napoleonic forces which led to Napoleon's first exile to Elba..

    Shortly after his release, with the political climate of Europe much more stable, Pope Pius VII issued an order restoring the Society of Jesus in the Catholic countries of Europe, including France.


    I remember you posting a quip about a French Expedition traveling up the Ark, looking for a Green Stone. They didn't find it, but I did, lol ...
    Yes, that was the la Harpe expedition. I'm interested in the story about the green stone you found on the Arkansas. What did you find?
    sdcfia likes this.

  11. #41
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,658
    6952 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Quote Originally Posted by mdog View Post
    Yes, that was the la Harpe expedition. I'm interested in the story about the green stone you found on the Arkansas. What did you find?
    I would like to hear this too. Was this a landmark in the form of a green stone, a green stone with carvings on it, a deposit of valuable green mineral, etc? It reminds me of the 1530s Cabeza de Vaca report, wherein he describes meeting natives who had (presumably) emerald arrowheads. This report helped fuel the "Seven Cities" mania and set off Marcos de Niza into the Southwest, and later, Coronado.
    lastleg and mdog like this.
    "Well, yeah, that's just, like, your opinion, man."
    Jeffrey "The Dude" Lebowski, 1998

  12. #42

    Feb 2008
    2,873
    629 times
    There is one thing we can all agree upon: Tito Ortiz is a real human being.
    mdog likes this.

  13. #43
    us
    Mar 2011
    1,894
    3974 times
    Here are some small clips about Villemont.

    MSS 350 EVALUATION OF LUIS VILEMONT REPORT, 1799 MAY 19.
    1 ITEM.

    Luis Vilemont served the French and then the Spanish government in colonial
    Louisiana. A naturalist, he made trips to VA, PA, Upper LA, Canada, and NM
    for the Spanish crown. Vilemont sent three reports to the secretary of the Indies
    outlining his suggestions on finances, Indians, and immigration to LA. Fran-
    cisco Requena and Bernardo Yriarte were Spanish officials assigned to evaluate
    Vilemont's reports. They concurred with Vilemont that Indians on the colony's
    borders should be weaned from dependence on the United States and discour-
    aged from engaging in commerce with British subjects. They urged Spain to
    protect the otter-skin industry and to use LA as a buffer against Anglo-Ameri-
    can ambitions in Mexico. Vilemont's suggestions were not acted upon by the
    Spanish. Spanish.

    MSS 351 LETTER FROM FRANCISCO REQUENA TO MIGUEL
    CAYETANO SOLER, 1799 MAY 19. 1 ITEM.

    Miguel Cayetano Soler was treasurer of Spain during the late eighteenth cen-
    tury. Requena's letter expresses the concern of Spanish officials about the en-
    croachment of Anglo-Americans in LA and the interest of the American govern-
    ment in the territory. Spanish.

    On this link, scroll down to items 185 and 186. It seems the Spanish King had confidence in Villemont's opinions.

    http://www.dsloan.com/catalogues/pdf/Bulletin04.pdf


    This article is from the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Napoleon is acknowledging the value of Louisiana after he decided to sell.

    Add again that the value of Louisiana was much better understood
    than it had been before. " I know the worth of what I give up," said
    Bonaparte ; and the French Government knew it indeed. They acted
    with open eyes, for they had taken care from the year 1800 to gather
    all available information. One of the memoirs with which they en-
    lightened themselves had been asked of Louis Vilemont, former cap-
    tain in the regiment of Louisiana. It is still unpublished; and it



    52 LOUISIANA PUECHASE EXPOSITION.

    informed the Government that " from various reports of Canadian
    and Indian hunters it is possible to walk from Missouri to the sea in
    less than two months and a half."

    Here's the link. https://archive.org/stream/finalrepo...0unit_djvu.txt

    Mdog here. It seems that Villemont had the confidence of two powerful rulers but there is still no mention of an expedition that he led. We know from Trudeau's letter that Villemont was in St. Louis but there were many explorers that he could have pressed for information.

    Louis de Villemont was the brother of Don Carlos de Villemont who was the commandant of Arkansas Post from 1794-1802.


    Beans and sdcfia like this.

  14. #44
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,658
    6952 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
    Do you really think there was anything such as a 'straight-up' explorer guy? Especially with the French and Spanish, let alone the US explorers. "Hey, Brother Pike/Villamont, while yer out there lookin' around, don't forget to ..." Kind of starts to get back to some of Cort's work, plus I subscribe to the theory that has Templars, and others, over here pre-1492. I know you at least consider the possibility of FRENCH Templars being here pre-1492. You also subscribe to the theory of, 'the original owners never forgot that they have this stuff, or where they put it', so, for me, it almost takes extraordinary evidence to support the extraordinary claim that he was fully on the up and up, and was just some 'innocent' French explorer who luckily stumbled upon gold. Kind of like with all of those Treasure Legends released in the 30's - the FIRST thing you do is work from the assumption it is BS, until it proves itself otherwise.
    That's why I admire Cort's work - he presents the kind of evidence that can be verified by anyone who is able to draw a straight line. The implications of this evidence may remain speculative, but the associations are clearly established. That raises the bar for his arguments. The difference between you and me is not so much the plot line, but the level of commitment to it. To me, the conspiracies are my current working model - my most logical explanation of the phenomenon - and always subject to refinement with additional evidence. You are more rigid about things, like a proselytizer. I don't want to be a true believer based on faith alone. I just want the truth, not matter what it is. If my model needs tweaking, then I move on.

    'We'? You gotta mouse in yer pocket? I have a real damn good idea what was going on. Real good.
    Yeah, me too, but I can't prove it yet. I may support a number of your ideas, but that doesn't prove them.

    Chapter 2 deals with what Restall calls "the Myth of the King's Army" – the belief that the Spanish conquest was undertaken at the behest of the King of Spain and that the conquistadors were Spanish soldiers. Restall claims that in fact the conquistadors did not necessarily see themselves as Spanish but rather identified as Andalusians, Castilians, Aragonese, Basque, Portuguese, Galician, and even Genoese, Flemish, Greek and Pardo (half-black). Nor were they acting under the command of the Holy Roman Emperor who was also the king of the Spanish realms. And they were not soldiers in a formal military sense of the word but rather a group of feudal lords with their respective footmen, servants, pages and mercenaries.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_...anish_Conquest

    And, don't forget what was going on in Spain in 1492 - the expulsion of Jews:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alhambra_Decree
    Spain still maintains regional autonomy, vigorous in places like Barcelona (Catalan) and Granada (Andalusia). Most of the early Conquerors were rich dudes who financed their own expeditions and brought their own private armies. The King wanted them to play nice, but we know how that went. The Church guys who went along were on a heretic killing frenzy and didn't have the time or gumption to slow down the looting and destruction. The question to consider is whether the Conquerors had known targets ahead of time or just lucked into all that gold. To me, the Coronado/Marcos de Niza story is the most fascinating.

    As far as the SLV, well, that Christopher O'Brien dude has written a couple books about it. He is also the Dead Cow Guy. He has a book out called Stalking the Herd, which is about cattle mutilations, the first which made the public headlines was in the SLV in the 60's and was actually a horse, not a cow. I don't like his Tito Ortiz story, though. Sumpin' doesn't smell right about it. O'Brien tried to pump me for some treasure info on a forum he is on, recently. He was either pulling the journalistic crap of asking a broad question, and seeing what I would say, or he realized he opened a can of worms with me, lol, and went quiet. He also has a story in one of those books of someone being taken for a ride in a UFO, and shown a treasure site. Kinda like Rog. Except them boys never left the ground ...
    Well, O'Brien's job is to make money by selling stuff the public wants. People like the SLV woo-woo, so he does all right I guess.

    Well, sdcfia, you'd hate me, then, lol. For you wouldn't want to believe what all of those coincidences tell you about me, so you'd accept them as only such, despite the overwhelming number of them - I guess you'd really hate me for the sheer number of them, lol.
    Well, I probably misspoke. I should have said that I love coincidences because when they pile up, I sense a weakness in the presentation that they're attached to. Then we can begin to look under the hood.
    mdog likes this.
    "Well, yeah, that's just, like, your opinion, man."
    Jeffrey "The Dude" Lebowski, 1998

  15. #45

    Feb 2008
    2,873
    629 times
    Has anyone been to the memorial or likeness of Tito Ortiz at Huntington Beach? Shamrock always
    goes on St Paddy's Day.

 

 
Page 3 of 35 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Skeleton Mountain Lost Treasure
    By kple2208 in forum Treasure Legends - Oregon
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Mar 21, 2014, 03:21 PM
  2. Lost Slate Mountain Gold
    By KGCnewbieseeker in forum Treasure Leads
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Dec 24, 2013, 12:46 PM
  3. Lost Lebreau gold bullion, Treasure Mountain Colorado
    By Deadman's Bullion in forum Treasure Legends - Colorado
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Dec 09, 2008, 07:17 PM
  4. Lost Frenchmen Mine
    By puna in forum Oregon
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Jan 05, 2008, 11:37 AM
  5. Georgia Lost Mountain Treasure
    By Mikeie in forum Cache Hunting
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jan 15, 2005, 07:08 AM

Search tags for this page

?????2017 m.kan300.com
,

colorado twin sisters mountain\ treasure stories

,
french treasure mountain
,

large kgc treasure in colarado

,
le blanc treasure map
,
leblancs tressure map colarado
,
lost leblanc treasure co
,

treasure mountain colorado

,
what diseases did the french treasure mountain hunters have
,
where is treasure mountain
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0