Did some digging today.

Hbot37

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ArfieBoy

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Aug 11, 2011
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Great bunch of bottles! Thanks for posting and congratulations! Thanks for sharing.
 

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Hbot37

Hbot37

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Nice finds! You never really get tired of finding Milk of Magnesia bottles, have yet to find my first corker though...
Your comment made me realize the other ones Ive dug were definitely screw tops, and a darker blue. So I did some research and found this paper that dates my variety here to 1906-1915. I thought that was pretty cool.

 

pepperj

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Managed to get out today and scored a couple keepers out of my dump site. Nothing too crazy but I’m a fan of them. Also got a couple glass stoppers and marbles which are cool. Thanks for looking!
Congrats on the glass, and certainly a few very nice keepers.
Here is a little write up on the medicine bottle you like.

The History of Knoxville Rests Here: Charles Clark Lotspeich was born to Valentine Servier and Mary Mitchell Lotspeich in Greenville, TN, on Sept. 5, 1871. The Lotspeichs were some of the earliest settlers in Greene County. His grandfather on his mother's side spent his life as the local undertaker and cabinet maker. Early on, Charles' father followed the family tradition of farming but eventually entered the mercantile profession. Charles and Mary, along with their two sons, resettled in Knoxville while the boys were young. Charles' brother, John Mitchell Lotspeich, was three years his senior.
Both the Lotspeich brothers studied to be druggists, and in the late 1890s, they formed the Lotspeich Brothers, proprietors of "Sure Cure" Remedies. In 1899, John partnered with William Greever, an experienced salesman, to begin to produce Blue Ribbon Extracts as well. Over time, the firm moved away from producing "Sure Cure" Remedies as the Blue Ribbon flavoring extract business prospered and grew, becoming one of the largest extract providers in the southeastern United States. Eventually, Charles, not wanting to leave the profession, bought out a pharmacy located on the southeastern corner of Magnolia Avenue and Central Street. Opening in 1895, the pharmacy appears to have been a customer of the former "Sure Cure" Remedies. Dr. Lotspeich renamed it Lotspeich Pharmacy.
Over the next 21 years, Lotspeich Pharmacy would become one of the most successful in Knoxville due to a number of innovative approaches. For example, they added four phone lines, offered 24-hour service, and served families with free home delivery. Dr. Lotspeich became very involved in a number of community organizations, including the Kiwanis, and had a sports award named for him at the old Knoxville High School.
In 1925, he contracted with architect R.F. Graf to build a lovely new home at 1601 Magnolia Ave. As the business grew, he eventually moved the pharmacy across the street to a larger location, located on the southwestern corner.
But Dr. Lotspeich's world was rocked in the spring of 1927 when he was charged in federal court for violating the national prohibition law. While denying that he was a bootlegger, he eventually pleaded guilty to allowing Clarence Drummond, a member of the infamous Jack McGill liquor ring, to store their liquor in his warehouse. As a result, he was sentenced to serve 90 days in the county jail, but the sentence was later reduced to 60 days.
Oddly, the arrest did not seem to damage his reputation to a great extent, and both he and his wife continued to serve in the leadership of several organizations. Even while he was serving his sentence, the News-Sentinel ran an article complimenting how helpful he had been while in jail, giving first aid to prisoners and aiding the county physician with injuries too light to necessitate a trip to General Hospital. About a year after the ordeal, Lotspeich sold his business to W.C. Sharp, who already owned two other drug stores on North Broadway, and he retired.
Just days later, his brother passed away after a brief illness. His wife, very popular in social circles, passed away on Jan. 30, 1941, at the age of 67 and was buried in the lovely Greenwood Cemetery. Dr. Lotspeich would follow her on Oct. 10, 1944.
 

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Hbot37

Hbot37

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Congrats on the glass, and certainly a few very nice keepers.
Here is a little write up on the medicine bottle you like.

The History of Knoxville Rests Here: Charles Clark Lotspeich was born to Valentine Servier and Mary Mitchell Lotspeich in Greenville, TN, on Sept. 5, 1871. The Lotspeichs were some of the earliest settlers in Greene County. His grandfather on his mother's side spent his life as the local undertaker and cabinet maker. Early on, Charles' father followed the family tradition of farming but eventually entered the mercantile profession. Charles and Mary, along with their two sons, resettled in Knoxville while the boys were young. Charles' brother, John Mitchell Lotspeich, was three years his senior.
Both the Lotspeich brothers studied to be druggists, and in the late 1890s, they formed the Lotspeich Brothers, proprietors of "Sure Cure" Remedies. In 1899, John partnered with William Greever, an experienced salesman, to begin to produce Blue Ribbon Extracts as well. Over time, the firm moved away from producing "Sure Cure" Remedies as the Blue Ribbon flavoring extract business prospered and grew, becoming one of the largest extract providers in the southeastern United States. Eventually, Charles, not wanting to leave the profession, bought out a pharmacy located on the southeastern corner of Magnolia Avenue and Central Street. Opening in 1895, the pharmacy appears to have been a customer of the former "Sure Cure" Remedies. Dr. Lotspeich renamed it Lotspeich Pharmacy.
Over the next 21 years, Lotspeich Pharmacy would become one of the most successful in Knoxville due to a number of innovative approaches. For example, they added four phone lines, offered 24-hour service, and served families with free home delivery. Dr. Lotspeich became very involved in a number of community organizations, including the Kiwanis, and had a sports award named for him at the old Knoxville High School.
In 1925, he contracted with architect R.F. Graf to build a lovely new home at 1601 Magnolia Ave. As the business grew, he eventually moved the pharmacy across the street to a larger location, located on the southwestern corner.
But Dr. Lotspeich's world was rocked in the spring of 1927 when he was charged in federal court for violating the national prohibition law. While denying that he was a bootlegger, he eventually pleaded guilty to allowing Clarence Drummond, a member of the infamous Jack McGill liquor ring, to store their liquor in his warehouse. As a result, he was sentenced to serve 90 days in the county jail, but the sentence was later reduced to 60 days.
Oddly, the arrest did not seem to damage his reputation to a great extent, and both he and his wife continued to serve in the leadership of several organizations. Even while he was serving his sentence, the News-Sentinel ran an article complimenting how helpful he had been while in jail, giving first aid to prisoners and aiding the county physician with injuries too light to necessitate a trip to General Hospital. About a year after the ordeal, Lotspeich sold his business to W.C. Sharp, who already owned two other drug stores on North Broadway, and he retired.
Just days later, his brother passed away after a brief illness. His wife, very popular in social circles, passed away on Jan. 30, 1941, at the age of 67 and was buried in the lovely Greenwood Cemetery. Dr. Lotspeich would follow her on Oct. 10, 1944.
Thanks for the write up, I had been having trouble finding exactly what it would have been. By the sound of it, it was likely some kind of extract.
 

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Hbot37

Hbot37

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Got some cleaned up pictures and a video of this dig for y'all. Let me know what you think, thanks!

 

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glass half fool

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The great thing about digging bottles is there are so many different sizes shapes and colors of glass that you always have a chance to find something that will be new to your collection I like IMG 6180
 

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