Lost Treasures of the Orient - 1911

Old Bookaroo

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Dec 4, 2008
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In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, from time-to-time Sunday newspapers would run stories of buried, lost, and sunken treasure, lost mines in the Great Southwest or down in Old Mexico, and other ripping yarns of misplaced fortunes and the adventures of those who hunted them.

In that spirit, and because it is a holiday weekend, here's a fair sample from the faded pages of a very rare magazine.


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TRUE ADVENTURERS are men of few words, and generally they say their say quietly. And when the other fellow is doing the talking they prefer having him get to the point quickly.


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Good luck to all,

The Old Bookaroo
 

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Hello bookaroo

There is a bit of truth to the buried treasure stories relating to temple in java and Sumatra.

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On Sumatra treasure has been recovered from ancient temples from a kingdom that destroyed that's city once stood over water. today it is a busy port. The kingdom of Srivijaya began in Palembang, a city located on the Musi River on the island of Sumatra
The locals have been fishing treasure out in secret for years to antique dealers.
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they have been fishing treasure out of the river mouth for years.

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So some times there treasure yarns have grain of truth to them.

Great find as always Bookaroo.

Crow
 

Hello bookaroo

There is a bit of truth to the buried treasure stories relating to temple in java and Sumatra.

View attachment 2151219
View attachment 2151220
View attachment 2151221

On Sumatra treasure has been recovered from ancient temples from a kingdom that destroyed that's city once stood over water. today it is a busy port. The kingdom of Srivijaya began in Palembang, a city located on the Musi River on the island of Sumatra
The locals have been fishing treasure out in secret for years to antique dealers.
View attachment 2151222

View attachment 2151223

they have been fishing treasure out of the river mouth for years.

View attachment 2151224

View attachment 2151225

View attachment 2151226

View attachment 2151227

View attachment 2151228

View attachment 2151229View attachment 2151230

View attachment 2151231

View attachment 2151232

So some times there treasure yarns have grain of truth to them.

Great find as always Bookaroo.

Crow

Crow - Always a pleasure to read your posts and those photos are great! That's the real deal.

Good luck to all,

The Old Bookaroo
 

Hello Bookaroo.

For many years the kingdom was thought to be a myth. Sanskrit document reveled the presence of this once flourishing kingdom almost totally unknown to westerners.

Srivijaya empire, maritime and commercial kingdom that flourished between the 7th and the 13th centuries, largely in what is now Indonesia. The kingdom originated in Palembang on the island of Sumatra and soon extended its influence and controlled the Strait of Malacca.

Srivijaya was an important centre for the expansion of Buddhism from the 7th to 11th century AD. Srivijaya was the first polity to dominate much of western Maritime Southeast Asia. Due to its location, Srivijaya developed complex technology utilizing maritime resources.

Wherever the Srivijayan empire traveled, they brought monks to spread the word. Buddhist education provided by Srivijayan monks was crucial in the spread of Buddhism through South East Asia. Lands conquered by the empire were successfully converted to the religion.

Srivijaya was also a religious centre in the region. It adhered to Mahayana Buddhism and soon became the stopping point for Chinese Buddhist pilgrims on their way to India. This led to huge depositories of artifact gems and gold donated by passing pilgrims to the temples for veneration.

The Cholan invasion led to the fall of the Sailendra Dynasty of Srivijaya and the Chola invasion also coincides with return voyage of the great Bengali Buddhist scholar Atiśa (c. 982–1054) from Sumatra to India and Tibet in 1025 CE.

Decline and Fall of Srivijaya happened because
Srivijaya presented a tempting target for foreign powers and for pirates. In 1025, Rajendra Chola of the Chola Empire based in southern India attacked some of the Srivijayan Kingdom's key ports in the first of a series of raids that would last at least 20 years.

It was these raids that devastated the kingdom forcing temples monks to bury treasure exactly like the Vikings did to settlements around the British isles. The kingdom collapsed and never recovered and went into decline. The Buddhist monasteries fell in decline.

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Sumatra was known as the island of gold and Dynasty of Srivijaya rivaled in magnificence any Inca dynasty ruler covered in gold.

Here reconstruction of what a Srivijaya noble women wore. below.

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Today many monasteries have been destroyed. Some times the jungle reveal its secret just as elusive and enticing as any south American culture.

Crow
 

Hello bookaroo

There is a bit of truth to the buried treasure stories relating to temple in java and Sumatra.

View attachment 2151219
View attachment 2151220
View attachment 2151221

On Sumatra treasure has been recovered from ancient temples from a kingdom that destroyed that's city once stood over water. today it is a busy port. The kingdom of Srivijaya began in Palembang, a city located on the Musi River on the island of Sumatra
The locals have been fishing treasure out in secret for years to antique dealers.
View attachment 2151222

View attachment 2151223

they have been fishing treasure out of the river mouth for years.

View attachment 2151224

View attachment 2151225

View attachment 2151226

View attachment 2151227

View attachment 2151228

View attachment 2151229View attachment 2151230

View attachment 2151231

View attachment 2151232

So some times there treasure yarns have grain of truth to them.

Great find as always Bookaroo.

Crow

Ahoy, Crow!

Is that diver wearing a DIY hookah? I very much doubt the "dive belt" chain around his waist has a quick release buckle.

Good luck to all,

The Old Bookaroo
 

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