Tallio!! I dug a Rev War (?) button and my first REAL Cob! (pun intended)

DownNDirty

Bronze Member
Jun 1, 2015
2,178
3,207
South Carolina
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
Minelab Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Those of you who read my last post know that I recently dug what I thought was my first Spanish cob, but unfortunately turned out to be a contemporary counterfeit. Still a cool find but not the same as the real thing.

Sunday I headed back to a coastal area where I had previously scouted in search of a very old site I had read about while doing some research. On the way to the target location my buddy and I tried another promising spot and had enough luck to make us want to go back there later on. He dug a brass button and I found a square nail, which are good signs that an 18th-19th century home site may be close by. Other than the nail my only find from that spot was this "Tallio" cuff link-a first for me. These were worn by fox hunting enthusiasts in the late 1700s.

20180912_120304.jpg 20180912_120510.jpg

Not finding a lot we headed out in search of the other site. Not long after we started hunting there it became clear that we had found it; the age and quality of the finds that followed told me that all the research was well worth the effort.

After digging a few trash targets (mainly fishing sinkers) I hit on a promising signal about 5 inches deep. When I dug out the target I could see that it was a small flat disk with an irregular shape. Could it be? Nah, I couldn't be that lucky, not after digging a counterfeit cob a couple of weeks ago. But as soon as I rinsed the dirt away there it was-a beautiful 1730 one real Spanish cob with tons of detail!

20180910_091030.jpg 20180909_155417.jpg

Man I did the happy dance right then and there-what an adrenaline rush! My first cob-and there was no doubt that this one is the genuine article. Minted in Mexico City in 1730, which was one of the last few years that cobs were struck there.

20180911_123810.jpg 20180911_123714.jpg

After the buzz wore off a little it was time to get back it. Not long after the cob I dug what I thought was a large copper but turned out to be a pewter coat button. Then an early brass buckle.

20180912_111434.jpg 20180911_193852.jpg

Another interesting target was this "Operator" tag/badge from Charleston dated 1942. I'm having a hard time identifying it-any input would be appreciated.

20180912_111100.jpg

I dug another pewter button and put it in the finds box not thinking much of it. It wasn't until I was cleaning the finds that night that I realized it has the letters "PN" on the back. There has been a debate about these buttons for years. Many people say that they were worn by American troops in the Revolutionary War, possibly by Francis Marion's men. Almost all of the ones that have been recovered have come from the Lowcountry area of South Carolina as did this one, and most from known areas of Rev War activity. The button I dug Sunday is pictured next to another "PN" button I dug a couple of years ago at a Rev War campsite.

20180911_131357.jpg 20180911_125604.jpg

20180911_194335.jpg

Other finds at the site included a pewter spoon handle (1700s), a nickel silver fork from about 1930, brass escutcheons and other decorative pieces, and the neck of a very early black glass bottle.

20180911_140311.jpg 20180911_140228.jpg

20180911_140424.jpg 20180911_140146.jpg

A lot of lead was dug also, some old and plenty of fishing sinkers. A couple of pieces look like they could be flint holder pads for flintlock muskets.

20180911_140329.jpg 20180911_182817.jpg

Here are all of my finds for the day, and a picture of the three best ones. All i all it was a great day of detecting, one that I will remember for a long time. Can't wait to get back to the honey hole!

20180911_131515.jpg

20180911_184756.jpg
 

Last edited:
Upvote 56

tnt-hunter

Bronze Member
Apr 20, 2018
1,801
9,249
Mountain Maryland
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
9
Detector(s) used
Fisher CZ-21, Minelab Equinix 800, ,Garret AT Pro,
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting

Student of History

Tenderfoot
Apr 4, 2015
7
10
Detector(s) used
Nautillus DMC 2B
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
Great coin,congratulations! I have heard the theory about the connection of the P.N. button to the Rev War. Although I'm not 100 % convinced my only P.N. came from a Rev War camp so it's very possible.
View attachment 1631524 View attachment 1631525
Robert Milburn here, I saw this when researching the PN buttons for an article I am working on a book about plain gilt plate and other civilian/no device buttons commonly found in North America. I have a flat one, and one similar to yours but black in color from oxidization. I was wondering if you still have the button and if I could use your excellent pictures in my book. If you will, the diameter and thickness from the highest point would be useful. I will of course credit you, and your photographs. when I finally finish it. Thanks.
 

CRUSADER

Gold Member
May 25, 2007
40,890
45,653
ENGLAND
🥇 Banner finds
27
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
XP Deus II v0.6 with 11" Coil
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Congrats, still got a Cob on my list, so I would be very happy to tick this one off - well done
 

JohnnyMac

Bronze Member
Mar 30, 2012
1,319
1,732
South Jersey
Detector(s) used
Nox,,Whites Eagle Spectrum,Whites Coinmaster 6000 DI Pro
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
Those of you who read my last post know that I recently dug what I thought was my first Spanish cob, but unfortunately turned out to be a contemporary counterfeit. Still a cool find but not the same as the real thing.

Sunday I headed back to a coastal area where I had previously scouted in search of a very old site I had read about while doing some research. On the way to the target location my buddy and I tried another promising spot and had enough luck to make us want to go back there later on. He dug a brass button and I found a square nail, which are good signs that an 18th-19th century home site may be close by. Other than the nail my only find from that spot was this "Tallio" cuff link-a first for me. These were worn by fox hunting enthusiasts in the late 1700s.

View attachment 1631338 View attachment 1631337

Not finding a lot we headed out in search of the other site. Not long after we started hunting there it became clear that we had found it; the age and quality of the finds that followed told me that all the research was well worth the effort.

After digging a few trash targets (mainly fishing sinkers) I hit on a promising signal about 5 inches deep. When I dug out the target I could see that it was a small flat disk with an irregular shape. Could it be? Nah, I couldn't be that lucky, not after digging a counterfeit cob a couple of weeks ago. But as soon as I rinsed the dirt away there it was-a beautiful 1730 one real Spanish cob with tons of detail!

View attachment 1631342 View attachment 1631343

Man I did the happy dance right then and there-what an adrenaline rush! My first cob-and there was no doubt that this one is the genuine article. Minted in Mexico City in 1730, which was one of the last few years that cobs were struck there.

View attachment 1631344 View attachment 1631345

After the buzz wore off a little it was time to get back it. Not long after the cob I dug what I thought was a large copper but turned out to be a pewter coat button. Then an early brass buckle.

View attachment 1631346 View attachment 1631347

Another interesting target was this "Operator" tag/badge from Charleston dated 1942. I'm having a hard time identifying it-any input would be appreciated.

View attachment 1631348

I dug another pewter button and put it in the finds box not thinking much of it. It wasn't until I was cleaning the finds that night that I realized it has the letters "PN" on the back. There has been a debate about these buttons for years. Many people say that they were worn by American troops in the Revolutionary War, possibly by Francis Marion's men. Almost all of the ones that have been recovered have come from the Lowcountry area of South Carolina as did this one, and most from known areas of Rev War activity. The button I dug Sunday is pictured next to another "PN" button I dug a couple of years ago at a Rev War campsite.

View attachment 1631352 View attachment 1631353

View attachment 1631354

Other finds at the site included a pewter spoon handle (1700s), a nickel silver fork from about 1930, brass escutcheons and other decorative pieces, and the neck of a very early black glass bottle.

View attachment 1631355 View attachment 1631356

View attachment 1631357 View attachment 1631358

A lot of lead was dug also, some old and plenty of fishing sinkers. A couple of pieces look like they could be flint holder pads for flintlock muskets.

View attachment 1631359 View attachment 1631360

Here are all of my finds for the day, and a picture of the three best ones. All i all it was a great day of detecting, one that I will remember for a long time. Can't wait to get back to the honey hole!

View attachment 1631361

View attachment 1631362
Wow congrats!
 

michael NY

Full Member
Nov 4, 2007
249
1,048
USA
Detector(s) used
Etrac, Coinstrike, F70, Explorer XS, Sovereign XS, Spectrum, IDX PRO.
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
Those of you who read my last post know that I recently dug what I thought was my first Spanish cob, but unfortunately turned out to be a contemporary counterfeit. Still a cool find but not the same as the real thing.

Sunday I headed back to a coastal area where I had previously scouted in search of a very old site I had read about while doing some research. On the way to the target location my buddy and I tried another promising spot and had enough luck to make us want to go back there later on. He dug a brass button and I found a square nail, which are good signs that an 18th-19th century home site may be close by. Other than the nail my only find from that spot was this "Tallio" cuff link-a first for me. These were worn by fox hunting enthusiasts in the late 1700s.

View attachment 1631338 View attachment 1631337

Not finding a lot we headed out in search of the other site. Not long after we started hunting there it became clear that we had found it; the age and quality of the finds that followed told me that all the research was well worth the effort.

After digging a few trash targets (mainly fishing sinkers) I hit on a promising signal about 5 inches deep. When I dug out the target I could see that it was a small flat disk with an irregular shape. Could it be? Nah, I couldn't be that lucky, not after digging a counterfeit cob a couple of weeks ago. But as soon as I rinsed the dirt away there it was-a beautiful 1730 one real Spanish cob with tons of detail!

View attachment 1631342 View attachment 1631343

Man I did the happy dance right then and there-what an adrenaline rush! My first cob-and there was no doubt that this one is the genuine article. Minted in Mexico City in 1730, which was one of the last few years that cobs were struck there.

View attachment 1631344 View attachment 1631345

After the buzz wore off a little it was time to get back it. Not long after the cob I dug what I thought was a large copper but turned out to be a pewter coat button. Then an early brass buckle.

View attachment 1631346 View attachment 1631347

Another interesting target was this "Operator" tag/badge from Charleston dated 1942. I'm having a hard time identifying it-any input would be appreciated.

View attachment 1631348

I dug another pewter button and put it in the finds box not thinking much of it. It wasn't until I was cleaning the finds that night that I realized it has the letters "PN" on the back. There has been a debate about these buttons for years. Many people say that they were worn by American troops in the Revolutionary War, possibly by Francis Marion's men. Almost all of the ones that have been recovered have come from the Lowcountry area of South Carolina as did this one, and most from known areas of Rev War activity. The button I dug Sunday is pictured next to another "PN" button I dug a couple of years ago at a Rev War campsite.

View attachment 1631352 View attachment 1631353

View attachment 1631354

Other finds at the site included a pewter spoon handle (1700s), a nickel silver fork from about 1930, brass escutcheons and other decorative pieces, and the neck of a very early black glass bottle.

View attachment 1631355 View attachment 1631356

View attachment 1631357 View attachment 1631358

A lot of lead was dug also, some old and plenty of fishing sinkers. A couple of pieces look like they could be flint holder pads for flintlock muskets.

View attachment 1631359 View attachment 1631360

Here are all of my finds for the day, and a picture of the three best ones. All i all it was a great day of detecting, one that I will remember for a long time. Can't wait to get back to the honey hole!

View attachment 1631361

View attachment 1631362
Beautiful cobb
 

Hunk-a-lead

Bronze Member
Dec 20, 2020
2,172
3,394
Kansas City
Detector(s) used
Nokta Legend, Predator Phoenix Shovel
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
Those of you who read my last post know that I recently dug what I thought was my first Spanish cob, but unfortunately turned out to be a contemporary counterfeit. Still a cool find but not the same as the real thing.

Sunday I headed back to a coastal area where I had previously scouted in search of a very old site I had read about while doing some research. On the way to the target location my buddy and I tried another promising spot and had enough luck to make us want to go back there later on. He dug a brass button and I found a square nail, which are good signs that an 18th-19th century home site may be close by. Other than the nail my only find from that spot was this "Tallio" cuff link-a first for me. These were worn by fox hunting enthusiasts in the late 1700s.

View attachment 1631338 View attachment 1631337

Not finding a lot we headed out in search of the other site. Not long after we started hunting there it became clear that we had found it; the age and quality of the finds that followed told me that all the research was well worth the effort.

After digging a few trash targets (mainly fishing sinkers) I hit on a promising signal about 5 inches deep. When I dug out the target I could see that it was a small flat disk with an irregular shape. Could it be? Nah, I couldn't be that lucky, not after digging a counterfeit cob a couple of weeks ago. But as soon as I rinsed the dirt away there it was-a beautiful 1730 one real Spanish cob with tons of detail!

View attachment 1631342 View attachment 1631343

Man I did the happy dance right then and there-what an adrenaline rush! My first cob-and there was no doubt that this one is the genuine article. Minted in Mexico City in 1730, which was one of the last few years that cobs were struck there.

View attachment 1631344 View attachment 1631345

After the buzz wore off a little it was time to get back it. Not long after the cob I dug what I thought was a large copper but turned out to be a pewter coat button. Then an early brass buckle.

View attachment 1631346 View attachment 1631347

Another interesting target was this "Operator" tag/badge from Charleston dated 1942. I'm having a hard time identifying it-any input would be appreciated.

View attachment 1631348

I dug another pewter button and put it in the finds box not thinking much of it. It wasn't until I was cleaning the finds that night that I realized it has the letters "PN" on the back. There has been a debate about these buttons for years. Many people say that they were worn by American troops in the Revolutionary War, possibly by Francis Marion's men. Almost all of the ones that have been recovered have come from the Lowcountry area of South Carolina as did this one, and most from known areas of Rev War activity. The button I dug Sunday is pictured next to another "PN" button I dug a couple of years ago at a Rev War campsite.

View attachment 1631352 View attachment 1631353

View attachment 1631354

Other finds at the site included a pewter spoon handle (1700s), a nickel silver fork from about 1930, brass escutcheons and other decorative pieces, and the neck of a very early black glass bottle.

View attachment 1631355 View attachment 1631356

View attachment 1631357 View attachment 1631358

A lot of lead was dug also, some old and plenty of fishing sinkers. A couple of pieces look like they could be flint holder pads for flintlock muskets.

View attachment 1631359 View attachment 1631360

Here are all of my finds for the day, and a picture of the three best ones. All i all it was a great day of detecting, one that I will remember for a long time. Can't wait to get back to the honey hole!

View attachment 1631361

View attachment 1631362
big time gratz! Great saves
 

cannonball

Hero Member
Feb 20, 2010
746
3,614
East Coast NJ
Detector(s) used
DEUS 11 Fisher F75ltd,TDI Minelab Excailber
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Those of you who read my last post know that I recently dug what I thought was my first Spanish cob, but unfortunately turned out to be a contemporary counterfeit. Still a cool find but not the same as the real thing.

Sunday I headed back to a coastal area where I had previously scouted in search of a very old site I had read about while doing some research. On the way to the target location my buddy and I tried another promising spot and had enough luck to make us want to go back there later on. He dug a brass button and I found a square nail, which are good signs that an 18th-19th century home site may be close by. Other than the nail my only find from that spot was this "Tallio" cuff link-a first for me. These were worn by fox hunting enthusiasts in the late 1700s.

View attachment 1631338 View attachment 1631337

Not finding a lot we headed out in search of the other site. Not long after we started hunting there it became clear that we had found it; the age and quality of the finds that followed told me that all the research was well worth the effort.

After digging a few trash targets (mainly fishing sinkers) I hit on a promising signal about 5 inches deep. When I dug out the target I could see that it was a small flat disk with an irregular shape. Could it be? Nah, I couldn't be that lucky, not after digging a counterfeit cob a couple of weeks ago. But as soon as I rinsed the dirt away there it was-a beautiful 1730 one real Spanish cob with tons of detail!

View attachment 1631342 View attachment 1631343

Man I did the happy dance right then and there-what an adrenaline rush! My first cob-and there was no doubt that this one is the genuine article. Minted in Mexico City in 1730, which was one of the last few years that cobs were struck there.

View attachment 1631344 View attachment 1631345

After the buzz wore off a little it was time to get back it. Not long after the cob I dug what I thought was a large copper but turned out to be a pewter coat button. Then an early brass buckle.

View attachment 1631346 View attachment 1631347

Another interesting target was this "Operator" tag/badge from Charleston dated 1942. I'm having a hard time identifying it-any input would be appreciated.

View attachment 1631348

I dug another pewter button and put it in the finds box not thinking much of it. It wasn't until I was cleaning the finds that night that I realized it has the letters "PN" on the back. There has been a debate about these buttons for years. Many people say that they were worn by American troops in the Revolutionary War, possibly by Francis Marion's men. Almost all of the ones that have been recovered have come from the Lowcountry area of South Carolina as did this one, and most from known areas of Rev War activity. The button I dug Sunday is pictured next to another "PN" button I dug a couple of years ago at a Rev War campsite.

View attachment 1631352 View attachment 1631353

View attachment 1631354

Other finds at the site included a pewter spoon handle (1700s), a nickel silver fork from about 1930, brass escutcheons and other decorative pieces, and the neck of a very early black glass bottle.

View attachment 1631355 View attachment 1631356

View attachment 1631357 View attachment 1631358

A lot of lead was dug also, some old and plenty of fishing sinkers. A couple of pieces look like they could be flint holder pads for flintlock muskets.

View attachment 1631359 View attachment 1631360

Here are all of my finds for the day, and a picture of the three best ones. All i all it was a great day of detecting, one that I will remember for a long time. Can't wait to get back to the honey hole!

View attachment 1631361

View attachment 1631362
Outstanding finds1 The brass plate look a little bit like a musket side plate. Not many cob coins come up in this country. Congratulations
 

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