✅ SOLVED Civil War Bullets that need Id-ing

Breezie

Gold Member
Oct 3, 2009
6,265
2,102
North Carolina
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
White's DFX & Spectrum~Garrett's Pro-Pointer~VibraProbe
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
Hey Y'all,
As most of you know, I am not the 'Civil War Bullet Queen' so I need some help on a few bullets. If you need any more measurements, let me know. Thanks in advance for the help.
:)
Breezie

TNet1.jpg

TNet2.jpg

TNet3.jpg

11.jpg

12.jpg

13.jpg

14.jpg
 
Last edited:

smokeythecat

Gold Member
Nov 22, 2012
20,439
39,883
Maryland
🥇 Banner finds
10
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
XP Deus II
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I think the first one is a colt, second one a St. Louis aresenal, but memory stinks these days. Three and four are fired.
 
Upvote 0

TheCannonballGuy

Gold Member
Feb 24, 2006
6,422
12,438
Occupied CSA (Richmond VA)
Detector(s) used
White's 6000, Nautilus DMC-1, Minelab
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Smokeythecat gave the correct ID for the two he named. I'll expand on what he said, and cover bullets 3 and 4.
Bullet #1: Colt .44 Revolver bullet, Confederate version, made at the Richmond Lab.
Bullet #2: US St. Louis Arsenal .36-caliber, identified in some old bullet-books as a Remington but it has been proven by civil war era US Small Arms Ordnance records to be a design made only at the US St. Louis MO Arsenal. See "A Handbook Of Civil War Bullets & Cartridges."
Bullet #3: Kinda mangled so this is my best guess. Appears to be a US .36-caliber Colt. Additional photos taken from different angles could change that guess.
Bullet #4: An excellent example of the effects of being hard-rammed into a revolver's dirty cylinder and then fired out of its rifled barrel... without hitting anything but air until the bullet ran out of energy and plopped gently to earth. If there are 6 rifling-grooves, it was most probably fired out of a US Starr .36 Revolver or CS Griswold & Grier .36 Revolver. If that bullet has 7 rifling-grooves, it was most likely fired out of a US Colt .36 Revolver. Because the riflling-grooves show a "left-hand twist" I suspect there are 7 grooves, because (if I recall correctly) Colt used "left-hand twist" rifling in his revolvers.
 
Upvote 0
OP
Breezie

Breezie

Gold Member
Oct 3, 2009
6,265
2,102
North Carolina
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
White's DFX & Spectrum~Garrett's Pro-Pointer~VibraProbe
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
Smokey & CannonBallGuy THANK YOU!!! Pete, you are truly a walking encyclopedia! I appreciate all of the information, and will mark this one SOLVED.
Southern Smiles :)
Breezie
 
Upvote 0

Davers

Gold Member
Jan 8, 2013
8,051
7,014
N.of , I-285...GA
Detector(s) used
Whites Spc xlt & Tesoro Tejon- Now back ...Fisher 1266-X. TRX Pointer. New .Teknetics G2 + . New AT Pro .
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Smokeythecat gave the correct ID for the two he named. I'll expand on what he said, and cover bullets 3 and 4.
Bullet #1: Colt .44 Revolver bullet, Confederate version, made at the Richmond Lab.
Bullet #2: US St. Louis Arsenal .36-caliber, identified in some old bullet-books as a Remington but it has been proven by civil war era US Small Arms Ordnance records to be a design made only at the US St. Louis MO Arsenal. See "A Handbook Of Civil War Bullets & Cartridges."
Bullet #3: Kinda mangled so this is my best guess. Appears to be a US .36-caliber Colt. Additional photos taken from different angles could change that guess.
Bullet #4: An excellent example of the effects of being hard-rammed into a revolver's dirty cylinder and then fired out of its rifled barrel... without hitting anything but air until the bullet ran out of energy and plopped gently to earth. If there are 6 rifling-grooves, it was most probably fired out of a US Starr .36 Revolver or CS Griswold & Grier .36 Revolver. If that bullet has 7 rifling-grooves, it was most likely fired out of a US Colt .36 Revolver. Because the riflling-grooves show a "left-hand twist" I suspect there are 7 grooves, because (if I recall correctly) Colt used "left-hand twist" rifling in his revolvers.

Great ID on those Fired bullets , & good eye on the 'ram job'.
Ill bet I have some fired Pistol bullets that are not with my other Civil War Bullets.
 
Upvote 0

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top