I guess I'm building a Model-T...

TomW244

Hero Member
Sep 2, 2017
976
2,180
Florida
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Minelab Equinox 600, Garrett AT Pro, Garrett Pinpointer, Bounty Hunter Gold Digger
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I've been searching my newish property for the last several weeks, and I've been finding a lot of stuff that dates from the mid 1910's to the mid 1930's. (And I do mean a LOT of stuff!) I've also been finding railroad-related items (including blacksmith tools) as there was once a railroad which ran next to what is currently my land. The hunting has been difficult, as most of the property is covered in newer-growth trees and unlike how you folks in the North have it, the ridiculously warm weather in my part of Florida has ensured that the vines and other forest plants continue to flourish. (I know, I know...at least I'm able to dig this time of year!)

What has been fun, though, is finding various Ford Model-T car parts scattered across several acres of the property. Based on what my friend and I have been finding, whoever lived here did a lot of work on Model-T's over the years. That, or he blew up a couple of them up with dynamite. At any rate, here are those specific finds, to date. Any time-frame information I might add regarding the finds is based solely on research I found online. I'm not a Model-T expert (or layman, for that matter). If any of you have more specific (or more correct) information, please feel free to chime in! I'm on this forum to learn and share (in that order)!

This is an overall pic of the Model-T finds.

All Finds (02-12-2022).JPG


Below are battery-related items. The first image is a battery connection "cable" (actually comprised of pressed copper plates!) next to a battery connection post. (You can see the "N" for "negative" at the top left of the part.) The second pic below is of one complete and one broken carbon battery rod used for "horseless carriages".

Battery Connector and Post.JPG
Carbon Battery Rods.JPG


This is a connector end (and partial cable) for a starter.

Starter Connector End and Cable.JPG


Here is a Champion spark plug, which is embossed with the words "Champion" and the Ford script logo below it. (It's difficult to see, but there is a tiny bit of red paint on a small portion of the embossed section of the spark plug. From the information I found online, Champion sent these spark plugs directly to Ford dealerships at the time, and the Ford script logo was not found on the spark plugs available for non-dealership purchase.

Champion Spark Plug.JPG
Champion Spark Plug Closeup.jpg


My friend found this oversized spark plug, which is a "Kopper King Mfd. by The Sharp". We found info online that indicated it was used for "Rat Rods" (the early street racing versions of Model-T's). I found a print advertisement for this exact spark plug from a 1917 newspaper, however I don't know the actual date range of it's manufacture and distribution.

DSCF0239.JPG
DSCF0241.JPG


This is the top piece of a Holley carburetor (with a patent date of December 22, 1914). It was used in Model-T's manufactured from 1915-1919.

Holley Carburetor Piece.JPG


Here are two different radiator caps from Model-T's. The one on the left, which has the post sticking up through the middle, most likely had some form of decorative ornament attached. (In other words, I guess we've been after-market customizing our cars since there have been cars!)

Radiator Caps.JPG


Here are two different tire valve stems (including two different manufacturers). The top valve stem (found yesterday) was manufactured by the Dills-Cleveland company (and dates at earliest from 1924 or 1925). The lower valve stem was made by the Schrader company. From the info I found, it was possibly made for the spare tire and is called a "double bend" or "s" valve stem. I'm not sure of the full date range for these, but I did find a catalogue page from 1929 which depicted a drawing of the same valve stem.

Tire Valve Stems.JPG


These are two different valve stem covers or caps (which fit neither of the valve stems pictured above!) The top valve stem cover is a standard Schrader which we all know and associate with the Model-T. The lower valve stem cover is also a Schrader product, but it's wider and made of much thicker brass. From what I found doing research, this was the earlier version of the two and may go back to as early as 1907.

Schrader Valve Stem Covers.JPG


And finally, here is a Ford Model-T hubcap. (I found this item today - so this is today's find!) It is actually very heavy for it's size, as it is made of nickel-plated cast iron. It's hard to read, but the raised lettering spells "Ford Made in USA". Based on info from a Model-T forum website, this hubcap version was used on Model-T's made between 1912 and 1916.

Hubcap 1912-1916.JPG


As always, thank you for taking the time to view my post. I know that none of this information is ground-breaking, but most of it was new to me and I really enjoyed researching the history behind these items.

Be safe, have fun, and may your next hunt bring you joy!
 
Upvote 25

OH..POPS

Full Member
Dec 18, 2021
143
289
Medway Ohio
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Pops old one
Garrett Ace 400
Bounty Hunter
Sharp Shooter II
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Grew up with motor heads and they would die for some of what you found. Nice job. Keep us updated on more auto finds would ya
 
OP
TomW244

TomW244

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Sep 2, 2017
976
2,180
Florida
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  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Grew up with motor heads and they would die for some of what you found. Nice job. Keep us updated on more auto finds would ya
Thank you, and will do!
 

l.cutler

Bronze Member
Dec 2, 2006
2,469
1,588
NEPA
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The only thing I can add is the hubcap is a very late one as it is the type used on wire spoked wheels, not the wood spoked. Wire wheels were optional in 1926 and standard in 1927.
 
OP
TomW244

TomW244

Hero Member
Sep 2, 2017
976
2,180
Florida
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  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
The only thing I can add is the hubcap is a very late one as it is the type used on wire spoked wheels, not the wood spoked. Wire wheels were optional in 1926 and standard in 1927.
Thanks! I appreciate the information!
 

bologna321

Bronze Member
Aug 26, 2017
1,127
2,707
SW MO
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Garrett AT PRO, Garrett Ultra GTA 500, Equinox 600
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You just helped me solve a mystery, I have 2 of the model t radiator caps and could never figure out what they were until now.
 
OP
TomW244

TomW244

Hero Member
Sep 2, 2017
976
2,180
Florida
Detector(s) used
Minelab Equinox 600, Garrett AT Pro, Garrett Pinpointer, Bounty Hunter Gold Digger
Primary Interest:
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  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #10
I’m
You just helped me solve a mystery, I have 2 of the model t radiator caps and could never figure out what they were until now.
You just helped me solve a mystery, I have 2 of the model t radiator caps and could never figure out what they were until now.
I’m glad my post helped, but as you can see, there are a LOT of very knowledgeable folks on this site, and they’re always willing to help out with information. If you’re ever really stuck on identifying something, post it in the “What Is It?” Forum. It’s kinda humbling to see how quickly someone here can nail the ID for you. 😊
 

Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
15,449
26,887
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
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🏆 Honorable Mentions:
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XP Deus 2
Primary Interest:
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I've been searching my newish property for the last several weeks, and I've been finding a lot of stuff that dates from the mid 1910's to the mid 1930's. (And I do mean a LOT of stuff!) I've also been finding railroad-related items (including blacksmith tools) as there was once a railroad which ran next to what is currently my land. The hunting has been difficult, as most of the property is covered in newer-growth trees and unlike how you folks in the North have it, the ridiculously warm weather in my part of Florida has ensured that the vines and other forest plants continue to flourish. (I know, I know...at least I'm able to dig this time of year!)

What has been fun, though, is finding various Ford Model-T car parts scattered across several acres of the property. Based on what my friend and I have been finding, whoever lived here did a lot of work on Model-T's over the years. That, or he blew up a couple of them up with dynamite. At any rate, here are those specific finds, to date. Any time-frame information I might add regarding the finds is based solely on research I found online. I'm not a Model-T expert (or layman, for that matter). If any of you have more specific (or more correct) information, please feel free to chime in! I'm on this forum to learn and share (in that order)!

This is an overall pic of the Model-T finds.

View attachment 2009715

Below are battery-related items. The first image is a battery connection "cable" (actually comprised of pressed copper plates!) next to a battery connection post. (You can see the "N" for "negative" at the top left of the part.) The second pic below is of one complete and one broken carbon battery rod used for "horseless carriages".

View attachment 2009716 View attachment 2009717

This is a connector end (and partial cable) for a starter.

View attachment 2009726

Here is a Champion spark plug, which is embossed with the words "Champion" and the Ford script logo below it. (It's difficult to see, but there is a tiny bit of red paint on a small portion of the embossed section of the spark plug. From the information I found online, Champion sent these spark plugs directly to Ford dealerships at the time, and the Ford script logo was not found on the spark plugs available for non-dealership purchase.

View attachment 2009718 View attachment 2009719

My friend found this oversized spark plug, which is a "Kopper King Mfd. by The Sharp". We found info online that indicated it was used for "Rat Rods" (the early street racing versions of Model-T's). I found a print advertisement for this exact spark plug from a 1917 newspaper, however I don't know the actual date range of it's manufacture and distribution.

View attachment 2009724 View attachment 2009725

This is the top piece of a Holley carburetor (with a patent date of December 22, 1914). It was used in Model-T's manufactured from 1915-1919.

View attachment 2009728

Here are two different radiator caps from Model-T's. The one on the left, which has the post sticking up through the middle, most likely had some form of decorative ornament attached. (In other words, I guess we've been after-market customizing our cars since there have been cars!)

View attachment 2009729

Here are two different tire valve stems (including two different manufacturers). The top valve stem (found yesterday) was manufactured by the Dills-Cleveland company (and dates at earliest from 1924 or 1925). The lower valve stem was made by the Schrader company. From the info I found, it was possibly made for the spare tire and is called a "double bend" or "s" valve stem. I'm not sure of the full date range for these, but I did find a catalogue page from 1929 which depicted a drawing of the same valve stem.

View attachment 2009730

These are two different valve stem covers or caps (which fit neither of the valve stems pictured above!) The top valve stem cover is a standard Schrader which we all know and associate with the Model-T. The lower valve stem cover is also a Schrader product, but it's wider and made of much thicker brass. From what I found doing research, this was the earlier version of the two and may go back to as early as 1907.

View attachment 2009732

And finally, here is a Ford Model-T hubcap. (I found this item today - so this is today's find!) It is actually very heavy for it's size, as it is made of nickel-plated cast iron. It's hard to read, but the raised lettering spells "Ford Made in USA". Based on info from a Model-T forum website, this hubcap version was used on Model-T's made between 1912 and 1916.

View attachment 2009733

As always, thank you for taking the time to view my post. I know that none of this information is ground-breaking, but most of it was new to me and I really enjoyed researching the history behind these items.

Be safe, have fun, and may your next hunt bring you joy!
Nice!!! Congrats!!!
 

Gare

Gold Member
Dec 30, 2012
5,179
9,955
Canton Ohio Area
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
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Presently using Deus's have Minelabs, Nokta's Tesoro's Have them all . Have WAY to many need to get rid of some
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I thinks this is what the Johnny cash some was about LOL Nice digs


One Piece at a Time

 

Hunk-a-lead

Bronze Member
Dec 20, 2020
2,043
3,143
Kansas City
Detector(s) used
Nokta Legend, Garrett Carrot, Predator Phoenix Shovel, White's hand digger
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I've been searching my newish property for the last several weeks, and I've been finding a lot of stuff that dates from the mid 1910's to the mid 1930's. (And I do mean a LOT of stuff!) I've also been finding railroad-related items (including blacksmith tools) as there was once a railroad which ran next to what is currently my land. The hunting has been difficult, as most of the property is covered in newer-growth trees and unlike how you folks in the North have it, the ridiculously warm weather in my part of Florida has ensured that the vines and other forest plants continue to flourish. (I know, I know...at least I'm able to dig this time of year!)

What has been fun, though, is finding various Ford Model-T car parts scattered across several acres of the property. Based on what my friend and I have been finding, whoever lived here did a lot of work on Model-T's over the years. That, or he blew up a couple of them up with dynamite. At any rate, here are those specific finds, to date. Any time-frame information I might add regarding the finds is based solely on research I found online. I'm not a Model-T expert (or layman, for that matter). If any of you have more specific (or more correct) information, please feel free to chime in! I'm on this forum to learn and share (in that order)!

This is an overall pic of the Model-T finds.

View attachment 2009715

Below are battery-related items. The first image is a battery connection "cable" (actually comprised of pressed copper plates!) next to a battery connection post. (You can see the "N" for "negative" at the top left of the part.) The second pic below is of one complete and one broken carbon battery rod used for "horseless carriages".

View attachment 2009716 View attachment 2009717

This is a connector end (and partial cable) for a starter.

View attachment 2009726

Here is a Champion spark plug, which is embossed with the words "Champion" and the Ford script logo below it. (It's difficult to see, but there is a tiny bit of red paint on a small portion of the embossed section of the spark plug. From the information I found online, Champion sent these spark plugs directly to Ford dealerships at the time, and the Ford script logo was not found on the spark plugs available for non-dealership purchase.

View attachment 2009718 View attachment 2009719

My friend found this oversized spark plug, which is a "Kopper King Mfd. by The Sharp". We found info online that indicated it was used for "Rat Rods" (the early street racing versions of Model-T's). I found a print advertisement for this exact spark plug from a 1917 newspaper, however I don't know the actual date range of it's manufacture and distribution.

View attachment 2009724 View attachment 2009725

This is the top piece of a Holley carburetor (with a patent date of December 22, 1914). It was used in Model-T's manufactured from 1915-1919.

View attachment 2009728

Here are two different radiator caps from Model-T's. The one on the left, which has the post sticking up through the middle, most likely had some form of decorative ornament attached. (In other words, I guess we've been after-market customizing our cars since there have been cars!)

View attachment 2009729

Here are two different tire valve stems (including two different manufacturers). The top valve stem (found yesterday) was manufactured by the Dills-Cleveland company (and dates at earliest from 1924 or 1925). The lower valve stem was made by the Schrader company. From the info I found, it was possibly made for the spare tire and is called a "double bend" or "s" valve stem. I'm not sure of the full date range for these, but I did find a catalogue page from 1929 which depicted a drawing of the same valve stem.

View attachment 2009730

These are two different valve stem covers or caps (which fit neither of the valve stems pictured above!) The top valve stem cover is a standard Schrader which we all know and associate with the Model-T. The lower valve stem cover is also a Schrader product, but it's wider and made of much thicker brass. From what I found doing research, this was the earlier version of the two and may go back to as early as 1907.

View attachment 2009732

And finally, here is a Ford Model-T hubcap. (I found this item today - so this is today's find!) It is actually very heavy for it's size, as it is made of nickel-plated cast iron. It's hard to read, but the raised lettering spells "Ford Made in USA". Based on info from a Model-T forum website, this hubcap version was used on Model-T's made between 1912 and 1916.

View attachment 2009733

As always, thank you for taking the time to view my post. I know that none of this information is ground-breaking, but most of it was new to me and I really enjoyed researching the history behind these items.

Be safe, have fun, and may your next hunt bring you joy!
great saves and looks like you are having a blast, wtg
 

E-Trac-Ohio

Silver Member
Feb 9, 2020
3,298
4,590
Eastern Ohio
Detector(s) used
XP Deus
Minelab E-Trac
Primary Interest:
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Great finds - congrats !

I've found (2) Model T ignition keys over the years.
Here's a photo of one of them and what the Model T ignition key sales display looked like at a Ford Dealership.
 

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