🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Mystery Man

jhamner

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Dec 2, 2008
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Does anyone recognize this gentleman? I bought the little miniature because I thought it may be John Wilkes Booth but after comparing it to photos of Booth, I'm afraid I messed up!
The miniature is had painted on thick paper-I assume it's a watercolor- and is encased in a gold frame., Dimensions are approximately 2 1/2" tall 1 3/4"wide and 1/4' thick. I know it's a long shot, but I would LOVE to know the identity of this man! Thanks!
 

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CloudKicker0

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Does anyone recognize this gentleman? I bought the little miniature because I thought it may be John Wilkes Booth but after comparing it to photos of Booth, I'm afraid I messed up!
The miniature is had painted on thick paper-I assume it's a watercolor- and is encased in a gold frame., Dimensions are approximately 2 1/2" tall 1 3/4"wide and 1/4' thick. I know it's a long shot, but I would LOVE to know the identity of this man! Thanks!
Just a hunch, Sir Johnathan Depp? 🤣
 
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ANTIQUARIAN

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Could this possibly a hand-coloured photograph as opposed to a miniature painting? Years ago I inherited a c1875 black & white photo of my great, great, grandmother which is an over-painted photograph. :icon_scratch:

These personal mementos were tokens of affection, miniature portraits are handheld paintings generally created with watercolour paint on thin sheets of ivory. These intimate images were carried or worn by both men and women as a means to keep loved ones close at heart, even when they were not physically present.

Shortly after the invention of photography, artists in the United States and Canada began to explore in several ways the possibilities of the photographic image for their own use. Towards the latter part of the 19th century, some artists advertised themselves as “artist-photographers,” reflecting the aura of prestige of photography, which attracted the notice of the general public. As the technical aspects improved, especially in the making of photographs, photographers who did not have artistic talents hired artists to work for them in the photo studio. Their patrons were eager to have photographs resemble painted likenesses. Prominent artists participated actively in producing painted photographs. Photographers prepared enlargements which were then painted over in oils by staff artists. By the 1860s, colored portraits became fashionable and techniques improved rapidly. Methods were found to photo-sensitize the canvas surface on which the enlarged portrait was projected and fixed. The artist then applied paint directly on the image. The finished artwork would later be varnished and placed in an ornamented gilt frame. Frequently, these paintings are not easily recognized as being based directly on a photo image.
 
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jhamner

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jhamner

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Could this possibly a hand-coloured photograph as opposed to a miniature painting? Years ago I inherited a c1875 black & white photo of my great, great, grandmother which is an over-painted photograph. :icon_scratch:

These personal mementos were tokens of affection, miniature portraits are handheld paintings generally created with watercolour paint on thin sheets of ivory. These intimate images were carried or worn by both men and women as a means to keep loved ones close at heart, even when they were not physically present.

Shortly after the invention of photography, artists in the United States and Canada began to explore in several ways the possibilities of the photographic image for their own use. Towards the latter part of the 19th century, some artists advertised themselves as “artist-photographers,” reflecting the aura of prestige of photography, which attracted the notice of the general public. As the technical aspects improved, especially in the making of photographs, photographers who did not have artistic talents hired artists to work for them in the photo studio. Their patrons were eager to have photographs resemble painted likenesses. Prominent artists participated actively in producing painted photographs. Photographers prepared enlargements which were then painted over in oils by staff artists. By the 1860s, colored portraits became fashionable and techniques improved rapidly. Methods were found to photo-sensitize the canvas surface on which the enlarged portrait was projected and fixed. The artist then applied paint directly on the image. The finished artwork would later be varnished and placed in an ornamented gilt frame. Frequently, these paintings are not easily recognized as being based directly on a photo image.
Yes, definitely. That never occurred to me, but now that I read your response, it seems very likely. Thank you SO MUCH for your very detailed and informative response!
 
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jhamner

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traveller777

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I believe it is a portrait of Oliver Hopkinson 1812-1905, by Pensylvania artist John Henry Brown 1818-1891.
I do not know original medium used, although suspect oil. And not sure the medium on yours from the photograph. Very interesting though and thanks for posting.
Thank you very much! There is a close resemblance between the two. Pardon my lack of knowledge, but was Oliver Hopkinson famous? Thanks again!
 
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