Parallel twisted fibers in a matrix

PetesPockets55

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I'm not sure how to ask this, but does anyone here know if there are any known twisted fibers from NA sites that exist?

I was walking our local brackish riverbank today with some buddies and came across a piece of material with old barnacles and juvenile oysters on it. It looked different than the other NA shards at this site but because of the size of it (+-7'x2.5") and the edge looked interesting, I tried to break a small piece off. It broke in the middle of course but wouldn't come apart.

3-3-24-TwistedFibers-Top-Full-Scale.JPG

I realized I could see twisted fibers inside the "matrix" that were running parallel to each other. When taking the images, I also noticed parallel grooves on the outside that seemed to be indicating many rows of the fibers. I can't tell if there are any intersecting fibers connecting the parallel fibers together (as in a net).

Anyways it doesn't seem plausible, but I'm looking at some type of twisted fiber (probably plant, not animal) that may possibly be a net.


I'm hoping someone here can add some insight about
Here's more images and thanks if you can point me to any info on NA fibers.
3-3-24-TwistedFibers-Fiber-9-Embedded-InMatrix-Excellent.JPG
3-3-24-TwistedFibers-Top-Middle-AtCrack-4-Opened-Excellent.JPG
3-3-24-TwistedFibers-Top-Full-Scale.JPG
3-3-24-TwistedFibers-Fiber-10-Embedded-InMatrix-Best-Arrows.jpg
 

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Tnmountains

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It is possible and also possible its hemp rope from a fisherman's net or tie line. Many materials in Fla for rope making even coconut fiber was used. I would try to take them to a local university to identify the fiber.
 

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PetesPockets55

PetesPockets55

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It is possible and also possible its hemp rope from a fisherman's net or tie line. Many materials in Fla for rope making even coconut fiber was used. I would try to take them to a local university to identify the fiber.
Thanks for your reply. I'll look into who might be open/able to assess it. Maybe the University of Florida.
Probably and anchor line or similar type rope that became incrusted with barnacles and such. It doesn't have to be very old for those things to take over. Ask anyone who moors a boat in saltwater. Constant work to keep hull free of barnacles and similar sealife.
Thanks. I agree but couldn't understand the solid matrix surrounding the fibers. The individual strands seem to be parallel to each other instead of twisted around each other. More like what would occur if a group of individual strands of a net were to come to rest on the bottom and then have minerals calcify around them.
 

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PetesPockets55

PetesPockets55

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Thanks again everyone for sharing your thoughts.
I did call up a friend who is an expert in indigenous cultures who thought it wasn't made correctly to be NA or indigenous. He didn't rule out the possibility of being a "pioneer's" net.

He did question whether it could have been a cargo net (if a net at all) but it doesn't seem to be strong enough for unloading stuff off a vessel. That's why my mind went to some form of fishing net.
 

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PetesPockets55

PetesPockets55

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Update (Sheepishly and laughing at myself):
It turns out this is a more modern "invention" and may be part of an erosion control system or maybe a system for oysters to grow on. The surface is very porous.
I found a more intact piece on shore that matched other larger and intact pieces about 50' from shore and can be seen at low tide.
If I had to guess someone wanted to create something that was biodegradable and wouldn't hurt the Indian River lagoon estuary. It may very well have been experimental.

A little back story about the local estuary health and bi-valve dilemma that may have necessitated this material. Because of the pressures on the local estuaries and fish populations back in the 1990's due to gil nets, the nets were banned. They were indiscriminate in what they killed. The fisherman needed some way to make a living so many turned to harvesting the local hard shell clams with rakes, tongs, and by hand. Needless to say, the clam population took a hit. Oysters have been on the decline locally since about the same time.
I believe this may have been an attempted experiment to give oyster larvae something to attach to and grow.
Here's a link for those that are interested.
Indian River Lagoon (Fl)
 

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