Space coast/treasure coast recommendations

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Bender

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i will be in the cocoa beach area for my Xmas holidays this year (22 days). Wondering if there are any pointers, tips for areas to check out with my son (trying to get him hooked on detecting). We have

Thinking about the Sebastian inlet/ampersands areas but really don’t know much about them.

Will be using a garret Atgold and a teknics 4000 (if that matters)

Any info/directions/tips/ would be greatly appreciated

Take care,

Ben
 
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Treasure_Hunter

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so it looks like to me they are talking about archaeologica sites. That is strange I have read many instances where beach combers have actually found Spanish reales, even gold chains from the wrecks and have not heard of any of them being punished in any way. Same with detectorists who find Spanish reales on the beach. Show me some news articles where people are being punished. Never heard of that or them being required to pay the state 20%.

You quoted some laws, but I see no evidence of that being enforced along the Treasure Coast other than when someone is trying to night hawk an off shore wreck that the state has leased to someone else. Never heard anything about beach finds or even in knee deep water.
You are allowed to keep Spanish relics that you find on the beach, usually thrown there after storms, you violate the law when your recover the relics from the water. Under Florida law anything found in the water over 50 years old belongs to the State of Florida, It is Florida law.

It is covered under Florida State Laws of Antiquities and also by the federal law ARPA (Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979).
 

pulltabfelix

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You are allowed to keep Spanish relics that you find on the beach, usually thrown there after storms, you violate the law when your recover the relics from the water. Under Florida law anything found in the water over 50 years old belongs to the State of Florida, It is Florida law.

It is covered under Florida State Laws of Antiquities and also by the federal law ARPA (Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979).
I think you are streching the ARPA of 1979. I don't see where Florida Treasure coast beaches are of any concern to the federal government unless the indians own them all.

The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979, also referred to as ARPA, is a Federal law passed in 1979 and amended in 1988. It governs the excavation of archaeological sites on Federal and Indian lands in the United States, and the removal and disposition of archaeological collections from those sites.
 

pulltabfelix

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? ? ? Eleven what ?
I guess being on the west coast of FL you are not aware of the Treasure Coast on the East side of FL and that it refers to the 1715 fleet of 11 spanish ships filled with gold and silver treasures bound for Spain. One of the richest series of ship wrecks to be sunk at one time in a hurricane.
 

pulltabfelix

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Just so we are clear and concise on information about the State Of Florida laws on metal detecting and lease site laws...

First lets address Pulltab Felix's opinion about metal detecting in the water around lease sites... this is in fact not legal... and not because of the "leases".

Then... Lets share correct information about what and where metal detecting is and is not allowed... as to be correct when informing people on this site about metal detecting in Florida... as to properly guide and inform.

First... anyone planning on detecting in Florida should know this first and foremost...

It is against the law to recover anything in state waters more than 50 years old In Florida state waters which include all submerged bottom lands to include lakes, rivers and three miles out into the ocean on the East coast, nine miles out on the Gulf Coast, and twelve miles out from Key West.

Sovereign submerged lands are those natural or
historically submerged lands owned by the State
of Florida, either by right of statehood or by deed
or grants. They include tidal lands, islands, sandbars,
shallow banks, and lands water ward of the
ordinary or mean high water line, beneath navigable
fresh water or tidally influenced water.
http://www.mcatoolkit.org/pdf/Public...nds_Primer.pdf

http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/...EChapter%20267

http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/...n%2012#0253.12

http://www.flheritage.com/archaeolog...water/laws.cfm

Any person who by means of excavation either conducts archaeological field investigations on, or removes or attempts to remove, or defaces, destroys, or otherwise alters any archaeological site or specimen located upon, any land owned or controlled by the state or within the boundaries of a designated state archaeological landmark or landmark zone, except in the course of activities pursued under the authority of a permit or under procedures relating to accredited institutions granted by the division, commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084, and any vehicle or equipment of any person used in connection with the violation is subject to forfeiture to the state if it is determined by any court of law that the vehicle or equipment was involved in the violation. Such person shall forfeit to the state all specimens, objects, and materials collected or excavated, together with all photographs and records relating to such material. The court may also order the defendant to make restitution to the state for the archaeological or commercial value and cost of restoration and repair as defined in subsection (4).
http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/...13.HTM&Title=-
So what you are telling me everyone pulling US pennies older than 50 years out of the ankle deep ocean beach water in FL are breaking a FL law and could be arrested. That would make some interesting news. I am not disputing what you are saying about the law, but the law is unreasonable.
 
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Treasure_Hunter

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I think you are streching the ARPA of 1979. I don't see where Florida Treasure coast beaches are of any concern to the federal government unless the indians own them all.

The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979, also referred to as ARPA, is a Federal law passed in 1979 and amended in 1988. It governs the excavation of archaeological sites on Federal and Indian lands in the United States, and the removal and disposition of archaeological collections from those sites.
Please point out wherein the ARPA act of 1979 it states it applies only to Indian artifacts, you won't find it, it covers all artifacts over 100 years old on federal lands and Indian lands.

Florida law covers any treasure or object found in the waters in the state of Florida over 50 years of age, it is considered property of the state.

"The Florida Historical Resources Act covers all navigable bays, rivers, streams and lakes in the state and extends jurisdiction 10 miles out into the Gulf of Mexico and 3 miles offshore into the Atlantic Ocean. Divers must obtain permits from the state Division of Historical Resources before any excavation of an underwater discovery and they have to qualify as professional archaeological experts affiliated with a museum, university, or similar scientific or educational institution. Anything they find under the research permit is public property. Failure to obtain a permit is a third degree felony. Exploration and Recovery permits are required for individuals or companies who want to explore or recover artifacts on state-owned lands--including those underwater. All activities must be performed under state supervision, archaeological guidelines apply to any excavation and recovered artifacts are recorded and conserved. By law, a portion of the find may be awarded to the finder."
 
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Treasure_Hunter

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So what you are telling me everyone pulling US pennies older than 50 years out of the ankle deep ocean beach water in FL are breaking a FL law and could be arrested. That would make some interesting news. I am not disputing what you are saying about the law, but the law is unreasonable.
Technically yes, that is the law, the state want come after finders for it, they will when people take Spanish artifacts illegally. You are also not just taking the artifacts from the state, it is being stolen from the owners who paid millions for the leases.
 

ARC

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I guess being on the west coast of FL you are not aware of the Treasure Coast on the East side of FL and that it refers to the 1715 fleet of 11 spanish ships filled with gold and silver treasures bound for Spain. One of the richest series of ship wrecks to be sunk at one time in a hurricane.
lol.... :/..... heh
 

RTR

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i will be in the cocoa beach area for my Xmas holidays this year (22 days). Wondering if there are any pointers, tips for areas to check out with my son (trying to get him hooked on detecting). We have

Thinking about the Sebastian inlet/ampersands areas but really don’t know much about them.

Will be using a garret Atgold and a teknics 4000 (if that matters)

Any info/directions/tips/ would be greatly appreciated

Take care,

Ben
Theres a lot more than treasure on the treasure coast.Seems its a off shore dump site for shredded Alum. cans.
These pieces detected (on the beach) at Melbourne (just the 1st day).
But 2 days before I got there(Jan.2020)
693.JPG
539.JPG
some guy dug a Gold 1700s coin (on the beach).About 1/4 mile South of this Resort.
Good luck to ya :) !
 

pulltabfelix

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Technically yes, that is the law, the state want come after finders for it, they will when people take Spanish artifacts illegally. You are also not just taking the artifacts from the state, it is being stolen from the owners who paid millions for the leases.
I am not disputing the rights of the lease holders. in a previous post (you might have missed it) I specified the rules (as I have read them several years ago, there is a boundary around those wrecks of a certain radius of yards that you can not hunt. They ponied up large amounts of money for the exclusive rights to hunt those wrecks.

The original poster said this:

"i will be in the cocoa beach area for my Xmas holidays this year (22 days). Wondering if there are any pointers, tips for areas to check out with my son (trying to get him hooked on detecting). We have

Thinking about the Sebastian inlet/ampersands areas but really don’t know much about them.

Will be using a garret Atgold and a teknics 4000 (if that matters)

Any info/directions/tips/ would be greatly appreciated

I am trying to give him advice on his upcoming hunts."

However but a few posters come in and quote laws that will have him finding and keeping any coin over 50 years old, which precludes any US silver coins. I have seen more than a few videos and posts over the years of detectorists finding silver spanish coins on the treasure coast. Did they report them to the state? I doubt it. Probably 10x as many have found spanish coins over the years and don't post on forums or youtube.

Yes, it may be a florida law intended for the people infringing on lease rights or archeological sites on the beach and there are some of those on the Treasure coast. But there is no way the officials in FL can see what a detectorists is putting in his pouch among the beach junk he/she has collected.

Don't try to scare every detectorists visiting FL on their vacation from hunting the FL beaches. I have written two books of detecting the FL beaches. One specifically on the Treasure coast where the 1715 Spanish fleet sunk off shore and one hunting the Florida beaches on the West coast. A lot of research went into these books including talks with some very experienced local beach hunters. I purposely left out the FL law on finding 50 year old pennies (which probably don't survive that long in ocean salt water) because it did not apply to the average ocean beach hunter. The FL officials are more worried about dogs on the beaches than any metal detectorists. I have seen often officials chasing people off FL beaches with dogs, but never, every seen or even heard of a detectorist being stopped and having his finds pouch examined.

Let's get realistic in our advice to people wanting information on maybe metal detecting on their vacation to FL. After all, without the millions of people visiting and moving to FL each year, I would hate to think what your economy would be like. You are discussing a FL law that the vacationing metal detectorists will never be bothered with, ever.

Now you find a guy with a 40" suction dredge around a leased wreck site illegally, it might just catch the attention of the authorities not to mention the leaseholder of that wreck.
 

Treasure_Hunter

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I am not disputing the rights of the lease holders. in a previous post (you might have missed it) I specified the rules (as I have read them several years ago, there is a boundary around those wrecks of a certain radius of yards that you can not hunt. They ponied up large amounts of money for the exclusive rights to hunt those wrecks.

The original poster said this:

"i will be in the cocoa beach area for my Xmas holidays this year (22 days). Wondering if there are any pointers, tips for areas to check out with my son (trying to get him hooked on detecting). We have

Thinking about the Sebastian inlet/ampersands areas but really don’t know much about them.

Will be using a garret Atgold and a teknics 4000 (if that matters)

Any info/directions/tips/ would be greatly appreciated

I am trying to give him advice on his upcoming hunts."

However but a few posters come in and quote laws that will have him finding and keeping any coin over 50 years old, which precludes any US silver coins. I have seen more than a few videos and posts over the years of detectorists finding silver spanish coins on the treasure coast. Did they report them to the state? I doubt it. Probably 10x as many have found spanish coins over the years and don't post on forums or youtube.

Yes, it may be a florida law intended for the people infringing on lease rights or archeological sites on the beach and there are some of those on the Treasure coast. But there is no way the officials in FL can see what a detectorists is putting in his pouch among the beach junk he/she has collected.

Don't try to scare every detectorists visiting FL on their vacation from hunting the FL beaches. I have written two books of detecting the FL beaches. One specifically on the Treasure coast where the 1715 Spanish fleet sunk off shore and one hunting the Florida beaches on the West coast. A lot of research went into these books including talks with some very experienced local beach hunters. I purposely left out the FL law on finding 50 year old pennies (which probably don't survive that long in ocean salt water) because it did not apply to the average ocean beach hunter. The FL officials are more worried about dogs on the beaches than any metal detectorists. I have seen often officials chasing people off FL beaches with dogs, but never, every seen or even heard of a detectorist being stopped and having his finds pouch examined.

Let's get realistic in our advice to people wanting information on maybe metal detecting on their vacation to FL. After all, without the millions of people visiting and moving to FL each year, I would hate to think what your economy would be like. You are discussing a FL law that the vacationing metal detectorists will never be bothered with, ever.

Now you find a guy with a 40" suction dredge around a leased wreck site illegally, it might just catch the attention of the authorities not to mention the leaseholder of that wreck.
We are not talking about issues with hunting Cocoa Beach, there is no issue hunting in the waters in Florida on about 95% of our 663 miles of beaches that are open for metal detecting with no issues, the only time an issue comes into play is when someone hunts in the water on the Treasure Coast beaches where the treasure leases are and a couple of very small beaches that have restricted digging on the beach with shovels and large scoops. Of the 663 miles of beaches, there are about 30 miles off-limits by the state on the Treasure Coast.

The state does not care about someone finding old silver quarters, dimes, and silver dollars, they DO CARE about finding old Spanish Treasure in the water as do the leaseholders on the Treasure Coast as you are stealing from them, they are the only people who have the right to hunt in the waters there.

YOU CAN NOT LEGALLY HUNT IN THE WATER WITH A DETECTOR ON THE SITES OF THE TREASURE LEASES unless you are a leaseholder or contractor for one of the leaseholders. You can hunt from the toe of the dunes to the water line and keep what you find on the Treasure Coast, you're not breaking any laws and no one will bother you..

We are being realistic, we don't need to talk to detectorists here, ARC and I both live in the state of Florida we are very familiar with the laws on metal detecting on our beaches here. Just like you can not hunt in State Parks here unless they are on the coast and they allow metal detecting on the beach, it is the law.

Of the 110+ million tourists a year who visit Florida only a very tiny percentage of them metal detect, when you go to the beaches here and see someone detecting the beach 99% of them are Florida residents.

"Florida law follows federal law and expands upon it. The Florida Historical Resources Act covers all navigable bays, rivers, streams and lakes in the state and extends jurisdiction 10 miles out into the Gulf of Mexico and 3 miles offshore into the Atlantic Ocean. Divers must obtain permits from the state Division of Historical Resources before any excavation of an underwater discovery and they have to qualify as professional archaeological experts affiliated with a museum, university or similar scientific or educational institution. Anything they find under the research permit is public property. Failure to obtain a permit is a third degree felony. Exploration and Recovery permits are required for individuals or companies who want to explore or recover artifacts on state-owned lands--including those underwater. All activities must be performed under state supervision, archaeological guidelines apply to any excavation and recovered artifacts are recorded and conserved. By law, a portion of the find may be awarded to the finder."

Members also can not use TreasureNet to openly advocate for members to violate Florida's laws.
 
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