Sterling pocket watch and 14k ring.

artslinger

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bigcaddy64

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These were scored at the last sale of the day, today. The pocket watch is Sterling. Unfortunately, I cannot open the back to see the movement. Any and all help authenticating it would be appreciated, as always. Thank you.

Artslinger
With all the watches you end up finding, you need to invest in a set of case back knives to open up watches. Maybe even a set of jewelers screwdrivers and spring pin tool as well


i use mine often when replacing batteries and opening cases without damage. Definitely worth the investment if this is your hobby.
 

OP
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artslinger

artslinger

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I'm not mechanically inclined, so I leave that to the professionals. I took the watch yesterday to a jeweler friend at the mall, and he could not open it. He said that he believed that it was soldered shut. I'll be taking to a watchmaker later today.

artslinger
 

tamrock

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Cool old PW. My guess the workings would be a key wind Swiss bar movement similar to this.
 

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Red-Coat

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Nice old sterling case. The ‘W.G.H’ maker mark is for William George Hammon, a Coventry case-maker. There was no Assay Office in Coventry, so he used the nearest office in Birmingham. He registered his mark in February 1881 and the date letter ‘i’ is for 1883.

Under most circumstances, a piece of silver from this date should have a ‘duty mark’ (Queen Victoria’s head) to indicate that tax had been paid at time of assay. However, certain items were exempted from duty at various times and watch cases were exempted in 1798, so that’s why it’s missing from your case.

As with all pocket watches, the date for the case will not necessarily be the date for the movement.
 

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artslinger

artslinger

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Thank you to all. I sincerely do appreciate your time, feedback, and information. I really appreciate it.

artslinger
 

pepperj

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I'm not mechanically inclined, so I leave that to the professionals. I took the watch yesterday to a jeweler friend at the mall, and he could not open it. He said that he believed that it was soldered shut. I'll be taking to a watchmaker later today.

artslinger
Nice picking once again.
Here is the basics on opening up a pocket watch.
Something that folks should get to know a tad as it's a valuable tool in the box knowing if the case is gold/silver.

Pretty basic information and easy to follow instructions of 5 of the most popular watch styles.

 

Red-Coat

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Good luck getting it opened. Although the centre engraving and other details are different, it’s extremely similar in style to this fusee (which was in an 1884 hallmarked case). The only clues to the maker of the movement are that the inner case is numbered ‘21957’ and the dust cover is marked ‘57’ and ‘WC’.

Watch.jpg


 

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artslinger

artslinger

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Nice picking once again.
Here is the basics on opening up a pocket watch.
Something that folks should get to know a tad as it's a valuable tool in the box knowing if the case is gold/silver.

Pretty basic information and easy to follow instructions of 5 of the most popular watch styles.



Nice picking once again.
Here is the basics on opening up a pocket watch.
Something that folks should get to know a tad as it's a valuable tool in the box knowing if the case is gold/silver.

Pretty basic information and easy to follow instructions of 5 of the most popular watch styles.


Thank you very much! I appreciate it.

artslinger
 

OP
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artslinger

artslinger

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Jul 19, 2015
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Good luck getting it opened. Although the centre engraving and other details are different, it’s extremely similar in style to this fusee (which was in an 1884 hallmarked case). The only clues to the maker of the movement are that the inner case is numbered ‘21957’ and the dust cover is marked ‘57’ and ‘WC’.

View attachment 2118433

Thank you very much! I appreciate it. Sure looks very, very similar.

artslinger
 

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