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jeff of pa

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The Escanaba Daily Press​

Sat, Aug 08, 1953 ·Page 4
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Yep once again brilliant find.

I love these stories while for many may not seem interest because they are not famous well known treasure.

I see these stories having more legs than the famous ones.And some of these stories can become with more research a very real viable project.

These are the ones I like to have a dig into and see what happens searching for what we can prove to be facts.

Crow:icon_thumright:
 

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For example the name It is a rare French name and quite rare in States. It means veal stew in French However I did find a family by the that name. the only family by that name in the united states. They lived in Wayne Detroit in 1920. Alphonsoe Blanguette was born ion 1881 in France so there is very little evidence to support he was connected to the story. Maybe his father was? Nothing definite.

Crow
 

A little more on the history ofsite in question.

Today, Fayette’s wealth of cultural and natural resources offers a unique blend of Michigan history and scenery. Fayette has an abundance of surviving structures from the 19th-century industrial community that was built to smelt iron ore. The blast furnace, hotel, office, residences, town hall, machine shop and other structures offer a rare glimpse into the diverse community and its operations. The museum village is nestled in a harbor surrounded by white cliffs, green forests and blue Lake Michigan waters.

The advantageous natural resources are what led Fayette Brown, a manager of the Jackson Iron Company, to select the site and begin building the town in late 1860s. The harbor was essential for the transportation of people, supplies and iron ore. The limestone cliffs provided flux for the smelting process and construction materials. The surrounding forests provided charcoal to fuel the blast furnace.

Between 1867 and 1891, Fayette was a bustling, noisy and dirty industrial community. During that time, the primarily immigrant population of approximately 500 people produced nearly 230,000 tons of pig iron ingots at Fayette. Most of the iron produced at Fayette was shipped to steel producers on the lower Great Lakes and converted into railroad rails and steel for the growing nation.

The blast furnace and supporting structures like the machine shop were the lifeblood of the town, but it was also a somewhat isolated community with a range of business and activities. Fayette had a coronet band, baseball team, horse racing track, school, post office and company store. Amid the steam whistles, smoke and whirl of engines were noises of children playing, the clattering of horses and clinging silverware from the hotel’s dining room.

When the Jackson Iron Company ceased smelting operations in 1891, most workers and families moved to other towns. Some residents remained in the area, and the site became a local tourist destination. In 1959, the site was acquired by the State of Michigan. Since then, we have developed visitor facilities, stabilized the remaining structures and installed exhibits that interpret Fayette’s rich history.

So we can see operations was all over by 1891. So need to dig deeper if this alleged saloon existed.

Crow
 

Predates me!
I lived in Muskegon a dozen years.
No gold horde found by me though...
Other kids did better it seems. L.o.l..


[In Muskegon, Michigan, a group of youths stumbled upon an intriguing discovery: gold coins hidden within a tree stump. While this find is certainly captivating, it’s essential to consider the context and legality of such discoveries.]
 

Predates me!
I lived in Muskegon a dozen years.
No gold horde found by me though...
Other kids did better it seems. L.o.l..


[In Muskegon, Michigan, a group of youths stumbled upon an intriguing discovery: gold coins hidden within a tree stump. While this find is certainly captivating, it’s essential to consider the context and legality of such discoveries.]
What date did kids discover the gold coins? I wonder if there is connection to alleged Blanguette?

Crow
 

Its fair distance away from Fayette

Its is an amazing ghost town of 19th century iron foundry.

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Its amazing these days to see 19th century blast furnaces still so much in tacked.

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Here is sandy bay where this alleged money was hidden.

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In the small settlement there is still today a bar still exists now called the port bar . clearly built after 1880 but perhaps rebuilt on the site of the former Hole in the Wall Saloon. that was burnt down?

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port bar 3.JPG

The quest remains is there a hidden cache of coins hidden in Sandy bay?

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A legend or based on fact? I am not sure but if I was passing through I swing a detector along the beach.

Crow
 

What date did kids discover the gold coins? I wonder if there is connection to alleged Blanguette?

Crow

[Some residents of the Hill district may remember the story of gold. being found near Ryerson Creek nearly fifty years ago. It was a fact and was the result of a boy's stirring up a bonfire. In the 1890's, the creek spread out to form quite a pond above and below the old bridge at Wood Street. In winter it was a favorite place for skating, and the skaters built fires, using the many stumps along the banks that had been left after timber was cut off. On New Year's Eve, 1894, Willie Peterson, son of Christ Peterson, living at 55 Erickson Street, went out to skate, and in trying to get more glaze into a stump that had been set afire earlier,



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he took a stick and poked. under the stump and broke the edges. Some hard. round pieces of metal started rolling out, and he called to one of the boys standing by to see the "washers." The boy was a Carlson, 17 years old, and he saw that they were not washers, and started. picking them up, so young Peterson picked, too. They each had an equal amount. Mr. Peterson took the pieces his son found to the Union National Bank, where it was found that they were gold pieces. There had been 30, and they were $20 gold pieces. It was determined by C. T. Hills that the gold was part of a large amount that had been hidden by a man named Ted Boyce during Civil War times. The money found by the boys was covered with green mould. Mr. Hills had been executor for the Estate of Boyce for a time and had knowledge of his affairs.]

 

[Some residents of the Hill district may remember the story of gold. being found near Ryerson Creek nearly fifty years ago. It was a fact and was the result of a boy's stirring up a bonfire. In the 1890's, the creek spread out to form quite a pond above and below the old bridge at Wood Street. In winter it was a favorite place for skating, and the skaters built fires, using the many stumps along the banks that had been left after timber was cut off. On New Year's Eve, 1894, Willie Peterson, son of Christ Peterson, living at 55 Erickson Street, went out to skate, and in trying to get more glaze into a stump that had been set afire earlier,



*****

Page 11


he took a stick and poked. under the stump and broke the edges. Some hard. round pieces of metal started rolling out, and he called to one of the boys standing by to see the "washers." The boy was a Carlson, 17 years old, and he saw that they were not washers, and started. picking them up, so young Peterson picked, too. They each had an equal amount. Mr. Peterson took the pieces his son found to the Union National Bank, where it was found that they were gold pieces. There had been 30, and they were $20 gold pieces. It was determined by C. T. Hills that the gold was part of a large amount that had been hidden by a man named Ted Boyce during Civil War times. The money found by the boys was covered with green mould. Mr. Hills had been executor for the Estate of Boyce for a time and had knowledge of his affairs.]

Interesting story. Stories like these can end up being the money ticket.

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The Ryerson Creek area spans 72 acres and runs the entire length of Ryerson Creek. The space was formed naturally by the ravine/valley of Ryerson Creek. It is heavily wooded and consists of varying terrain, from lowland marsh to high-banked ravine. The area provides a ribbon of nature through a heavy residential and commercial portion of the City.

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From near the bridge a wood street

ryson creek.JPG

a pathway on the other side road next to thew bridge.

ryson creek 2.JPG

Still there maybe be further coin spills buried in soil around creek area?

130 dollars may more than the thirty coins found?

Crow
 

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