🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Unknown Iron

Irregular

Jr. Member
Mar 2, 2011
62
45
Virginia (Occupied)
This was uncovered in the excavation of a water line this week, its exact depth is unknown; the location of recovery is one with recorded history dating to the 1820s. The first thing to come to mind for me was perhaps a hide scraper, but I'm sure the possibilities extend far beyond that. The end opposite of the flattened blade seems to me to have the characteristics of once having been a handle, with a possible bolster.
I'm hoping a sage or two might chime in on this item. TIA in advance for any replies and assistance!
IMG_7821.JPG
IMG_7823.JPG
IMG_7824.JPG
 

bowwinkles

Bronze Member
Nov 3, 2012
1,915
2,160
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
irregular & sarge nailed it see example here
 
Upvote 0

GoldieLocks

Bronze Member
Dec 28, 2019
1,028
1,034
Nevada
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Could it have just been dropped into this hole more recently? It looks like an Asian wok mixing wooden or modern large wooden stirring spoon to me.
 
Upvote 0
OP
Irregular

Irregular

Jr. Member
Mar 2, 2011
62
45
Virginia (Occupied)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
Thanks for the replies, folks. The item has the characteristics of a sharp-edged tool; the scalpel-shaped business end has a spine that measures on average .09 inches in thickness that tapers to a .03 on the (interpreted) blade edge. The possibility that it once had a consistent edge-to-edge thickness (a la screwdriver) I guess can't be ruled out, but the odds of a resulting even taper in the process of corrosion seems unlikely. Also the ratio of handle-to-tool end thickness and lack of spooning doesn't reflect the possibility a tire iron or pry bar to me, and hand-forging is indicative of its age.

Thank you all again.
 
Upvote 0
OP
Irregular

Irregular

Jr. Member
Mar 2, 2011
62
45
Virginia (Occupied)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
Could it have just been dropped into this hole more recently? It looks like an Asian wok mixing wooden or modern large wooden stirring spoon to me.
Thank you GoldieLocks. This was brought to the surface in the laying of a three-foot deep trench for a water line, but I wasn't there at that moment so don't know it's depth of recovery. It's composition is iron.
 
Upvote 0

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top