Wagon Train Attacked by Indians (1858)

King Canslaw

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Nov 30, 2017
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This is where I get suspicious and have to ask a logistics question. When attacked by Indians, why further diminish your defensive power by tasking people to bury your gold and silver? If you win the battle, you still have it. If you lose the battle, it doesn't matter. Plus, the manpower needed to bury the gold and silver increases proportionally to how much gold and silver there is. And if the Indians are attacking in the desert near Las Vegas, wouldn't they see the people who are digging the hole for the gold and silver, kill them after the battle and investigate the hole?

I'm not saying it didn't happen. I just try to put myself in that situation and reason out what I would do. And with, "Don't get dead" being the primary rule I would either fight if I thought I could win, or cut the gold and silver loose and hightail it out of there if I thought I could get away. As a last resort you fight to the death if your chances are slim, but slightly better than escaping. The last thing I would do it lower my chances of winning or escaping even further by expending manpower to bury gold and silver.

One other thing to consider is what was the outcome of the Indian attack? If the Mormons won, chances are they did the Jen Psaki thing and circled back at some point to retrieve the cache. If the Mormons were wiped out and no one survived, there is still a chance the cache is still there if it existed and was buried. But if even one Mormon survived, we circle back to the circle back thing.
I lick your lojic hear. I donut wanna say this didnt not happen but you make alot, a hole lot of cents.
 

boogeyman

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We have no idea what happen or how the Mormons reacted, just a story handed down from generations. If I figure out the location of the attack, I'll leave no stone unturned and hit every natural landmark with the MD. Coming up short with internet searches related to this event, next step, scouring the massive 240,000 sqft public library in Salt Lake City.

As for the mob in Las Vegas, they didn't exist here in 1858.

I actually like that there is very little info regarding this attack, it make for betting odds finding something at the site. I would be thrilled to find ferrous artifacts as well.
Don't limit yourself to only area papers! You'd be amazed how much stuff isn't mentioned locally but turns up in San Francisco papers. (Hint hint)
 
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Rooster 777

Rooster 777

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ok I have been reading these posts, and now is the time for the truth. In the mid 90's, I read the same story. I am a professional treasure FINDER from Fla. and the Caribbean. I lived in LV at the time, and decided to look this up. I traced the story to the Red Rock Canyon area west of LV.
I found the burned wagons in the desert slightly west of the canyon. I searched the area with no other find. BUT, I told a neighbor about the story, and guest what? He told me that a lady friend of his found a gold Mormon coin very near to where i found the wagons. That area is now a park.
I've been on vacation and just now seeing these additional posts. I live at the mouth of Red Rock Canyon, there would be no reason for a wagon train to enter Red Rock as its essentially a cul-de-sac in this valley. If the wagon train was on their way to Southern California, that would clearly be a waste of time.
 

MiddenMonster

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You are probably referring to Ice Box Canyon which is in Red Rock. It's a difficult hike through a narrow canyon, it doesn't get much light which keeps it cool, hence it's name.
Actually I was thinking about the term "box canyon" in the general sense, based on your use of the term cul-de-sac. I remember reading about a plane crash back in the 1970's that killed a college sports team after flying into a box canyon and smacking into the side of a mountain when they lost room to navigate. The canyon you describe sounds like a similar setup to the plane crash situation, which would mean that if the Mormons did go into Red Rock Canyon they made a serious tactical error.
 
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Rooster 777

Rooster 777

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Actually I was thinking about the term "box canyon" in the general sense, based on your use of the term cul-de-sac. I remember reading about a plane crash back in the 1970's that killed a college sports team after flying into a box canyon and smacking into the side of a mountain when they lost room to navigate. The canyon you describe sounds like a similar setup to the plane crash situation, which would mean that if the Mormons did go into Red Rock Canyon they made a serious tactical error.
If you knew this valley the way I do, you would understand how difficult it would be to make that type of navigational error. If you are traveling from Utah, heading to Southern California, you would be moving from North to South at the lowest part of the valley, this would be close to where the Las Vegas strip is located today. Red Rock Canyon is at the Western rim of this valley at a much higher elevation with 8,000 ft mountains at the back of the canyon, it would be like running into a wall. I also find it hard to believe that a wagon train, in 1858 could even make it into Red Rock canyon. That guys story makes zero sense to me.
 

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