A little painted/Snapper

pepperj

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It's that time of the year again the turtles are on the move to lay the nests of eggs.
A little painted along the driveway.
And a larger Snapping turtle that can get up and do some trucking when it wants.
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traveller777

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pepperj

pepperj

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I was wrong, pepper. I asked my cousin Bubba "Three Fingers" Thomas and he said Snapping Turtles like to be tickled under their chin. Try that
I know how they can leave marks on a stick.
Long leather gloves and no hugs. Darn that one that pissed on my shoe.🤣
Just helping it off the road, that's gratitude for ya.
 
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pepperj

pepperj

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Its crazy to think that snapper could be as old as i am....11 to 45 years lifespan in wild
Got some good/bad news-it might very well out live you also.

What is the life cycle of a snapping turtle?​

  • The incubation period lasts for 100 – 140 days. The average lifespan of snapping turtles is about 80 – 120 years in the wild even though some are expected to live 200 years. The age in captivity is 20 – 70 years.

Do common snapping turtles lay eggs?​

  • Like many turtles, common snapping turtles develop slowly. They are sexually mature in about 5-7 years, and live about 30 years. In captivity, this species can live much longer. Breeding occurs in both spring and fall. Females will lay 25-50 eggs, 60-100% of which may be eaten by other animals.
 

traveller777

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Got some good/bad news-it might very well out live you also.

What is the life cycle of a snapping turtle?​

  • The incubation period lasts for 100 – 140 days. The average lifespan of snapping turtles is about 80 – 120 years in the wild even though some are expected to live 200 years. The age in captivity is 20 – 70 years.

Do common snapping turtles lay eggs?​

  • Like many turtles, common snapping turtles develop slowly. They are sexually mature in about 5-7 years, and live about 30 years. In captivity, this species can live much longer. Breeding occurs in both spring and fall. Females will lay 25-50 eggs, 60-100% of which may be eaten by other animals.
Thanks for information. Interesting.
 
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pepperj

pepperj

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Thanks for information. Interesting.
Saw one a few years ago along the highway beside the guard rail. Size of a kitchen table top.
I did a U turn went back put the 4 ways on, but it had been hit already.
Didn't make my day, sad $hit when that happens.
Popper's deserve a beating, seriously I'd probably go street on an idiot if I caught them in the act.
 

traveller777

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Saw one a few years ago along the highway beside the guard rail. Size of a kitchen table top.
I did a U turn went back put the 4 ways on, but it had been hit already.
Didn't make my day, sad $hit when that happens.
Popper's deserve a beating, seriously I'd probably go street on an idiot if I caught them in the act.
Likely was well over a hundred years old and for no good reason was killed
 
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pepperj

pepperj

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Just found this gal on the edge of the strawberry row.
850ft from the nearest water source. Through a bush and a steep incline up from the bay. The two options are 1200 ft away.
At least it will be safe in the berry patch.
 

traveller777

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Just found this gal on the edge of the strawberry row.
850ft from the nearest water source. Through a bush and a steep incline up from the bay. The two options are 1200 ft away.
At least it will be safe in the berry patch.
Is this a different one pepper? No picture.
 
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pepperj

pepperj

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Next time put your hand down beside him for comparison.

Nice pictures, pepper. Thanks for sharing.
Though you are one of the esteemed colleagues of the University of Backwoods.
How do know how big is my mitt?
 

crashbandicoot

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Though you are one of the esteemed colleagues of the University of Backwoods.
How do know how big is my mitt?
I,ve seen several Snappers the size of a No.3 washtub. I was sitting real quiet one evening on the bank of an old Cypress Brake and had one surface right in front of me,big old sucker.He kind of hung there a few and quietly submerged back into the deeps.Wish I,d had digital cameras back then. Almost ran over one with my boat too. Thought it was a stump until I remembered there wasn,t any stumps around there,Circled back and it was a huge snapper. When they get up on their legs they can move out.
 

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