A more realistic creek hunt. Cool engraved clock plate .

RatherBeDigging

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Some stuff out of a few waterways. Key and clock plate and fish are from a mile up stream from where all the silver bars came from. Blue and white was found at bar site. Lock is from local creek. Anyone know age? Only has a letter R and 16 on back. Clock plate was a pull tab signal. Says __ kaller no jewels no adjustments Germany. This was much more the normal shallow water hunt for me. Waiting for bar site to flood again though.
 
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Red-Coat

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Can't help on the other items, but I think you’ll find your timepiece movement plate says “Th. E. Haller”, which is for Thomas Ernst Haller AG. Some “Haller” timepieces appear on sites like eBay, said to be “Kaller” by sellers who confuse the ornate script letter “H” for a “K”. There’s further confusion because there were multiple “Haller” clock and watch makers in Germany, of which two were “Thomas Haller”. Surely from the size, this is from a pocket watch, not a clock?

The Thomas Ernst Haller company was founded in Schwenningen in 1902 and taken over by Kienzle in 1928, mainly to acquire their expertise in watch movements. Although they may still have been using the “Th. E. Haller” mark in 1929, they stopped production of wall and table clocks with the onset of the Great Depression in 1929/30. After that they only made pocket watches, but no longer with the Haller mark on the movements.


[[[Incidentally, the use of the word “Germany” in English as an origin on any item usually implies manufacture before Germany became divided into two countries after the end of WWII in 1949 (or after reunification in 1990). I have however seen clocks which say “W. Germany” on the dial face (ie 1949 - 1990) but which still just say “Germany” on the movement.]]]
 
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Digger RJ

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View attachment 1985067 View attachment 1985068
Some stuff out of a few waterways. Key and clock plate and fish are from a mile up stream from where all the silver bars came from. Blue and white was found at bar site. Lock is from local creek. Anyone know age? Only has a letter R and 16 on back. Clock plate was a pull tab signal. Says __ kaller no jewels no adjustments Germany. This was much more the normal shallow water hunt for me. Waiting for bar site to flood again though.
Nice!!! Congrats!!!
 
OP
R

RatherBeDigging

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Jun 16, 2020
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Can't help on the other items, but I think you’ll find your timepiece movement plate says “Th. E. Haller”, which is for Thomas Ernst Haller AG. Some “Haller” timepieces appear on sites like eBay, said to be “Kaller” by sellers who confuse the ornate script letter “H” for a “K”. There’s further confusion because there were multiple “Haller” clock and watch makers in Germany, of which two were “Thomas Haller”. Surely from the size, this is from a pocket watch, not a clock?

The Thomas Ernst Haller company was found in Schwenningen in 1902 and taken over by Kienzle in 1928, mainly to acquire their expertise in watch movements. Although they may still have been using the “Th. E. Haller” mark in 1929, they stopped production of wall and table clocks with the onset of the Great Depression in 1929/30. After that they only made pocket watches, but no longer with the Haller mark on the movements.


[[[Incidentally, the use of the word “Germany” in English as an origin on any item usually implies manufacture before Germany became divided into two countries after the end of WWII in 1949 (or after reunification in 1990). I have however seen clocks which say “W. Germany” on the dial face (ie 1949 - 1990) but which still just say “Germany” on the movement.]]]
Thanks for the help. Have a hard time reading script some times. Looks like this is from their meta moment watch. Only one I could find was a ww1 style trench watch that used this movement. Engraving matches mine. Pocket watch turned so crown was at 3. Loops added for a band.
 
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billb

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View attachment 1985067 View attachment 1985068
Some stuff out of a few waterways. Key and clock plate and fish are from a mile up stream from where all the silver bars came from. Blue and white was found at bar site. Lock is from local creek. Anyone know age? Only has a letter R and 16 on back. Clock plate was a pull tab signal. Says __ kaller no jewels no adjustments Germany. This was much more the normal shallow water hunt for me. Waiting for bar site to flood again though.
Can't help on the other items, but I think you’ll find your timepiece movement plate says “Th. E. Haller”, which is for Thomas Ernst Haller AG. Some “Haller” timepieces appear on sites like eBay, said to be “Kaller” by sellers who confuse the ornate script letter “H” for a “K”. There’s further confusion because there were multiple “Haller” clock and watch makers in Germany, of which two were “Thomas Haller”. Surely from the size, this is from a pocket watch, not a clock?

The Thomas Ernst Haller company was founded in Schwenningen in 1902 and taken over by Kienzle in 1928, mainly to acquire their expertise in watch movements. Although they may still have been using the “Th. E. Haller” mark in 1929, they stopped production of wall and table clocks with the onset of the Great Depression in 1929/30. After that they only made pocket watches, but no longer with the Haller mark on the movements.


[[[Incidentally, the use of the word “Germany” in English as an origin on any item usually implies manufacture before Germany became divided into two countries after the end of WWII in 1949 (or after reunification in 1990). I have however seen clocks which say “W. Germany” on the dial face (ie 1949 - 1990) but which still just say “Germany” on the movement.]]]
Can't help on the other items, but I think you’ll find your timepiece movement plate says “Th. E. Haller”, which is for Thomas Ernst Haller AG. Some “Haller” timepieces appear on sites like eBay, said to be “Kaller” by sellers who confuse the ornate script letter “H” for a “K”. There’s further confusion because there were multiple “Haller” clock and watch makers in Germany, of which two were “Thomas Haller”. Surely from the size, this is from a pocket watch, not a clock?

The Thomas Ernst Haller company was founded in Schwenningen in 1902 and taken over by Kienzle in 1928, mainly to acquire their expertise in watch movements. Although they may still have been using the “Th. E. Haller” mark in 1929, they stopped production of wall and table clocks with the onset of the Great Depression in 1929/30. After that they only made pocket watches, but no longer with the Haller mark on the movements.


[[[Incidentally, the use of the word “Germany” in English as an origin on any item usually implies manufacture before Germany became divided into two countries after the end of WWII in 1949 (or after reunification in 1990). I have however seen clocks which say “W. Germany” on the dial face (ie 1949 - 1990) but which still just say “Germany” on the movement.]]]
 

billb

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Congratulations on your nice relics and great information indeed
 

Hunk-a-lead

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View attachment 1985067 View attachment 1985068
Some stuff out of a few waterways. Key and clock plate and fish are from a mile up stream from where all the silver bars came from. Blue and white was found at bar site. Lock is from local creek. Anyone know age? Only has a letter R and 16 on back. Clock plate was a pull tab signal. Says __ kaller no jewels no adjustments Germany. This was much more the normal shallow water hunt for me. Waiting for bar site to flood again though.
great finds anyway, you have set the bar pretty high
 

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