A New Type for Me...Steubenville?

Hutch in PA

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Nov 18, 2010
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The attached point came out of a new spot for me...so I have nothing from the site to compare it to. However, it's within a few miles of my regular stops, which depending on the exact location, have yielded pieces ranging from Archaic to Woodland.

I found this one on Sunday morning, and it is unlike anything else in my personal find collection. Perhaps its just 'run of the mill' but even so, I've found enough artifacts to know it is 'unique' to me. It is 1.75 inches long and 1 inch wide. The base is heavily ground and slightly concave. Of course, there is no flute! It has fine serrations around. The only thing I can find in any of my Pennsylvania region books is a Steubenville...though they don't reference my exact county.

I'd be interested in hearing opinions. As I said, I've found a few hundred points within a ten miles radius, and none are similar...???
 

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flintmel

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not sureon type Hutch but it's a nice one! Glad to hear you're finding artifacts..
 

old digger

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Nice find! With the front part rounded so, I would suggest maybe part of a nice knife?
 

Wallhangers

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Nice one Hutch, BTW, I responded to your pm.
 

creek astronaut

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Feb 16, 2009
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only book i have seen it typed in is a overstreet guide,imo overstreet isnt worth a poop.but in overstreets guide the stuebenville has shoulders and a stem,looks like what i would call a transitional point.the piece in question here doesnt have shoulders unless im not seeing something.
 

OP
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Hutch in PA

Hutch in PA

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Nov 18, 2010
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Western PA
I typed using Folgelman's Point Typology for Pennsylvania...Stuebenville was a close as I could come. As I said though, I'm open to suggestion. Mystery Point 6 4-15-12.jpg
 

dognose

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Possibly an agate basin. While scarce in the midwest, I have found two over the years. One was slender in width, only two inches in length and ground base and sides. The other wider and shorter. Are the sides also ground?

The grinding on my specimens are close to the area where the rounding of the point tip starts

indiana_agate_basin_1.jpg


indiana_agate_basin_2.jpg

I think the dimensions of these, esp the first, would be consistent with your find.
 

redbeardrelics

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That is a nice piece by whatever name we call it. I usually consider Steubenville and Fox Creek points to be one and the same, with Steubenville being the older name now pretty much superseded by Fox Creek. It may be an un-shouldered Fox Creek/Steubenville, but made of that material, with the heavy basal grinding, and no apparent shoulders I would suggest it is more of an un-typed knife blade, probably older than the Fox Creeks'. It is probably not an unfinished preform due to the basal grinding and finer edge work. Hopefully you can find many more items from that site to possibly help with this identification.

PS. I just realized this is an old post. time for more coffee...
 

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Charl

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Jan 19, 2012
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Bear in mind that, for much of the Northeast, the types known as Steubenville Lanceolate, and the related Steubenville Stemmed, received a name change years ago to Fox Creek Lancelolate, and Fox Creek Stemmed.

Here is Ritchie's description of the Steubenville Lanceolate. Be sure to click on the link at this link that will allow you to see many examples. Again, these are now known as Fox Creek Lanceolate. When first known only from surface finds, Steubenvilles were suggested to be Paleo, but now known to be Middle Woodland. Not saying that is what you have, but wanted to offer those clarifications, and this link to Ritchie's typology:

New York State Museum - Projectile Point Type Collection
 

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