Arrowheads, tools and such

shawnwa

Greenie
Jun 10, 2023
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Some artifacts that were collected on the California coast. Would love to hear your thoughts. And yes, I know some of them are crooked in display box ha
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Blackfoot58

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Jan 11, 2023
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Shawnwa. Some nice pieces there. Tell me, is there anything in the photo that has been recently made? Just asking. I see a couple that make me wonder. I do like what you are showing. I feel like an item or two aren’t actually very old though. Nuf sed. Thanks for sharing
 

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shawnwa

Greenie
Jun 10, 2023
19
37
these were all found around the same area in what i gather to be something like a native american garbage heap. big ''mounds'' you could say, of discarded weapons, tools, jewelry, etc, found in giant mounds of sand/dirt with tons of chips from making them. i hear they would go to the coast to make them, then head to the mountains for winter. so unless someone recently made them there, which is entirely possible, id say everything here is authentic. thanks for checking them out! i must add, im no expert. which is why im looking for this type of question
 

Blackfoot58

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Jan 11, 2023
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these were all found around the same area in what i gather to be something like a native american garbage heap. big ''mounds'' you could say, of discarded weapons, tools, jewelry, etc, found in giant mounds of sand/dirt with tons of chips from making them. i hear they would go to the coast to make them, then head to the mountains for winter. so unless someone recently made them there, which is entirely possible, id say everything here is authentic. thanks for checking them out! i must add, im no expert. which is why im looking for this type of question
Believe me, I’m not accusing. I just thought one in particular didn’t belong. That isn’t saying you did anything. This Week I found some debitage and a Presto glass jar liner. Obviously it wasn’t made by NA people. Thanks again for posting. You have some great stuff there.
 

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shawnwa

Greenie
Jun 10, 2023
19
37
funny you say that, i too came across a jar lid liner the other day.. it was my first post and the reason i started using this site, to look for any possible info about it. it has a printing error, which i imagine wasnt all that rare back then
 

ToddsPoint

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Mar 2, 2018
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Archaeologist Warren Moorhead wrote in his book “Stone Age in N. America” that those double beveled points were called “rotary spears”. He also thought they were made to spin in the air. Actually they are shaped like that due to the way they were resharpened. A beveled blade is made like that for skinning game. The angled edge helps when removing the skin. There’s no way something that heavy would spin when thrown.
 

releventchair

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Archaeologist Warren Moorhead wrote in his book “Stone Age in N. America” that those double beveled points were called “rotary spears”. He also thought they were made to spin in the air. Actually they are shaped like that due to the way they were resharpened. A beveled blade is made like that for skinning game. The angled edge helps when removing the skin. There’s no way something that heavy would spin when thrown.
Spinning the shaft by creating rotating drag (resistance to flight/air) would be better done by fletching on the rear of a shaft.

We've tried varied ways to stabilize. And it's interesting that creating drag isn't as hard as well fletched arrows we see or have used. (Though the art is certainly appreciated).
Just securing the front and rear of a feather on an atlatl dart improves drag compared to a bare shaft. Didn't even flatten some.

Modern archery stresses same side wing feathers. And how vanes are secured matters in shaft rotation. Maybe someone else sees it different , but I'd weep if tasked with determining (or worse creating by design) number of turns in a given distance.

The cutting end of a game head needs to slice and cause hemorrhage if an edged head design is the goal..
A misplaced mishap striking hard bone will test design and material. But stabbing with a knife into soft material makes more sense. A double lunged critter and the arrow/shaft and cutting head has done it's job. Outside of needing to break or deflect off a rib on entry maybe , it doesn't take much to poke a fatal lung or other vital damaging hole.
But crafting a cutting head with art (regional school or era or traveled ) and balance applied is not going to hurt.

Rotation? Possible steering from the rear. How controlled is debatable.
Front of center (weight balance deliberateness) of a completed arrow or shaft would concern me more.

 

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shawnwa

Greenie
Jun 10, 2023
19
37
Those are all nice and is the clear one a point or a crystal? A close up pic of that one would be appreciated.
Those are all nice and is the clear one a point or a crystal? A close up pic of that one would be appreciated.
Thanks man, I’m gna say that it is both a point and a crystal
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shawnwa

Greenie
Jun 10, 2023
19
37
Spinning the shaft by creating rotating drag (resistance to flight/air) would be better done by fletching on the rear of a shaft.

We've tried varied ways to stabilize. And it's interesting that creating drag isn't as hard as well fletched arrows we see or have used. (Though the art is certainly appreciated).
Just securing the front and rear of a feather on an atlatl dart improves drag compared to a bare shaft. Didn't even flatten some.

Modern archery stresses same side wing feathers. And how vanes are secured matters in shaft rotation. Maybe someone else sees it different , but I'd weep if tasked with determining (or worse creating by design) number of turns in a given distance.

The cutting end of a game head needs to slice and cause hemorrhage if an edged head design is the goal..
A misplaced mishap striking hard bone will test design and material. But stabbing with a knife into soft material makes more sense. A double lunged critter and the arrow/shaft and cutting head has done it's job. Outside of needing to break or deflect off a rib on entry maybe , it doesn't take much to poke a fatal lung or other vital damaging hole.
But crafting a cutting head with art (regional school or era or traveled ) and balance applied is not going to hurt.

Rotation? Possible steering from the rear. How controlled is debatable.
Front of center (weight balance deliberateness) of a completed arrow or shaft would concern me more.

Wow, yes this makes a lot of sense. Thanks a bunch for the info! Much appreciated
 

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