Finally, a few items worth posting!

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,346
26,141
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
After 4 previous hunts, I finally found a few things yesterday worth showing everyone. :thumbsup: This site just came available to me on May 1, so I detected it yesterday for about 4hrs before the rain moved in. A few interesting items popped up; the first find was 1816 Wellington Halfpenny. This coin is very thin and the details area not clear, obviously a copy made sometime in the 1820s or 30s. The porcelain doll heads and the bronze ‘Ministry of Housing Ontario’ plate were eyeball finds I found discarded under the back porch. I also found a couple of one-piece tombac buttons, a 1940 George Penny and few modern pennies. Something I found interesting about this site, was that the original horse stable was still being used, but as a garage for a car. The stable still had the feed trough and a spot where the horse would’ve been tied up. :o

I’m going to head back here again next weekend before the grass gets too tall to get the coil close to the ground.
Hope everyone has a great week!
Dave

Wellington Half Penny Token ‘Montreal’ 1816
Lower Canada (what is now Quebec) had the greatest number and variety of tokens in circulation. The Wellington tokens, a series of halfpenny and penny tokens with a bust of the Duke of Wellington, appeared in about 1814. They were popular, and many varieties were issued locally after 1825. In 1825, a halfpenny of Irish design was imported; its popularity resulted in its being imitated in brass, copies of which are very plentiful. In 1832, an anonymous halfpenny of English design appeared and was extensively imitated in brass. Counterfeits of worn-out English and Irish George III coppers also circulated in large numbers. These counterfeits were called “blacksmith tokens” as they were popularly believed to have been struck by a Montreal blacksmith to pay for his drink. This period ended in 1835, when the banks refused to accept such nondescript copper, except by weight. Upper Canada (what is now Ontario) first used local tokens after 1812, when a series of lightweight halfpennies was issued in memory of Sir Isaac Brock. These were superseded after 1825 by a series of tokens with a sloop on one side and various designs (e.g., plow, keg, crossed shovels over an anvil) on the other. In 1822, Lesslie & Sons issued a copper Two Penny token. The firm also issued halfpennies from 1824 to 1830.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Ontario)
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is the ministry of the Government of Ontario that is responsible for municipal affairs and housing in the Canadian province of Ontario. The Department of Municipal Affairs was established in 1934 by the Department of Municipal Affairs Act, which was passed in 1935. It inherited the municipal administrative and regulatory functions which had briefly been the responsibility of the Ontario Municipal Board. Initially, it was responsible for supervising the affairs of the municipalities whose real property tax-revenue base had collapsed during the Depression. After The Second World War, it became more involved in the provision of administrative and financial advice and support to municipalities. In April 1972, the department was dissolved, with most of its functions being transferred to the newly created Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Inter-governmental Affairs, but with the assessment function being given to the Ministry of Revenue. In 1973, the Ministry of Housing was established by The Ministry of Housing Act, inheriting the Plans Administration Branch from the Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Intergovernmental Affairs, as well as the Ontario Housing Corporation from the Ministry of Revenue.
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Upvote 45

Florida Finder

Bronze Member
Dec 17, 2020
1,100
2,954
Southern States of America
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
AT Max
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
After 4 previous hunts, I finally found a few things yesterday worth showing everyone. :thumbsup: This site just came available to me on May 1, so I detected it yesterday for about 4hrs before the rain moved in. A few interesting items popped up; the first find was 1816 Wellington Halfpenny. This coin is very thin and the details area not clear, obviously a copy made sometime in the 1820s or 30s. The porcelain doll heads and the bronze ‘Ministry of Housing Ontario’ plate were eyeball finds I found discarded under the back porch. I also found a couple of one-piece tombac buttons, a 1940 George Penny and few modern pennies. Something I found interesting about this site, was that the original horse stable was still being used, but as a garage for a car. The stable still had the feed trough and a spot where the horse would’ve been tied up. :o

I’m going to head back here again next weekend before the grass gets too tall to get the coil close to the ground.
Hope everyone has a great week!
Dave

Wellington Half Penny Token ‘Montreal’ 1816
Lower Canada (what is now Quebec) had the greatest number and variety of tokens in circulation. The Wellington tokens, a series of halfpenny and penny tokens with a bust of the Duke of Wellington, appeared in about 1814. They were popular, and many varieties were issued locally after 1825. In 1825, a halfpenny of Irish design was imported; its popularity resulted in its being imitated in brass, copies of which are very plentiful. In 1832, an anonymous halfpenny of English design appeared and was extensively imitated in brass. Counterfeits of worn-out English and Irish George III coppers also circulated in large numbers. These counterfeits were called “blacksmith tokens” as they were popularly believed to have been struck by a Montreal blacksmith to pay for his drink. This period ended in 1835, when the banks refused to accept such nondescript copper, except by weight. Upper Canada (what is now Ontario) first used local tokens after 1812, when a series of lightweight halfpennies was issued in memory of Sir Isaac Brock. These were superseded after 1825 by a series of tokens with a sloop on one side and various designs (e.g., plow, keg, crossed shovels over an anvil) on the other. In 1822, Lesslie & Sons issued a copper Two Penny token. The firm also issued halfpennies from 1824 to 1830.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Ontario)
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is the ministry of the Government of Ontario that is responsible for municipal affairs and housing in the Canadian province of Ontario. The Department of Municipal Affairs was established in 1934 by the Department of Municipal Affairs Act, which was passed in 1935. It inherited the municipal administrative and regulatory functions which had briefly been the responsibility of the Ontario Municipal Board. Initially, it was responsible for supervising the affairs of the municipalities whose real property tax-revenue base had collapsed during the Depression. After The Second World War, it became more involved in the provision of administrative and financial advice and support to municipalities. In April 1972, the department was dissolved, with most of its functions being transferred to the newly created Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Inter-governmental Affairs, but with the assessment function being given to the Ministry of Revenue. In 1973, the Ministry of Housing was established by The Ministry of Housing Act, inheriting the Plans Administration Branch from the Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Intergovernmental Affairs, as well as the Ontario Housing Corporation from the Ministry of Revenue.
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Congratulations on your finds! Glad the weather up there is cooperating.
 
OP
ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,346
26,141
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Congratulations on your finds! Glad the weather up there is cooperating.
Thanks for your post FF, hope things aren't too hot for you in Florida these days. The ground has finally thawed up here, but the farm fields are still a sloppy mess. :laughing7:
Best of luck to you,
Dave
 

Gare

Silver Member
Dec 30, 2012
3,224
6,207
Canton Ohio Area
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Presently using Deus's have Minelabs, Nokta's Tesoro's Have them all . Have WAY to many need to get rid of some
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Looks like you had to do a lot of digging. Nice finds and thanks for sharing
 

Coinstar magnet

Bronze Member
Apr 5, 2020
1,254
1,894
Northwest
Detector(s) used
Tesoro compadre, which can find needles, but looking for something with a bigger coil/detects deeper, waterproof salt/fresh user friendly.
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
After 4 previous hunts, I finally found a few things yesterday worth showing everyone. :thumbsup: This site just came available to me on May 1, so I detected it yesterday for about 4hrs before the rain moved in. A few interesting items popped up; the first find was 1816 Wellington Halfpenny. This coin is very thin and the details area not clear, obviously a copy made sometime in the 1820s or 30s. The porcelain doll heads and the bronze ‘Ministry of Housing Ontario’ plate were eyeball finds I found discarded under the back porch. I also found a couple of one-piece tombac buttons, a 1940 George Penny and few modern pennies. Something I found interesting about this site, was that the original horse stable was still being used, but as a garage for a car. The stable still had the feed trough and a spot where the horse would’ve been tied up. :o

I’m going to head back here again next weekend before the grass gets too tall to get the coil close to the ground.
Hope everyone has a great week!
Dave

Wellington Half Penny Token ‘Montreal’ 1816
Lower Canada (what is now Quebec) had the greatest number and variety of tokens in circulation. The Wellington tokens, a series of halfpenny and penny tokens with a bust of the Duke of Wellington, appeared in about 1814. They were popular, and many varieties were issued locally after 1825. In 1825, a halfpenny of Irish design was imported; its popularity resulted in its being imitated in brass, copies of which are very plentiful. In 1832, an anonymous halfpenny of English design appeared and was extensively imitated in brass. Counterfeits of worn-out English and Irish George III coppers also circulated in large numbers. These counterfeits were called “blacksmith tokens” as they were popularly believed to have been struck by a Montreal blacksmith to pay for his drink. This period ended in 1835, when the banks refused to accept such nondescript copper, except by weight. Upper Canada (what is now Ontario) first used local tokens after 1812, when a series of lightweight halfpennies was issued in memory of Sir Isaac Brock. These were superseded after 1825 by a series of tokens with a sloop on one side and various designs (e.g., plow, keg, crossed shovels over an anvil) on the other. In 1822, Lesslie & Sons issued a copper Two Penny token. The firm also issued halfpennies from 1824 to 1830.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Ontario)
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is the ministry of the Government of Ontario that is responsible for municipal affairs and housing in the Canadian province of Ontario. The Department of Municipal Affairs was established in 1934 by the Department of Municipal Affairs Act, which was passed in 1935. It inherited the municipal administrative and regulatory functions which had briefly been the responsibility of the Ontario Municipal Board. Initially, it was responsible for supervising the affairs of the municipalities whose real property tax-revenue base had collapsed during the Depression. After The Second World War, it became more involved in the provision of administrative and financial advice and support to municipalities. In April 1972, the department was dissolved, with most of its functions being transferred to the newly created Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Inter-governmental Affairs, but with the assessment function being given to the Ministry of Revenue. In 1973, the Ministry of Housing was established by The Ministry of Housing Act, inheriting the Plans Administration Branch from the Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Intergovernmental Affairs, as well as the Ontario Housing Corporation from the Ministry of Revenue.
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I'm curious as to the dates on the doll head finds... those are alittle creepy but cool....great post!
 

Hunk-a-lead

Bronze Member
Dec 20, 2020
1,631
2,240
Kansas City
Detector(s) used
Nokta Macro Legend, Simplex, Garrett Carrot, Predator Phoenix Shovel, Whites's hand digger, Gray Ghost pouch, Husky kneepads, any gloves I can find.......
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
After 4 previous hunts, I finally found a few things yesterday worth showing everyone. :thumbsup: This site just came available to me on May 1, so I detected it yesterday for about 4hrs before the rain moved in. A few interesting items popped up; the first find was 1816 Wellington Halfpenny. This coin is very thin and the details area not clear, obviously a copy made sometime in the 1820s or 30s. The porcelain doll heads and the bronze ‘Ministry of Housing Ontario’ plate were eyeball finds I found discarded under the back porch. I also found a couple of one-piece tombac buttons, a 1940 George Penny and few modern pennies. Something I found interesting about this site, was that the original horse stable was still being used, but as a garage for a car. The stable still had the feed trough and a spot where the horse would’ve been tied up. :o

I’m going to head back here again next weekend before the grass gets too tall to get the coil close to the ground.
Hope everyone has a great week!
Dave

Wellington Half Penny Token ‘Montreal’ 1816
Lower Canada (what is now Quebec) had the greatest number and variety of tokens in circulation. The Wellington tokens, a series of halfpenny and penny tokens with a bust of the Duke of Wellington, appeared in about 1814. They were popular, and many varieties were issued locally after 1825. In 1825, a halfpenny of Irish design was imported; its popularity resulted in its being imitated in brass, copies of which are very plentiful. In 1832, an anonymous halfpenny of English design appeared and was extensively imitated in brass. Counterfeits of worn-out English and Irish George III coppers also circulated in large numbers. These counterfeits were called “blacksmith tokens” as they were popularly believed to have been struck by a Montreal blacksmith to pay for his drink. This period ended in 1835, when the banks refused to accept such nondescript copper, except by weight. Upper Canada (what is now Ontario) first used local tokens after 1812, when a series of lightweight halfpennies was issued in memory of Sir Isaac Brock. These were superseded after 1825 by a series of tokens with a sloop on one side and various designs (e.g., plow, keg, crossed shovels over an anvil) on the other. In 1822, Lesslie & Sons issued a copper Two Penny token. The firm also issued halfpennies from 1824 to 1830.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Ontario)
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is the ministry of the Government of Ontario that is responsible for municipal affairs and housing in the Canadian province of Ontario. The Department of Municipal Affairs was established in 1934 by the Department of Municipal Affairs Act, which was passed in 1935. It inherited the municipal administrative and regulatory functions which had briefly been the responsibility of the Ontario Municipal Board. Initially, it was responsible for supervising the affairs of the municipalities whose real property tax-revenue base had collapsed during the Depression. After The Second World War, it became more involved in the provision of administrative and financial advice and support to municipalities. In April 1972, the department was dissolved, with most of its functions being transferred to the newly created Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Inter-governmental Affairs, but with the assessment function being given to the Ministry of Revenue. In 1973, the Ministry of Housing was established by The Ministry of Housing Act, inheriting the Plans Administration Branch from the Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Intergovernmental Affairs, as well as the Ontario Housing Corporation from the Ministry of Revenue.
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interesting variety of finds, wtg
 

Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
13,680
23,243
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab CTX 3030; Minelab Equinox 800;
XP Deus 2
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
After 4 previous hunts, I finally found a few things yesterday worth showing everyone. :thumbsup: This site just came available to me on May 1, so I detected it yesterday for about 4hrs before the rain moved in. A few interesting items popped up; the first find was 1816 Wellington Halfpenny. This coin is very thin and the details area not clear, obviously a copy made sometime in the 1820s or 30s. The porcelain doll heads and the bronze ‘Ministry of Housing Ontario’ plate were eyeball finds I found discarded under the back porch. I also found a couple of one-piece tombac buttons, a 1940 George Penny and few modern pennies. Something I found interesting about this site, was that the original horse stable was still being used, but as a garage for a car. The stable still had the feed trough and a spot where the horse would’ve been tied up. :o

I’m going to head back here again next weekend before the grass gets too tall to get the coil close to the ground.
Hope everyone has a great week!
Dave

Wellington Half Penny Token ‘Montreal’ 1816
Lower Canada (what is now Quebec) had the greatest number and variety of tokens in circulation. The Wellington tokens, a series of halfpenny and penny tokens with a bust of the Duke of Wellington, appeared in about 1814. They were popular, and many varieties were issued locally after 1825. In 1825, a halfpenny of Irish design was imported; its popularity resulted in its being imitated in brass, copies of which are very plentiful. In 1832, an anonymous halfpenny of English design appeared and was extensively imitated in brass. Counterfeits of worn-out English and Irish George III coppers also circulated in large numbers. These counterfeits were called “blacksmith tokens” as they were popularly believed to have been struck by a Montreal blacksmith to pay for his drink. This period ended in 1835, when the banks refused to accept such nondescript copper, except by weight. Upper Canada (what is now Ontario) first used local tokens after 1812, when a series of lightweight halfpennies was issued in memory of Sir Isaac Brock. These were superseded after 1825 by a series of tokens with a sloop on one side and various designs (e.g., plow, keg, crossed shovels over an anvil) on the other. In 1822, Lesslie & Sons issued a copper Two Penny token. The firm also issued halfpennies from 1824 to 1830.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Ontario)
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is the ministry of the Government of Ontario that is responsible for municipal affairs and housing in the Canadian province of Ontario. The Department of Municipal Affairs was established in 1934 by the Department of Municipal Affairs Act, which was passed in 1935. It inherited the municipal administrative and regulatory functions which had briefly been the responsibility of the Ontario Municipal Board. Initially, it was responsible for supervising the affairs of the municipalities whose real property tax-revenue base had collapsed during the Depression. After The Second World War, it became more involved in the provision of administrative and financial advice and support to municipalities. In April 1972, the department was dissolved, with most of its functions being transferred to the newly created Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Inter-governmental Affairs, but with the assessment function being given to the Ministry of Revenue. In 1973, the Ministry of Housing was established by The Ministry of Housing Act, inheriting the Plans Administration Branch from the Ministry of Treasury, Economics and Intergovernmental Affairs, as well as the Ontario Housing Corporation from the Ministry of Revenue.
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Very Cool!!! Congrats!!!
 

lenmac65

Bronze Member
Jul 28, 2009
1,808
5,036
Massachusetts
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Garrett AT Pro, Equinox 800 (as of 10/2019)
Primary Interest:
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Nice finds. I have missed your detailed posts and wonderfully preserved historic finds. Congrats!
 
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ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,346
26,141
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
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1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
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XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
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ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,346
26,141
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #15
Dave..beautiful post with great detail and glad to see ground conditions are starting to improve.
Thanks Bill, hope you're finding some treasures in NY.
Dave
 
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ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,346
26,141
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
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  • Thread starter
  • #16
As usual... great post... great pictures... of a what appears to be... a great day.

Well done Anti.
Thanks for your post ARC, hope everything is going well for you in FLA these days. :icon_thumright:
Dave
 
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ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,346
26,141
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #17
I'm curious as to the dates on the doll head finds... those are a little creepy but cool....great post!
Thanks for your interest CM... my best guess would be early 20thc, possibly 1900 - 20. :icon_scratch:

If anyone else has an idea of how old these porcelain doll heads are, I'd be interested.

Thanks,
Dave
 
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ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,346
26,141
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #20
Very nice finds indeed… But those dolls have me scared half to death!..
Thanks for your post Angelito. :thumbsup:
They are kinda creepy, I'm just amazed that they survived.
 

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