First possible native artifact?

jepjet

Greenie
Nov 8, 2010
11
1
Maine
Detector(s) used
Minelab
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
What I believe is a lightly worked scraper? Found along a Penobscot run stream just below a chokepoint following a significant confluence. High water this year really cleaned the banks, not as scoured as previous big ice out years but large eddies worked traditional high water bank where I found it laying exposed. Unsure of type and source. (Kineo, Munsungun) Porous, not glossy like lots of chert. The two toned color and texture are very distinct. Very smooth and pommel like on the dark side. Appears minimally worked with only four large flakes off of one side. Possibly a couple of broken spurs? Pretty sure user was a lefty. What do you think? Any info you would be appreciative as site is my homestead.
 

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dognose

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Apr 15, 2009
3,188
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I am not seeing any secondary edge work on this side, which is where I would expect to see it on a flake scraper like that. IMO
topside.jpg
 

MAMucker

Bronze Member
Feb 2, 2019
1,636
2,970
Massachusetts
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It is an artifact. It a large percussion flake.

I have to agree with dognose. Maybe a better focused photo would clearly show the edge work you see.
 

Gaspipe

Bronze Member
Sep 6, 2013
1,053
1,246
New England
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It is an artifact. It a large percussion flake.

I have to agree with dognose. Maybe a better focused photo would clearly show the edge work you see.
One of the cornflakes in my morning bowl of cereal showed signs of being worked . I am certain of it.
 

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jepjet

Greenie
Nov 8, 2010
11
1
Maine
Detector(s) used
Minelab
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
It is an artifact. It a large percussion flake.

I have to agree with dognose. Maybe a better focused photo would clearly show the edge work you see.

Thanks Guys, both of those comments round out most of what I'm seeing. A large primary flake, and no dognose, there isn't any secondary flaking on those 4 planes.

Those 4 planes however are 4 negative flakes on there own with much less wear than the primary plane on the lighter (non-cortex) side. As if they were done post initial flake then carried/weathered before being worked again. Maybe an ad hoc cutting tool?

Lastly, it is not local to my area and I'm leaning toward it being rhyolite which would suggest Mt Kineo.

Good news is I'm happy with it regardless and know there are artifacts here and I will keep looking!
 

uniface

Silver Member
Jun 4, 2009
3,216
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Central Pennsylvania
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The patiinated flakes were struck while it was still attached to the parent nucleus. No doubt on that point.

Differential patination could be due to its position in the ground over time (compare some Knife River Chalcedony pieces on which only one side is patinated).
 

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