Greg Family Gold

Tiredman

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Well that's pretty close to the title least in my upcoming book. I did see Thomas P Terry covered it with about 2 sentences in his United States Treasure Atlas. The brief details are a family buried a cache of dust near Saint Mary's Lake, and it is still there. Supposed to be up in Glacier County. Not much for details to start with for anyone interested in looking.
 
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Tiredman

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But since we are doing lost treasure stories and don't want to copy others work and wanting to raise the bar, we came up with a little something different. Finding all possible sources, and some do slip thru as we find out after a book release sometimes. I rewrite them, of course my wife says I can't write with a damn, so she modifies them and causes some debating at times. Validating articles from old newspapers are added.
 
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Tiredman

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For this story two articles were found, 1898 and 1930. There were slight differences in them but basically the same. Then a topo map is added which in most cases validates the terrain mentioned in the treasure story.
 
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Tiredman

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Our map did match the story on the families flight to safety. Still all stories are up to the reader as to if they are believable. This story appears to be local lore to me. But it will become the first story to start the book.
 
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Tiredman

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So why would this be included and the first story of a book? The answer is real simple, it is the entrance to Glacier National Park, lots of tourists traffic. It seems Montana the Treasure State, never had anyone cover the historical lost treasures and mines by tourist region.
 
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Tiredman

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Once Montana is done, it is on to Wyoming. An interesting turn from the start of this hobby of digging coins. The other interesting thing is once these books are up, they are perpetual for sales.
 
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Tiredman

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Now this book will be the one covering Glacier Country. It should take a good month or so to have up on Amazon with paper back and Kindle versions. My guess is roughly 400 pages. It is the 5th in the series, yes 4 are already out. If your into these kind of stories you will find the books without me giving the names.
 
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Tiredman

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Imagine lost treasure tales, local history and western reading all rolled into one. I think we will have success in the long run. The first books were picked up in February 2017 by a museum. The first book was up in August 2016 and up to now we have eleven titles out.
 
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Tiredman

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The future coverage for Montana is the section known as Gold West. It is big, my wife is researching the old short treasure briefs and says there is already 600-700 pages! And a lot to cover yet. We are thinking three volumes will be needed. As much as I have researched over the years much of what she is finding is new material to me.
 
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Tiredman

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An example of some interesting stuff is the old story that a tree bears Plummers name and marks a buried treasure. For years nothing more than that turned up. Now we have the story and a photo of the carving, how it was found and where the piece of firewood was housed. Yes, it was chopped down by locals for firewood, but since Plummer 1862 was on it, they knew it was special. To me this is a great research find.
 
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Tiredman

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Today's work went into that old story of the crazy woman of saint Mary's who is believed to have had a secret gold mine on Going to the Sun Mtn. We didn't find her, but found another with a mine that was pretty out spoken for the times. This one could have been twisted over the years into a lost mine story.
 
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Tiredman

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Up next is a story that was totally in error by one of the past authors. What we found was one of the most interesting true stories and half the loot is still missing!
 
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Tiredman

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The last post was in reference to the tale of train robbery loot hidden by Cut Bank and spotted by a Blackfoot who moved the cache and took some gold coins to town to drink up. Next morning he was dead. Research results: it never happened that way, but a large amount of 50,000 is still out there. Terry's version and what we found only match with the size of the haul.
 
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Tiredman

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Those two fellas who sold cattle and buried the money near Blackfoot. Is another in error. Story is true but it was buried elsewhere.
 
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Tiredman

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With so many stories having errors in locations and other details, it is understandable that some folks jump all over this kind of stuff. But then I myself wonder if the errors of past authors are a good thing! After all for those into reading such stories and buying various books on our favorite states, we often run across the same word for word accounts published 40-60 years apart, least I know I have. They have a name for that sort of thing. I just see it as a wide open market for new material.
 

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But since we are doing lost treasure stories and don't want to copy others work and wanting to raise the bar, we came up with a little something different. Finding all possible sources, and some do slip thru as we find out after a book release sometimes. I rewrite them, of course my wife says I can't write with a damn, so she modifies them and causes some debating at times. Validating articles from old newspapers are added.
Your wife is always right, unless you want to do house cleaning and all the cooking. Happy wife, happy life.
 
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Tiredman

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Your wife is always right, unless you want to do house cleaning and all the cooking. Happy wife, happy life.

I do all the house work too! She has had cancer with 3 surgeries so far. Think she is past it now. So I work double jobs 7 days a week. But she is the reason we got 11 titles up in 13 months.
 
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Tiredman

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Today's work resulted in $20,000 that should be very near a small mining camp, called Sylvanite. We have the time they left where they spent the night and when they returned. A very small window of time from a witnesses place who testified at trial.
 
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Tiredman

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This is from the train robbery that took place at Rondo, MT.
 
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Tiredman

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Covering the Pleasant Valley Mountain story of the discovery of rich gold in quartz samples (west of Kalispell). Also one north of Whitefish called the lost Moose mine, found nice topo maps for both.
 

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