🔎 UNIDENTIFIED ID help!

scarmyd291

Tenderfoot
Feb 23, 2024
5
6

Attachments

  • IMG_4640.jpeg
    IMG_4640.jpeg
    883.1 KB · Views: 44
  • IMG_4639.jpeg
    IMG_4639.jpeg
    752.2 KB · Views: 26
  • IMG_4638.jpeg
    IMG_4638.jpeg
    556.3 KB · Views: 26
  • IMG_4637.jpeg
    IMG_4637.jpeg
    664.3 KB · Views: 28

Robot

Bronze Member
Mar 10, 2014
2,013
1,706
Primary Interest:
Other
Hi scarmyd291,
To me ...It looks like an Iron Meteorite.
Where did you find them.
Meteorites are...Very valuable!

Meteorite Iron.jpg
Meteorite Iron 2.jpg
 

Upvote 0
OP
OP
S

scarmyd291

Tenderfoot
Feb 23, 2024
5
6
Hi scarmyd291,
To me ...It looks like an Iron Meteorite.
Where did you find them.
Meteorites are...Very valuable!

View attachment 2133160 View attachment 2133162
Sadly, with this one Im not sure where I found it. I’ve had it in my rock collection for years. I think as a kid I thought it was pretty because of the green but it’s actually quite a hideous rock 😂 I would guess somewhere near Richmond, Va.
 

Upvote 0
OP
OP
S

scarmyd291

Tenderfoot
Feb 23, 2024
5
6
To me, it looks like a version of Chalcedony or Agate (the light-colored stuff in photos #38 & 39), which is mostly hidden in the usual exterior matrix (in this case, the darker stuff).
Okay, I do have some chalcedony in my collection. It has similarities to would say. Although, a meteor sounds much cooler 😂. I actually do have this odd chunk of metal in my collection as well. I’ve always deep down hoped it was gold but am too chicken to actually find out so it’s a shelf ornament. 😂
 

Upvote 1

Fugio

Sr. Member
Feb 25, 2016
261
460
New Hampshire
Detector(s) used
Legend, AT Pro, Garret Pro-Pointer AT
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Okay, I do have some chalcedony in my collection. It has similarities to would say. Although, a meteor sounds much cooler 😂. I actually do have this odd chunk of metal in my collection as well. I’ve always deep down hoped it was gold but am too chicken to actually find out so it’s a shelf ornament. 😂
While I agree that a meteorite is much cooler, this certainly is not a meteorite. The appearance is all wrong, and you can see quartz (or similar) looking mineral on the outside which does not occur in meteorites.
 

Upvote 2

Bucket Lister

Sr. Member
Dec 20, 2023
289
448
Detector(s) used
XP Dēus II
XP MI-6
XP WSA II-XL
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
What is it than?
My best guess is a piece of basalt with some agatization going on. There are extinct(?) volcanoes in Virginia.

Can you help me too? Meteorite or not? It is magnetized.
Not meteorite.

When you say "magnetized", do you mean it's attracted to a magnet or it is a magnet (sometimes but not always the same thing).

Probably grey hematite or magnetite (I lean toward the latter).
 

Upvote 0

Red-Coat

Gold Member
Dec 23, 2019
5,242
16,437
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
If you do truly mean 'magnetised', it won't be basalt. As per my reply on your other thread, magnetism is lost when materials are heated above their Curie point. That would be the case during the formation of a basaltic rock. A basalt can be magnetic, but not magnetised.

In any case, it doesn't look like a basalt and the only commonly found mineral which exhibits magnetism is magnetite (and rocks or mixed iron oxide mineral deposits containing significant proportions of magnetiite).
 

Upvote 0

Robot

Bronze Member
Mar 10, 2014
2,013
1,706
Primary Interest:
Other
There have been several Meteorite crashes near your location in Virginia.
Possibly like this octahedrite meteorite located in Norfolk Virgina.

distinguish meteorites from other rocks:

  • Density: Meteorites are usually quite heavy for their size, since they contain metallic iron and dense minerals.
  • Magnetic: Since most meteorites contain metallic iron, a magnet will often stick to them. For “stony” meteorites, a magnet might not stick, but if you hang the magnet by a string, it will be attracted.
  • Unusual shape: iron-nickel meteorites are rarely rounded. Instead, they have an irregular shape with unusual pits like finger prints in their surface called “regmaglypts.”
  • Fusion crust: stony meteorites typically have a thin crust on their surface where it melted as it passed through the atmosphere.
 

Upvote 0

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top