Interesting Harrison County Flint flake scraper

dognose

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Apr 15, 2009
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Indiana find today 12/13/2020
Includes spokeshaves on each "blade" edge. I term the base the bottom non-knapped edge
BLADE.jpg

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20201213_204442.jpg 20201213_204503.jpg
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dognose

dognose

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Harrison County is one of the more widely used flint across the Midwest and eastern united states. It is one of my favorites. I used to find a lot more Harrison County in the 80s and 90s than I do now. But then again once I search a field I tend not to find too many relics in the field in the same season, so those two points may be tied together.

Interesting enough, This flake scraper and another point found the same day, have flake area which appear under magnification to have what some may consider a flake that SHOULD have been removed due to the freeze, thaw, freeze thaw physical weathering.

This manner of weathering occurs when water continually seeps into cracks, freezes and expands, eventually breaking the rock apart.

Some use this as an indicator to determine if a relic is old or not, a basis for authentication.

I have read much about this and tend to agree to a point. However these two relics would indicate this "theory" also has its holes.
 

H.P.

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Aug 15, 2020
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Safety Harbor Florida
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Harrison County is one of the more widely used flint across the Midwest and eastern united states. It is one of my favorites. I used to find a lot more Harrison County in the 80s and 90s than I do now. But then again once I search a field I tend not to find too many relics in the field in the same season, so those two points may be tied together.

Interesting enough, This flake scraper and another point found the same day, have flake area which appear under magnification to have what some may consider a flake that SHOULD have been removed due to the freeze, thaw, freeze thaw physical weathering.

This manner of weathering occurs when water continually seeps into cracks, freezes and expands, eventually breaking the rock apart.

Some use this as an indicator to determine if a relic is old or not, a basis for authentication.

I have read much about this and tend to agree to a point. However these two relics would indicate this "theory" also has its holes.
Freeze factor does not apply to Florida points,
 

outlaws15

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Jul 1, 2020
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Missouri
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I got back to this thread from the burin thread.
So the burin on this piece was used for engraving? Seems hard to use this tool for that.
I understand that a tool can have many uses, but to try to hold this piece with sharp edges and pressing down with force to engrave seems difficult. Im sure this piece is worn.
These are really all questions to better understand what I'm looking for while out hunting.
Thanks
 
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dognose

dognose

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I don't think burins need to be extremely large or long. The tip is the important engraving tool. It could be that harder material needed more swipes.
 

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