Looking for help from Treasure Coast hunters

Tikibarowner

Tenderfoot
Aug 28, 2019
6
23
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I am headed to the east coast of Florida next week to visit relatives and there happens to be a storm currently forecast to impact the Treasure Coast at the same time I will be there. I have some basic information on the 1715 fleet wrecks and where to go, but looking for guidance and advice from Treasure Coast veterans regarding how, when and where to hunt so that I abide by all laws and courtesies while I am out.

I understand I have to stay off the dunes and out of the water, but how are those boundaries determined? Is the only area of the beach where you are allowed to hunt located between the high tides mark and the low tide marks? Is any wet area considered "in the water"? Are small inlets cut into the sand by storm action with standing or tidal water considered "in the water"? Can you detect in the water if you are outside the 3000' water lease wreck radius? I assume you use GPS to determine that edge of that radius?

Can you hunt from sun rise to sun set? Do they close the beaches during storms, or are you just expected to use common sense when it comes to safety?

Should I expect to see a bunch of people detecting during or after a storm event? Is there some type of etiquette or courtesy that hunters abide by (distance away from each other, etc.)

I have never detected on a beach before, so any other advice is welcome.

I am using an Equinox 800 so any setting suggestions are also welcome.

Lastly, I am driving a pickup truck down from Virginia. If the storm gets bad, is there some item(s) that you know from past experience would be helpful to me to bring down to donate when I get there to help out, like tarps, water, batteries etc?
 

Upvote 0

Deesherman

Jr. Member
Aug 23, 2018
45
138
Palm Bay,Florida
Detector(s) used
Garrett sea hunter 11
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Yeah Me too

I am headed to the east coast of Florida next week to visit relatives and there happens to be a storm currently forecast to impact the Treasure Coast at the same time I will be there. I have some basic information on the 1715 fleet wrecks and where to go, but looking for guidance and advice from Treasure Coast veterans regarding how, when and where to hunt so that I abide by all laws and courtesies while I am out.

I understand I have to stay off the dunes and out of the water, but how are those boundaries determined? Is the only area of the beach where you are allowed to hunt located between the high tides mark and the low tide marks? Is any wet area considered "in the water"? Are small inlets cut into the sand by storm action with standing or tidal water considered "in the water"? Can you detect in the water if you are outside the 3000' water lease wreck radius? I assume you use GPS to determine that edge of that radius?

Can you hunt from sun rise to sun set? Do they close the beaches during storms, or are you just expected to use common sense when it comes to safety?

Should I expect to see a bunch of people detecting during or after a storm event? Is there some type of etiquette or courtesy that hunters abide by (distance away from each other, etc.)

I have never detected on a beach before, so any other advice is welcome.

I am using an Equinox 800 so any setting suggestions are also welcome.

Lastly, I am driving a pickup truck down from Virginia. If the storm gets bad, is there some item(s) that you know from past experience would be helpful to me to bring down to donate when I get there to help out, like tarps, water, batteries etc?

I also would like some info
Will the Police stop us from going to the beach
What are the signs of a good area to detect
Thanks
 

ColonelDan

Hero Member
Jan 19, 2014
998
2,163
Central Florida
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
1
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
Deus II
Primary Interest:
Beach & Shallow Water Hunting
Below is a short summary of the major restrictions for our Treasure Coast:

A Very Brief Florida State Law Overview:

You are allowed to hunt the beaches from the foot of the Dune to the low tide line and that includes the beaches adjacent to the 1715 Fleet of Spanish shipwrecks.

Inside State parks you are required to get written permission from the Park Ranger before you detect in the park. Some State Parks will allow metal detectors in the park.

Do not bring your metal detector into a National Park in Florida, this includes all beaches and waters adjacent to the National Park.

In June 2005, the state of Florida did away with the Isolated Finds Program. The Isolated Finds Program provided the treasure hunter with the ability to keep a find as long as the state was provided with the location of the find.

You can dive on Treasure Coast wrecks, however, you must NOT have a metal detector in the ocean lease site, and you must stay 300 feet away from dive boats that are working the lease area. Do NOT bring a metal detector within the 3,000 yard radius lease area while in the water. Check the GPS coordinates listed in this article for the various site leases. It is very wise to do your own research from a second or third source before visiting a wreck site to validate the GPS coordinates and restrictions for the site.



Yes, you can hunt from sunrise to sun set...and beyond.

You can expect to see fellow detectorists at any time but particularly after a storm.

When detecting the treasure coast I always use all metal. Many a fine artifact has been recovered composed of ferrous material...dig it all.

Concentrate on obvious low spots and along and around cuts in the sand.

I also use the EQX 800 so I always noise cancel first step into the area and check ground balance. I use Beach 1 on dry and damp sand; Beach 2 on wet sand and anyplace where the surf can cover the coil. My settings for Beach 1 = tracking off, volume 25, threshold 0, recovery 3, iron bias 0, 3 tones, sensitivity per conditions. All these are just personal preferences but they've worked well for me.

In Beach 2, I use factory settings of tracking on, recovery of 6 and iron bias of 6 to begin with but adjust as conditions dictate. I also prefer volume 25, and threshold 0.

Bring and use plenty of sun block and drink a lot of water.

Hard sole beach shoes will protect you from trash and sharp shells.

I'm sure I've forgotten something that others will fill in. We have many experienced detectorists down here and all are mighty fine people!
 

Last edited:

ColonelDan

Hero Member
Jan 19, 2014
998
2,163
Central Florida
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
1
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
Deus II
Primary Interest:
Beach & Shallow Water Hunting
I also would like some info
Will the Police stop us from going to the beach
What are the signs of a good area to detect
Thanks

Nothing to fear from the local police or the beach patrol...they've seen thousands of people swinging detectors. Now if you're in violation of the law, they'll take note of that! 8-)

"Good areas to detect" Is any place where depositors have made deposits! :laughing7:

Seriously though, I've found good "stuff" at many of our beaches...in the dry, damp, wet and surf. Look for high traffic areas if you want recent drops, in and along trenches and low spots in the water...If along the Treasure Coast however, stay out of the water. Otherwise, have at it. On the wet sand and surf, I hunt a bit before and during low tide. Don't ignore the high tide line either. Many things are washed up with the rising tide. On the dry sand, I focus on areas of high activity...towel line, beach entrances, volley ball nets...areas like that.

Good luck to you both....
 

OP
OP
T

Tikibarowner

Tenderfoot
Aug 28, 2019
6
23
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
ColonelDan, Thanks! That's a real help, and special thanks for the 800 settings!
 

OP
OP
T

Tikibarowner

Tenderfoot
Aug 28, 2019
6
23
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Now if you're in violation of the law, they'll take note of that!

Thanks, and this sound like a strange question, but I want to make sure since I have never worked a beach before. After the waves crash and run up the beach, that area that is wet and covered with water for a few seconds until it runs back down to the ocean, that's not "in the water", right? "In the water" is where water is standing all the time?
 

Last edited:

ColonelDan

Hero Member
Jan 19, 2014
998
2,163
Central Florida
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
1
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
Deus II
Primary Interest:
Beach & Shallow Water Hunting
Thanks, and this sound like a strange question, but I want to make sure since I have never worked a beach before. After the waves crash and run up the beach, that area that is wet and covered with water for a few seconds until it runs back down to the ocean, that's not "in the water", right? "In the water" is where water is standing all the time?

The area you described is the what I call the wet sand. The waves come up, cover and saturate the sand then retreat back to the ocean. "In the water" is the standing surf.

Good luck....
 

smokeythecat

Gold Member
Nov 22, 2012
20,713
40,793
Maryland
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
10
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
XP Deus II
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
As far as hurricanes go, most times around here the police close off the affected areas to outsiders. They did that during Sandy, the last monster storm we had up north here.
 

A2coins

Gold Member
Dec 20, 2015
33,807
42,606
Ann Arbor
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Good luck stay safe have fun and welcome to tnet from MI Tommy
 

Billieg

Sr. Member
Jul 19, 2019
388
833
Deltona Fl
Detector(s) used
AT-Pro - Teknetics T2 LTD
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I wouldn't worry about high tide/low tide areas. If you can reach the area without getting your neck wet no one will bother you just don't detect in the dunes. The hurricane isn't expected until 2pm Monday so the rough waves Saturday and Sunday should wash up some nice stuff. If we luck out it will skirt the coast and you can be out there anytime. From Vero beach up to Sebastian inlet is where people find the Spanish coins. I lived on Vero beach for a year and detected almost everyday. I even went out right after a hurricane but didn't find Spanish. The hurricane took out almost 12' of sand off the beach. A neighbor of mine had a cigar box full of Spanish coins and jewelry he found over the years. Come down and have some fun. You might even see me out there on Sunday, Monday,Tuesday or Wed. or maybe all of those days!
 

Last edited:

Billieg

Sr. Member
Jul 19, 2019
388
833
Deltona Fl
Detector(s) used
AT-Pro - Teknetics T2 LTD
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
"I also would like some info
Will the Police stop us from going to the beach
What are the signs of a good area to detect
Thanks "

"As far as hurricanes go, most times around here the police close off the affected areas to outsiders. They did that during Sandy, the last monster storm we had up north here. "

They won't let you go into residential areas but you can get to the beach if it's a public access beach. Also, if hunting after dark you can't use a flashlight because of the turtle nests...

"Lastly, I am driving a pickup truck down from Virginia. If the storm gets bad, is there some item(s) that you know from past experience would be helpful to me to bring down to donate when I get there to help out, like tarps, water, batteries etc? "

Bring pizza and beer....
 

Last edited:

CASPER-2

Gold Member
Jan 3, 2012
17,158
19,959
NEW ENGLAND
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
1
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
6
Detector(s) used
WHITE'S XLT, PI PRO, GARRETT 2500, 3- FISHER CZ21s, JW FISHER 8X
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
nothing to fear from police but I was down there after hurricane and police were throwing guys out of an area
and only allowing fellow police into an area that was producing gold coins


Nothing to fear from the local police or the beach patrol...they've seen thousands of people swinging detectors. Now if you're in violation of the law, they'll take note of that! 8-)

"Good areas to detect" Is any place where depositors have made deposits! :laughing7:

Seriously though, I've found good "stuff" at many of our beaches...in the dry, damp, wet and surf. Look for high traffic areas if you want recent drops, in and along trenches and low spots in the water...If along the Treasure Coast however, stay out of the water. Otherwise, have at it. On the wet sand and surf, I hunt a bit before and during low tide. Don't ignore the high tide line either. Many things are washed up with the rising tide. On the dry sand, I focus on areas of high activity...towel line, beach entrances, volley ball nets...areas like that.

Good luck to you both....
 

FloridaSon

Sr. Member
Sep 29, 2018
320
564
Between Half Reale Beach and Nuestra Seflora de La
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
Garrett, Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
Beach & Shallow Water Hunting
You guys planning to come here do realize if this thing impacts the treasure coast or any other part as strong as forecast there will be no place to stay, no restaurants open for days, no gas stations or grocery stores open until power is restored? At that point you will be a burden to whatever area you are in. At least plan to be self sufficient for the time you are here. While police here are not to be feared, they may see out of state vehicles as potential looters. Even if we have a near miss not a landfall, Power will be out. If you are not familiar with ocean waves stay out of the surf. Waves can break large every so often and can pull you out or break your equipment. Learn how to recognize and get yourself out if A rip current. Welcome to paradise - born and raised.
 

CASPER-2

Gold Member
Jan 3, 2012
17,158
19,959
NEW ENGLAND
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
1
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
6
Detector(s) used
WHITE'S XLT, PI PRO, GARRETT 2500, 3- FISHER CZ21s, JW FISHER 8X
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
i came down after 2 hurricanes in a row and found a place - just dont look for a place on the beach or down the street
save yourself some time and trouble - look and possibly even book a place now --half hour plus inland away from shore
before locals do when it hits you can always cancel usually within 24hrs if your plans change

You guys planning to come here do realize if this thing impacts the treasure coast or any other part as strong as forecast there will be no place to stay, no restaurants open for days, no gas stations or grocery stores open until power is restored? At that point you will be a burden to whatever area you are in. At least plan to be self sufficient for the time you are here. While police here are not to be feared, they may see out of state vehicles as potential looters. Even if we have a near miss not a landfall, Power will be out. If you are not familiar with ocean waves stay out of the surf. Waves can break large every so often and can pull you out or break your equipment. Learn how to recognize and get yourself out if A rip current. Welcome to paradise - born and raised.
 

OP
OP
T

Tikibarowner

Tenderfoot
Aug 28, 2019
6
23
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Thanks to everyone for the info! Very helpful! Glad to be part of this community!
 

Last edited:

dewcon4414

Bronze Member
Mar 22, 2006
2,138
1,237
Gulf Coast, Fl
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
4
Detector(s) used
MDT, Nox, Blue Xcals and CTX
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Actually you can use a flashlight....it has to use red bulbs.....and a regular light can’t be used on the beach, which the wet sand is not a part of. It’s battening down the hatches for me and hopefully electric stays on and no damage. I’ll settle for left overs after the storm.
 

biggmike

Hero Member
May 27, 2010
750
724
Florida
πŸ₯‡ Banner finds
2
πŸ† Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
CZ7A Pro / CZ21 / F75 LTD
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
If you get down to the beach soon after the storm passes make sure to take extra caution. It won't be like your normal beach conditions. The last time I hunted after a hurricane huge waves would come out of nowhere and can absolutely take you back out with them and the current was ripping. While hunting about 10 feet from the water line I looked up to see the surf climbing and I retreated immediately and still was knee deep before I got away. It was a lot scarier than it sounds and also there were huge timbers (I think from docks or piers maybe)and tree parts it the surf that you can not see. Just use caution and common sense and do not enter or even get too close to the water then you will be fine. Most of the good finds were coming from where the dunes eroded away but like everyone else said don't get too close because that's what can get you in trouble with the law. Good luck....
 

Last edited:

cheech

Hero Member
May 6, 2012
930
935
FL
Detector(s) used
white's BeachHunter 300/DFX
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
nothing to fear from police but I was down there after hurricane and police were throwing guys out of an area
and only allowing fellow police into an area that was producing gold coins

Would like to be on the inside to get first grabs
 

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Latest Discussions

Top