Re: The Sherman

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rickgainey

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Re: The Sherman

Thanks for the information, guys.... I have confirmed that the Sherman is in fact the former U. S. S. General Sherman. I'm continuing my historical research into this ship. It would appear that "black ops" was invented/utilized by the U. S. Govt. long before the OSS/CIA connection. This ship is a cornerstone in our history regarding the current standoff between North Korea and the U. S.... perhaps I'll write a book.

If you bump into anything else interesting please let me know.

See you in the mud!

Rick Gainey
 

mad4wrecks

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Re: The Sherman

*sigh* I don't think he understood a single word we wrote, regarding the Sherman off Little River Inlet SC., in the other thread!

::)
 

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rickgainey

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Re: The Sherman

This is for gdaddyflex and anybody else who might help me.... if you have documentation or providence to indicate that the Sherman off Little River Inlet is not the former General Sherman I'd like to see the source.... I have done a great deal of research in Library of Congress, US Naval Archives, and other noted sources but have not found any evidence repudiating this premise. Let's keep it positive,folks and professional......
 

ScubaDude

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Re: The Sherman

Rick, the wreck 7 nm SE of little river is not a side wheeler as you suggest it is. Look at the scans below; you can clearly see an engine, a shaft, a propeller, and a rudder. In the firat scan its at the top of the image, and in the second scan its at the bottom, along with a nice shadow of the cut out in the rudder with the prop inside.

Have you dove on some wreck in this area and seen paddle wheels?

As I understand it, there are two wrecks: Sherman (SC), General Sherman (Korea).
 

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Darren in NC

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Re: The Sherman

Tom, in fairness to Rick, I wrote my response after he wrote this, but I think your reply had been written already. I'm not sure why we have two threads about it, though. One would be simpler.

Rick, it is not our job to prove something is not so, but your job to prove that it is. Per the other thread, you have our proof that they are not the same vessel. Rather than tell us you've done research, why not share with us the specifics of that research so we can see where you're coming from. I am a pretty open guy who is ready to admit I'm wrong if so shown. You don't know me, but I say all this with genuine respect in hopes we can have an intelligent dialogue about the history of the Sherman.

Godspeed!
Darren
 

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rickgainey

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Re: The Sherman

Thanks, guys....

I agree with everything that most everybody says regarding the wreck off Little River Inlet. What I'm trying to prove by both "thinking outside of the box" and historical research is that this ship played a much larger role in world history than anybody has sumised to date. I'm not sure about why there are two threads either but let me state where my research is coming from:

Reviewing my own records from a survey done in 1986 I discovered the error that confirms the wreck is a large tonnage steam screw vessel. My hypothesis is that both of the titles General Sherman and Sherman have been used interchangably but not necessarily in error. My research involves records from the Library of Congress, the Navy Department's Naval Historical Center, Wikipedia, Navy History.com,and other national and international websites with references to this ship and her history.

I'm not trying to dispute this claim with anyone, but rather, I'm attempting to find additional information to either suport or deny the hypothesis. Right now, I'm accumulating a dearth of information to support that premise, not deny it. If anybody has some specific reference's that will do either, I'm all ears. In specific, I need information regarding the somewhat shadowy period of her operation from 1865 to 1874 when she passed from the US Navy to Samuel Cook, who fitted her out for a trade mission with China to include cannon (unusual for a trade ship?), recieved a ship by the same name back from the Koreans in 1867 (who were forced to give it up by the Chinese) and who later sold it to Weld Company who refitted her for East Coast/Gulf trade and lost her in a storm due enroute to New Orleans in the vicininty of Cape Fear, N.C. (adjacent to Little River Inlet) in 1874. These statements are all documented facts gleaned from the research, but I'm looking for the missing links.... I'll continue looking.
 

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