So perhaps this is an undocumented colonial coin?

Ocean7

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What I have is smooth slab colonial copper with almost perfectly aligned clay pipes in a circle. I'll assume they used large coppers, ground them smooth, and then added these 5 pipes. If interested
in further info - look here:

https://www.academia.edu/10032294/PAS_Roundup_2012
page 394-5
Figure 10

"Bradfield, West Berkshire
(PAS database SUR-CD7612; finder Andy Thompson; identification and recording David Williams, Surrey FLO, and David Higgins, clay pipe specialist).Token made from a copper-alloy halfpenny of George I (r. 1714–27) or George II (r. 1727–60), which has been worn smooth and then stamped with various symbols on both surfaces (Fig. 10). One face shows three (clay) tobacco pipes of vary-ing forms; the letter D; a quadrilateral; a rod with star; and a rod with trefoil. The other face shows a rod with star, similar to that on the other face. Dimensions: diameter 28.19mm; weight 6.67g. Given the symbols used and the fact that the object is not made from precious metal, it seems likely it was counter-stamped for use by a mer-chant, perhaps for advertising purposes. No other tokens with clay pipe motifs are recorded on the PAS database, but other examples are known, including tokens stamped with the name of the merchant.
20
Other motifs are found on PAS-recorded Georgian coins, such as the alchemical symbol for mercury, floral/sun motif and letters.
21
It seems 1797 pennies and halfpennies were favou-rite coins to countermark, though these are usually found extremely worn, suggesting they were either deliberately smoothed to countermark or counter-marking took place at a later date on an issue of prolonged circulation."

Then there is a coin showing clay pipe countermarks here:

This was found outside Phila., Pa. One side is blank. It was found in same vicinity as a 1723 Spanish 2 Reale, which may indicate just how old it could be.
So this is my theory and my theory alone - it was a coin being used before the 13 original Colonies had real money. I have no way of proving this but it
seems like it is possible. The who, what, where, why, and when? Ah there's the rub. Tell me what you think? But make sure to see the figure on academia.edu
before you respond. Thanks for reading.
 

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l.cutler

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OK, it seems just about impossible to download the article. Definitely some kind of counterstamp but when or who, I have no idea. I can't go along with it being before the 13 colonies had real money though, as the 1787 Connecticut copper that is pictured was made just about at the beginning of a huge copper panic when there were just way too many of them in circulation. This caused the value to drop on all of these coins. It was counterstamped at some point after it was made, so that would have been later right in this copper glut. The states hadn't been colonies for some time at this point as well. Seems to me that it is likely just the counterstamp of some merchant, probably one that sold tobacco or related items. Certainly something of interest for further research though.
 
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Ocean7

Ocean7

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well whole article appears directly below first page of link with "free download" buttons. I did not even try them.
Figure 10 can be seen not many page below there where article starts.
Yes, I always 'assumed' merchant token but then further info. as listed in my post - started me thinking I was looking in the wrong place. 'Could it be' as the History channel loves to say all the time. Thanks for your response.
BELOW IS THAT FIGURE 10 FROM ARTICLE MENTIONED.
 

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Bramblefind

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Great find! I've seen counterstamps like this a few times before. Here are some more examples - one cartwheel is stamped with the pipes and also has the name of a clay pipe maker. I think it is possible there could be more significance to what is on your coin (the number of stamps and the design) it may have been something known in the locality for a period of time. It may be able to be discovered or we may never know.




 
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Ocean7

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thanks Bramblefind, some really good info and pics in your links! Cool!
I have considered it was made in England and then carried across the sea.
And who knows how many were actually made. Maybe it meant 5 cents.
I will assume it's rarity is pretty high. When I first posted it, I was contacted
by someone from England on this site, who wanted to buy it. Of course,
I didn't sell it. Thank for your response!

 

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