Some New Old Finds!

The Rebel

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Sep 20, 2011
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Took yesterday off of work and headed back up to Warren to some old spots of mine.

Found my very 1st point on the lip of the cellar hole. It's called a Lamoka Point, New York State Museum - Projectile Point Type Collection (nysed.gov)

As I've now learned it was probably used as a knife rather than an arrowhead. Points are sharpened objects made before the invention of arrow heads.

The IH is 1874.

Also found this cool cigar tin, I'm researching the age but feels it's in the early 1910's-1919.

HH!
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Red-Coat

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Cool finds.

This ad was from the trade publication “Cigar Store Magazine” of 1900-1902:

Sweet Violet.jpg


There was accompanying text on “how to light a cigar” from J. Edward Cowles, Manager of the Cigar Department of Austin, Nichols & Co.:

“Ever see two men light a cigar in the same way? No? Well, notice how the next man does it for the curiosity of the thing. Not one man in ten knows how to light his cigar properly, or so as to obtain the best results, Fire is necessary of course, but a precious little of it lights a cigar. One man goes at it with a suction pump sort of a struggle, as though he were determined to suck all of the gas in the pipe through his cigar and was in a hurry to accomplish the job. He deliberately holds his cigar in the flame and puffs away for dear life until a third of it is burned up and the rest of it spoiled for smoking purposes. There is a difference between burning a cigar and smoking it. Overheat a cigar, or coal up the tobacco, and you will have a rank-tasting, badly-burning cigar, unfit to smoke, no matter how good the tobacco is, or how well-made the cigar may be. A spark or a single touch of flame will light a small tuck cigar thoroughly and well. Don't puff away like a steam engine, and then let the fire go out. A cigar will never taste good after relighting. First light it, let it cool a little, then keep it so; smoke regularly, mildly and moderately and you will have a cool, sweet smoke to the finish. A little art and common sense will make a good 5c cigar taste better than a 15c. Havana improperly treated.”
 

BennyV

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Maybe I’ll take a ride to Goshen and check that place out. Only a little always from me.
 

Gare

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Presently using Deus 2's & have Minelabs, Nokta's Tesoro's DEus's Have them all . Have WAY to many need to get rid of some
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Nice going :)
 

pepperj

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Congrats on your 1st native piece/knife, and the IHP.
Getting the advertising information for cigars is a cool recovery
 

Red-Coat

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Dec 23, 2019
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When I saw “Austin Nichols” it rang a bell.

Yes. It’s the same company. With its origins in 1850 as the NY wholesale grocer Fitts, Martin & Clough they became Fitts & Turner in 1855 and then Fitts, Austin & Turner in 1861 when Robert F. Austin joined the company, which then reorganised as Fitts & Austin. Then in 1878/9 James E. Nichols purchased an interest in the company, which became Austin, Nichols & Co.

They specialised in tea and coffee but also produced and distributed comestibles in general as well as creating and distributing many brands of cigar. They entered the wines and spirits market in 1934, using the Ripy Brothers distillery in Kentucky as a contract producer from 1935. In 1939 they ceased grocery distribution and shifted all their resources to wine and spirits sales. The Wild Turkey brand of bourbon was envisioned in 1940 and sourced from Ripy Brothers plus other Kentucky distilleries from 1942.
 

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The Rebel

The Rebel

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Sep 20, 2011
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Southwest, CT
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Maybe I’ll take a ride to Goshen and check that place out. Only a little always from me.
Goshen has a lot of open spaces.
 

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Digger RJ

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Aug 24, 2017
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Took yesterday off of work and headed back up to Warren to some old spots of mine.

Found my very 1st point on the lip of the cellar hole. It's called a Lamoka Point, New York State Museum - Projectile Point Type Collection (nysed.gov)

As I've now learned it was probably used as a knife rather than an arrowhead. Points are sharpened objects made before the invention of arrow heads.

The IH is 1874.

Also found this cool cigar tin, I'm researching the age but feels it's in the early 1910's-1919.

HH! View attachment 2118263 View attachment 2118264 View attachment 2118265 View attachment 2118266
Very Cool!!! Congrats!!!
 

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