Underwater metal detecting on Florida east coast

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OBXmetalDet

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1. You can't underwater metal detect for Spanish coins, etc. in leased waters, but can you underwater metal detect for rings that people lose in leased waters?

2. Can you underwater metal detect for Spanish treasure outside of leased waters?

3. If you look at the part that is defined as the Treasure Coast, how much of that is leased?

4. On another thread I think somebody posted that you can't recover artifacts older than 50 years from the water that is within 3 miles of the Eastern coast. Does this mean that if you are beyond 3 miles you can legally recover artifacts older than 50 years?
 

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vpnavy

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Until a member(s) pipes in - you might consider posting this on Forum: Florida for more exposure...
 

cudamark

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1. You can't underwater metal detect for Spanish coins, etc. in leased waters, but can you underwater metal detect for rings that people lose in leased waters?

2. Can you underwater metal detect for Spanish treasure outside of leased waters?

3. If you look at the part that is defined as the Treasure Coast, how much of that is leased?

4. On another thread I think somebody posted that you can't recover artifacts older than 50 years from the water that is within 3 miles of the Eastern coast. Does this mean that if you are beyond 3 miles you can legally recover artifacts older than 50 years?
I can't cite any actual written law, but, from what I understand, in leased waters, you can't detect in the water at all for anything without permission from the lease holder. Outside of leased areas should be open for detecting. The 50 year law is part of ARPA. It generally doesn't apply to coins. You may want to look up ARPA to get the details. I've never heard of anyone having a problem finding and keeping 50+ year old jewelry and relics in public sites not deemed "Historic". Private property finds are up to you and the land owner.
 

Treasure_Hunter

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You can not metal detect for anything in leased waters unless you are a lessee or work for lessee, you can not even put the coil in one inch of water without violating the law.
 

detectorcowboy

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You can legally detect from the waterline to the dune line in Florida.
Never in the dunes ever.
I see people detecting in the water, never seen them getting harassed.
 

Treasure_Hunter

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You can legally detect from the waterline to the dune line in Florida.
Never in the dunes ever.
I see people detecting in the water, never seen them getting harassed.
It is the law, you can not detect in the water on the leases, it is a 3rd degree felony to illegally hunt the leased sites, they are considered archaeological sites, protected under the Florida's Historical Resourses Act, the police/state have the legal power to impound and you forfeit your detector, and any vehicles used in the commission of the crime, and it is a crime, it is a 3rd degree felony.

"Florida Historical Resources Act​

Florida's antiquities law (Chapter 267, Florida Statutes), and administrative rules (Chapters 1A-31 and 1A-32, Florida Administrative Code) govern the use of publicly-owned archaeological and historical resources located on state property, both on land and in the water. Administered by the Florida Division of Historical resources, the law establishes programs and policies to encourage preservation of historic resources for the public benefit. State-owned underwater resources are those that are located on the bottom of navigable rivers, streams, lakes, bays, and offshore (in the Gulf of Mexico out to 10 miles, and in the Atlantic out to 3 miles).

Major goals of Florida's historic preservation program are to identify, register, protect, and preserve significant historical resources which belong to the public. Divers are encouraged to participate in the identification, recording, and reporting of underwater sites in order to preserve them. However, disturbing or digging of publicly-owned sites is illegal unless permission is obtained in advance from the Division of Historical Resources. Intentional excavation of underwater sites without written authorization is considered a third-degree felony. Its best to record and report what you find, and seek help to proceed with further investigation."
 

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detectorcowboy

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It is the law, you can not detect in the water on the leases, it is a 3rd degree felony to illegally hunt the leased sites, they are considered archaeological sites, protected under the Florida's Historical Resourses Act, the police/state have the legal power to impound and you forfeit your detector, and any vehicles used in the commission of the crime, and it is a crime, it is a 3rd degree felony.

"Florida Historical Resources Act​

Florida's antiquities law (Chapter 267, Florida Statutes), and administrative rules (Chapters 1A-31 and 1A-32, Florida Administrative Code) govern the use of publicly-owned archaeological and historical resources located on state property, both on land and in the water. Administered by the Florida Division of Historical resources, the law establishes programs and policies to encourage preservation of historic resources for the public benefit. State-owned underwater resources are those that are located on the bottom of navigable rivers, streams, lakes, bays, and offshore (in the Gulf of Mexico out to 10 miles, and in the Atlantic out to 3 miles).

Major goals of Florida's historic preservation program are to identify, register, protect, and preserve significant historical resources which belong to the public. Divers are encouraged to participate in the identification, recording, and reporting of underwater sites in order to preserve them. However, disturbing or digging of publicly-owned sites is illegal unless permission is obtained in advance from the Division of Historical Resources. Intentional excavation of underwater sites without written authorization is considered a third-degree felony. Its best to record and report what you find, and seek help to proceed with further investigation."
C'mon man the people detecting in the water are mostly tourist on vacation & who cares the lifeguards? NOBODY
Of course I'm not talking about people in scuba gear. I'm talking about just some Joe Smoe with a detector in knee deep water on vacation
 

Treasure_Hunter

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C'mon man the people detecting in the water are mostly tourist on vacation & who cares the lifeguards? NOBODY
Of course I'm not talking about people in scuba gear. I'm talking about just some Joe Smoe with a detector in knee deep water on vacation
I am a Florida native and I also know Florida law on detecting the Treasure coast leases and have already quoted the law. There are not wall to wall people in the water detecting the Treasure coast lease sites, but there are times there are a couple dozen people detecting between the water line and the dunes on the Treasure coast, especially after a big storm.

It also violates our rules to encourage people to break Florida law.
 

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