Unusual rifle trigger guard, 1879 Indian head, Civil war round ball and tootsie toy car made a good week

tnt-hunter

Bronze Member
Apr 20, 2018
1,771
8,959
Mountain Maryland
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
9
Detector(s) used
Fisher CZ-21, Minelab Equinix 800, ,Garret AT Pro,
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
DAY 1
I found out about a park in the nearby town that I have not detected. It is very small and overgrown and hasn’t been used in years. I don’t think the park is very old, it probably had a short life.

I spent 3 hours going over every inch of available space and found 28 coins with a face value of $1.03 (lots of pennies), a round ball, an aluminum token, a sinker, an old padlock, a toy car, part of an old brass safety razor, a few tabs and some can slaw.

DSCN3005.jpeg


The toy car is a Tootsie Toy made in Chicago. I’m not sure of the exact age, but definitely an older car. The round ball is a .69 caliber and from the location near one of the civil war camps and the caliber I’m pretty sure it is civil war. The acid soil did a real number on the aluminum token but I can see just enough to know it is a president Warren G. Harding token. There have been a number of aluminum presidential sets made over the years. This is basically trash because of the poor condition, but it is an interesting find anyway.

DSCN3006.jpeg


I still had some time left so I went to a set of playing fields I have detected before hoping for some more goodies. I spent another 1.5 hours swingin the CZ21 and found 58 coins with a face value of $2.72, a brass whatzit, a couple of tabs and some can slaw.

DSCN3007.jpeg


DAY 2
I had a chance to get back to the scout camp and spent 6 hours swingin the CZ21 doing a quick recheck on 2 sites I did about 4 years ago. I found 83 coins with a face value of $9.86, 39 camp tent pegs, a small mag light (dead after a long time in the mud), a stainless fork, a Boy Scout neckerchief slide, 2 modern bullets, the end off an ear bud, part of a lock back knife, sinkers, a toasted wheatie, a wierd shaped aluminum ingot, a few tabs, melted aluminum from the campfires, a whole aluminum can and some personal tent pegs.

IMG_8157.jpeg


DSCN3008.jpeg


I have found several different shapes of the aluminum ingots here at camp. I believe they melted down aluminum cans as part of the metalwork merit badge. I’m not sure what they used as a mold.

DSCN3011.jpeg


I totaled up some of my finds from the camp out of curiosity (I keep a separate log for my camp hours, coins and pegs). Since June of 2013 I have found 48,926 coins and 19,863 camp tent pegs. (I return the pegs, they use them and lose them again and I refind them over and over again, the camp only has about 8,000 to 9,000 pegs). I didn’t keep track of the neckerchief slides in the log, but I have pictures of my finds beginning in May of 2016 and by looking through the pictures I determined I have found 330 slides, plus whatever I found from 2013 to 2016. I of course have found lots of other cool stuff there too numerous to mention. As you can see camp has been a very good place to detect.

DAY 3
I went back to the school where I found the gold ring not long ago. I am gridding sections and doing a little wandering as well. This place has been detected by at least 2 other people without permission so the finds are not as plentiful as I was hoping for.

I spent 5 hours covering a decently large grid area. Not a lot of good targets overall. But I did get a winner. All together I found 19 coins with a fence value of $1.14, a MARY GARDEN compact, a harmonica reed, copper nails, half of a roofing hatchet, an Indian head penny, a bullet, a smiley pendant, 2 modern buttons, a lead headed nail, a cheapie heart, some pieces of brass whatzit, a brass inline trap of some kind (not sure what it is from, an old engine maybe), part of an old toy gun, a few tabs, very little can slaw and a bunch of rebar stakes that had been left upright in the ground. (The rebar gives a bell tone signal for large metal close to the surface. I dig it because it may mask a better target and in this case the rebar just under the surface could be a hazard to children on the playground, so removing it was the right thing to do.)

DSCN3012.jpeg


Occasionally I find a copper nail, but they usually look different. These look like modern nails and I found a bunch of them. Normally I only find one in a hunt.

DSCN3013.jpeg


The MARY GARDEN compact was in 2 pieces about 12 feet apart. This design was first used in 1925 and went out of production in 1933. (I got lucky and found very detailed information on this brand).

DSCN3014.jpeg


The nail with the lead head looks fairly old in style. They are used to put on corrugated tin roofing. I have used the newer style myself to but a roof on my shed years ago.

DSCN3016.jpeg


The big green piece looks like an inline filter for a fuel line. Not exactly sure exactly what the fuel line was attached to, but that’s what it looks like to me. Any input would be appreciated. It is made of brass that has turned a nice shade of green, but the clay soil is kind of sticky and does not come off easily.

DSCN3017.jpeg


The Indian head penny is nicer than it looks in the pictures. I just couldn’t get the lighting right for some reason. When it popped out of the plug I could only see the green edges, but they looked so good I was sure it was better than a Lincoln cent. I rubbed at it enough to see the wreath on the back and saved the rest for home. The sticky clay just doesn’t want to come off. There is actually a good amount of detail on the coin. Too bad it is not 2 years older.

DSCN3018.jpeg


DSCN3019.jpeg


DAY 4
I went back to the newest school permission and kept checking out areas around the school. I spent 5.5 hours with the CZ21 and found 175 coins with a face value of $11.88, 3 keys, a brass trigger guard, a 1953 D wheatie, a junky piece of jewelry, a brass key tag ring, a Deadpool keychain, part of a car, a MUDD zipper pull, some tabs, aluminum bottle caps, a railroad spike, a little can slaw and the ever present school yard find, pencil ends.

DSCN3020.jpeg


The trigger guard is very a different and cool design, it looks like cast brass. It has a tab on one end that would go into the wood of the stock and be held in place by a pin. The other end is broken off and would have had a similar tab and pin hole. The whole piece has a curve to it to conform to the shape of a musket stock. It could be from as early as the late 1700s to the mid 1800s. If anyone recognizes the style of guard and can help pin done a time period it would be greatly appreciated. I can’t seem to find one like it anywhere on line.

UPDATE: I.cutter has identified it as a Lancaster style rifle trigger guard and it looks like pieces are broken off both ends. Thanks for the help.

DSCN3022.jpeg


DSCN3023.jpeg


DSCN3024.jpeg


DSCN3025.jpeg


DSCN3026.jpeg


DSCN3027.jpeg


So another week is done. Lots of clad for the yearly count and a few goodies to keep things interesting. I did a lot of digging this week and my knees are letting me know about it. Next week we have appointments, it’s going to snow again and I have a campout with the scout so I’m not sure how much I will be doing. Thanks for looking, stay safe, good luck and may your coil lead you to good things.
 

Last edited:
Upvote 15
OP
OP
tnt-hunter

tnt-hunter

Bronze Member
Apr 20, 2018
1,771
8,959
Mountain Maryland
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
9
Detector(s) used
Fisher CZ-21, Minelab Equinix 800, ,Garret AT Pro,
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting

ModernMiner

Gold Member
Jan 9, 2007
13,784
3,769
North Carolina
🥇 Banner finds
5
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
6
Detector(s) used
Tesoro Vaquero, Tesoro Silver uMax, Garrett Pro Pointer, Predator Raven & Spartan shovels, Grey Ghost headphones.
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Congrats on that trigger guard. Very cool find. :headbang:
Very nice haul. Those green IH pennies are one of my favorires.
Thanks for the post,
MM
 

pepperj

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2009
36,532
134,781
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
Deus, Deus 2, Minelab 3030, E-Trac,
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Nice going on the trigger guard.
That's one crazy amount of tent pegs.
I've dig a few on my property over the last decade.
Part of it was a scout property.
They sure liked to bury their trash. 🤣
 

OP
OP
tnt-hunter

tnt-hunter

Bronze Member
Apr 20, 2018
1,771
8,959
Mountain Maryland
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
9
Detector(s) used
Fisher CZ-21, Minelab Equinix 800, ,Garret AT Pro,
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Nice going on the trigger guard.
That's one crazy amount of tent pegs.
I've dig a few on my property over the last decade.
Part of it was a scout property.
They sure liked to bury their trash. 🤣
Thanks pepper. Back in the 60s when I was a Boy Scout we were taught to bury our trash, cans, bottles and all. That policy changed a long time ago, but the trash is still there waiting to be dug by some poor person with a metal detector. Luckily the scout camp I detect opened after the bury your trash days so I just have to go through the surface trash and stuff dropped by accident..

Thanks again, stay safe, good luck and keep swingin.
 

JB Hunts

Full Member
Dec 21, 2023
104
381
DAY 1
I found out about a park in the nearby town that I have not detected. It is very small and overgrown and hasn’t been used in years. I don’t think the park is very old, it probably had a short life.

I spent 3 hours going over every inch of available space and found 28 coins with a face value of $1.03 (lots of pennies), a round ball, an aluminum token, a sinker, an old padlock, a toy car, part of an old brass safety razor, a few tabs and some can slaw.

View attachment 2130960

The toy car is a Tootsie Toy made in Chicago. I’m not sure of the exact age, but definitely an older car. The round ball is a .69 caliber and from the location near one of the civil war camps and the caliber I’m pretty sure it is civil war. The acid soil did a real number on the aluminum token but I can see just enough to know it is a president Warren G. Harding token. There have been a number of aluminum presidential sets made over the years. This is basically trash because of the poor condition, but it is an interesting find anyway.

View attachment 2130961

I still had some time left so I went to a set of playing fields I have detected before hoping for some more goodies. I spent another 1.5 hours swingin the CZ21 and found 58 coins with a face value of $2.72, a brass whatzit, a couple of tabs and some can slaw.

View attachment 2130962

DAY 2
I had a chance to get back to the scout camp and spent 6 hours swingin the CZ21 doing a quick recheck on 2 sites I did about 4 years ago. I found 83 coins with a face value of $9.86, 39 camp tent pegs, a small mag light (dead after a long time in the mud), a stainless fork, a Boy Scout neckerchief slide, 2 modern bullets, the end off an ear bud, part of a lock back knife, sinkers, a toasted wheatie, a wierd shaped aluminum ingot, a few tabs, melted aluminum from the campfires, a whole aluminum can and some personal tent pegs.

View attachment 2130963

View attachment 2130964

I have found several different shapes of the aluminum ingots here at camp. I believe they melted down aluminum cans as part of the metalwork merit badge. I’m not sure what they used as a mold.

View attachment 2130965

I totaled up some of my finds from the camp out of curiosity (I keep a separate log for my camp hours, coins and pegs). Since June of 2013 I have found 48,926 coins and 19,863 camp tent pegs. (I return the pegs, they use them and lose them again and I refind them over and over again, the camp only has about 8,000 to 9,000 pegs). I didn’t keep track of the neckerchief slides in the log, but I have pictures of my finds beginning in May of 2016 and by looking through the pictures I determined I have found 330 slides, plus whatever I found from 2013 to 2016. I of course have found lots of other cool stuff there too numerous to mention. As you can see camp has been a very good place to detect.

DAY 3
I went back to the school where I found the gold ring not long ago. I am gridding sections and doing a little wandering as well. This place has been detected by at least 2 other people without permission so the finds are not as plentiful as I was hoping for.

I spent 5 hours covering a decently large grid area. Not a lot of good targets overall. But I did get a winner. All together I found 19 coins with a fence value of $1.14, a MARY GARDEN compact, a harmonica reed, copper nails, half of a roofing hatchet, an Indian head penny, a bullet, a smiley pendant, 2 modern buttons, a lead headed nail, a cheapie heart, some pieces of brass whatzit, a brass inline trap of some kind (not sure what it is from, an old engine maybe), part of an old toy gun, a few tabs, very little can slaw and a bunch of rebar stakes that had been left upright in the ground. (The rebar gives a bell tone signal for large metal close to the surface. I dig it because it may mask a better target and in this case the rebar just under the surface could be a hazard to children on the playground, so removing it was the right thing to do.)

View attachment 2130966

Occasionally I find a copper nail, but they usually look different. These look like modern nails and I found a bunch of them. Normally I only find one in a hunt.

View attachment 2130967

The MARY GARDEN compact was in 2 pieces about 12 feet apart. This design was first used in 1925 and went out of production in 1933. (I got lucky and found very detailed information on this brand).

View attachment 2130968

The nail with the lead head looks fairly old in style. They are used to put on corrugated tin roofing. I have used the newer style myself to but a roof on my shed years ago.

View attachment 2130969

The big green piece looks like an inline filter for a fuel line. Not exactly sure exactly what the fuel line was attached to, but that’s what it looks like to me. Any input would be appreciated. It is made of brass that has turned a nice shade of green, but the clay soil is kind of sticky and does not come off easily.

View attachment 2130970

The Indian head penny is nicer than it looks in the pictures. I just couldn’t get the lighting right for some reason. When it popped out of the plug I could only see the green edges, but they looked so good I was sure it was better than a Lincoln cent. I rubbed at it enough to see the wreath on the back and saved the rest for home. The sticky clay just doesn’t want to come off. There is actually a good amount of detail on the coin. Too bad it is not 2 years older.

View attachment 2130959

View attachment 2130971

DAY 4
I went back to the newest school permission and kept checking out areas around the school. I spent 5.5 hours with the CZ21 and found 175 coins with a face value of $11.88, 3 keys, a brass trigger guard, a 1953 D wheatie, a junky piece of jewelry, a brass key tag ring, a Deadpool keychain, part of a car, a MUDD zipper pull, some tabs, aluminum bottle caps, a railroad spike, a little can slaw and the ever present school yard find, pencil ends.

View attachment 2130972

The trigger guard is very a different and cool design, it looks like cast brass. It has a tab on one end that would go into the wood of the stock and be held in place by a pin. The other end is broken off and would have had a similar tab and pin hole. The whole piece has a curve to it to conform to the shape of a musket stock. It could be from as early as the late 1700s to the mid 1800s. If anyone recognizes the style of guard and can help pin done a time period it would be greatly appreciated. I can’t seem to find one like it anywhere on line.

UPDATE: I.cutter has identified it as a Lancaster style rifle trigger guard and it looks like pieces are broken off both ends. Thanks for the help.

View attachment 2130973

View attachment 2130974

View attachment 2130975

View attachment 2130976

View attachment 2130977

View attachment 2130978

So another week is done. Lots of clad for the yearly count and a few goodies to keep things interesting. I did a lot of digging this week and my knees are letting me know about it. Next week we have appointments, it’s going to snow again and I have a campout with the scout so I’m not sure how much I will be doing. Thanks for looking, stay safe, good luck and may your coil lead you to good things.
Way to clear out that park! Love the vintage padlock! Well done. JB
 

KaiCor

Greenie
Feb 8, 2024
11
23
Thanks pepper. Back in the 60s when I was a Boy Scout we were taught to bury our trash, cans, bottles and all. That policy changed a long time ago, but the trash is still there waiting to be dug by some poor person with a metal detector. Luckily the scout camp I detect opened after the bury your trash days so I just have to go through the surface trash and stuff dropped by accident..

Thanks again, stay safe, good luck and keep swingin.
Huh. My jar is buried on one of the beaches too 8-) Someone probably already found it with a detector, but that's something to check. There was nothing of value in it, just a note.
 

Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
19,118
33,215
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab CTX 3030; Minelab Equinox 800;
XP Deus 2
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
DAY 1
I found out about a park in the nearby town that I have not detected. It is very small and overgrown and hasn’t been used in years. I don’t think the park is very old, it probably had a short life.

I spent 3 hours going over every inch of available space and found 28 coins with a face value of $1.03 (lots of pennies), a round ball, an aluminum token, a sinker, an old padlock, a toy car, part of an old brass safety razor, a few tabs and some can slaw.

View attachment 2130960

The toy car is a Tootsie Toy made in Chicago. I’m not sure of the exact age, but definitely an older car. The round ball is a .69 caliber and from the location near one of the civil war camps and the caliber I’m pretty sure it is civil war. The acid soil did a real number on the aluminum token but I can see just enough to know it is a president Warren G. Harding token. There have been a number of aluminum presidential sets made over the years. This is basically trash because of the poor condition, but it is an interesting find anyway.

View attachment 2130961

I still had some time left so I went to a set of playing fields I have detected before hoping for some more goodies. I spent another 1.5 hours swingin the CZ21 and found 58 coins with a face value of $2.72, a brass whatzit, a couple of tabs and some can slaw.

View attachment 2130962

DAY 2
I had a chance to get back to the scout camp and spent 6 hours swingin the CZ21 doing a quick recheck on 2 sites I did about 4 years ago. I found 83 coins with a face value of $9.86, 39 camp tent pegs, a small mag light (dead after a long time in the mud), a stainless fork, a Boy Scout neckerchief slide, 2 modern bullets, the end off an ear bud, part of a lock back knife, sinkers, a toasted wheatie, a wierd shaped aluminum ingot, a few tabs, melted aluminum from the campfires, a whole aluminum can and some personal tent pegs.

View attachment 2130963

View attachment 2130964

I have found several different shapes of the aluminum ingots here at camp. I believe they melted down aluminum cans as part of the metalwork merit badge. I’m not sure what they used as a mold.

View attachment 2130965

I totaled up some of my finds from the camp out of curiosity (I keep a separate log for my camp hours, coins and pegs). Since June of 2013 I have found 48,926 coins and 19,863 camp tent pegs. (I return the pegs, they use them and lose them again and I refind them over and over again, the camp only has about 8,000 to 9,000 pegs). I didn’t keep track of the neckerchief slides in the log, but I have pictures of my finds beginning in May of 2016 and by looking through the pictures I determined I have found 330 slides, plus whatever I found from 2013 to 2016. I of course have found lots of other cool stuff there too numerous to mention. As you can see camp has been a very good place to detect.

DAY 3
I went back to the school where I found the gold ring not long ago. I am gridding sections and doing a little wandering as well. This place has been detected by at least 2 other people without permission so the finds are not as plentiful as I was hoping for.

I spent 5 hours covering a decently large grid area. Not a lot of good targets overall. But I did get a winner. All together I found 19 coins with a fence value of $1.14, a MARY GARDEN compact, a harmonica reed, copper nails, half of a roofing hatchet, an Indian head penny, a bullet, a smiley pendant, 2 modern buttons, a lead headed nail, a cheapie heart, some pieces of brass whatzit, a brass inline trap of some kind (not sure what it is from, an old engine maybe), part of an old toy gun, a few tabs, very little can slaw and a bunch of rebar stakes that had been left upright in the ground. (The rebar gives a bell tone signal for large metal close to the surface. I dig it because it may mask a better target and in this case the rebar just under the surface could be a hazard to children on the playground, so removing it was the right thing to do.)

View attachment 2130966

Occasionally I find a copper nail, but they usually look different. These look like modern nails and I found a bunch of them. Normally I only find one in a hunt.

View attachment 2130967

The MARY GARDEN compact was in 2 pieces about 12 feet apart. This design was first used in 1925 and went out of production in 1933. (I got lucky and found very detailed information on this brand).

View attachment 2130968

The nail with the lead head looks fairly old in style. They are used to put on corrugated tin roofing. I have used the newer style myself to but a roof on my shed years ago.

View attachment 2130969

The big green piece looks like an inline filter for a fuel line. Not exactly sure exactly what the fuel line was attached to, but that’s what it looks like to me. Any input would be appreciated. It is made of brass that has turned a nice shade of green, but the clay soil is kind of sticky and does not come off easily.

View attachment 2130970

The Indian head penny is nicer than it looks in the pictures. I just couldn’t get the lighting right for some reason. When it popped out of the plug I could only see the green edges, but they looked so good I was sure it was better than a Lincoln cent. I rubbed at it enough to see the wreath on the back and saved the rest for home. The sticky clay just doesn’t want to come off. There is actually a good amount of detail on the coin. Too bad it is not 2 years older.

View attachment 2130959

View attachment 2130971

DAY 4
I went back to the newest school permission and kept checking out areas around the school. I spent 5.5 hours with the CZ21 and found 175 coins with a face value of $11.88, 3 keys, a brass trigger guard, a 1953 D wheatie, a junky piece of jewelry, a brass key tag ring, a Deadpool keychain, part of a car, a MUDD zipper pull, some tabs, aluminum bottle caps, a railroad spike, a little can slaw and the ever present school yard find, pencil ends.

View attachment 2130972

The trigger guard is very a different and cool design, it looks like cast brass. It has a tab on one end that would go into the wood of the stock and be held in place by a pin. The other end is broken off and would have had a similar tab and pin hole. The whole piece has a curve to it to conform to the shape of a musket stock. It could be from as early as the late 1700s to the mid 1800s. If anyone recognizes the style of guard and can help pin done a time period it would be greatly appreciated. I can’t seem to find one like it anywhere on line.

UPDATE: I.cutter has identified it as a Lancaster style rifle trigger guard and it looks like pieces are broken off both ends. Thanks for the help.

View attachment 2130973

View attachment 2130974

View attachment 2130975

View attachment 2130976

View attachment 2130977

View attachment 2130978

So another week is done. Lots of clad for the yearly count and a few goodies to keep things interesting. I did a lot of digging this week and my knees are letting me know about it. Next week we have appointments, it’s going to snow again and I have a campout with the scout so I’m not sure how much I will be doing. Thanks for looking, stay safe, good luck and may your coil lead you to good things.
Nice!!!! Congrats!!!!!
 

l.cutler

Silver Member
Dec 2, 2006
2,648
1,949
NEPA
Detector(s) used
Tejon, Cibola, T2
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
In raw form, it costs $21.50. Let me ask you, how much would it cost in processed form? I mean cleaned and polished.
The suppliers don't sell them that way. On custom built rifles the parts are finished by the builder. Many of the parts are installed, filed and finished along with the wood for a proper fit.
 

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