War of 1812 "connections"

ECS

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...and that provides the inducement to make the rest of the narrative "believable", as any con man or forger worth his salt would employ.
 

bigscoop

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...and that provides the inducement to make the rest of the narrative "believable", as any con man or forger worth his salt would employ.

I only care about what portions I can confirm as being accurate.....:laughing7:....I could care less who provided that accurate information or the nature/uncertainty/debates over any remaining content.

PS: Did you know that the TJB of Richmond had a father? :laughing7:
 

TN_Guest1523

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Dec 27, 2014
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The death of Laffite in St Louis in 1851 comes from the "fake" memoirs by Forger John Lafflin.
Jean Lafitte was mortally wounded on his ship, GENERAL SANTANDER, February 5, 1823, when he was encountered in the Gulf of Honduros by two Spanish warships, and was buried at sea.

So, we have a Pamphlet that you say is a fictional work and now we have Memoirs that may be a clue to the Beale Papers so they must be fictional too ?
 

jhonnz41

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No, but political positions in Jackson's territorial Florida government were.
James Beverly Risqué wanted a position, hosted along with others, a banquet for Jackson in Lynchburg.
Thomas Jefferson attended along with Pascal Buford.
Risqué did not receive a position in Florida.

Is it possible to pull out the names of the people who served the war of 1812?
 

bigscoop

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There are a lot of scattered references but no actual enlistment records as many of those people were simply volunteer participants or participants in various militias, etc. Per example, you will encounter brief references or mentions of various Bedford area and Virginia residents everywhere from Texas to New Orleans and elsewhere. You'll also discover that the accuracy in the spelling of names was also rather hipshot and that there exist a great deal of confusion and uncertainty as to who is who, etc. But getting even this far requires years of research and reading because there are so many potential sources of limited information.
 

Crow

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There are a lot of scattered references but no actual enlistment records as many of those people were simply volunteer participants or participants in various militias, etc. Per example, you will encounter brief references or mentions of various Bedford area and Virginia residents everywhere from Texas to New Orleans and elsewhere. You'll also discover that the accuracy in the spelling of names was also rather hipshot and that there exist a great deal of confusion and uncertainty as to who is who, etc. But getting even this far requires years of research and reading because there are so many potential sources of limited information.

Gidday amigos

This might be of help?

When the United States declared war on Great Britain in 1812, Congress authorized the President to accept and organize volunteers in order to win the war. This database is a listing of men mustered into the armed forces between 1812 and 1815. Taken from records in the National Archives, each record includes the soldier's name, company, rank at time of induction, rank at time of discharge, and other helpful information. It provides the names of nearly 600,000 men. For researchers of early American ancestors who may have served in the military, this can be a helpful source of information.


These records were taken from Record Group 94 Records of the Adjutant General's Office, microfilm publication M602, a total of 234 rolls of film.


Each volunteer soldier has one Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) for each regiment in which he served. The CMSR contains basic information about the soldier's military career, and it is the first source the researcher should consult. The CMSR is an envelope (a jacket) containing one or more cards. These cards typically indicate that the soldier was present or absent during a certain period of time. Other cards may indicate the date of enlistment and discharge, amount of bounty paid him, and other information such as wounds received during battle or hospitalization for injury or illness.

The soldier's place of birth may be indicated; if foreign born, only the country of birth is stated. The CMSR may contain an internal jacket for so-called "personal papers" of various kinds. These may include a copy of the soldier's enlistment paper, papers relating to his capture and release as a prisoner of war, or a statement that he had no personal property with him when he died. Note, however, that the CMSR rarely indicates battles in which a soldier fought; that information must be derived from other sources.


A CMSR is as complete as the surviving records of an individual soldier or his unit. The War Department compiled the CMSRs from the original muster rolls and other records some years after the war to permit more rapid and efficient checking of military and medical records in connection with claims for pensions and other veterans' benefits.

The abstracts were so carefully prepared that it is rarely necessary to consult the original muster rolls and other records from which they were made. When the War Department created CMSRs at the turn of the century, information from company muster rolls, regimental returns, descriptive books, hospital rolls, and other records was copied verbatim onto cards.

A separate card was prepared each time an individual name appeared on a document. These cards were all numbered on the back, and these numbers were entered onto the outside jacket containing the cards. The numbers on the jacket correspond with the numbers on the cards within the jacket. These numbers were used by the War Department only for control purposes while the CMSRs were being created; the numbers do not refer to other records regarding a veteran nor are they useful for reference purposes today.




Original data: National Archives and Records Administration. Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M602, 234 rolls.

Crow
 

Crow

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Well, THAT is what we are looking for... MAYBE, James Beverly Risque.


Gidday Rebel James Beverly Risque is listed below.



Name:James B Risque
Company:2 BRIGADE (LEFTWICH'S) VIRGINIA MILITIA.
Rank - Induction:AID DE CAMP
Rank - Discharge:AID DE CAMP
Roll Box:175
Microfilm Publication:M602


Original data: National Archives and Records Administration. Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M602, 234 rolls.

Crow
 

bigscoop

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Gidday amigos

This might be of help?

When the United States declared war on Great Britain in 1812, Congress authorized the President to accept and organize volunteers in order to win the war. This database is a listing of men mustered into the armed forces between 1812 and 1815. Taken from records in the National Archives, each record includes the soldier's name, company, rank at time of induction, rank at time of discharge, and other helpful information. It provides the names of nearly 600,000 men. For researchers of early American ancestors who may have served in the military, this can be a helpful source of information.


These records were taken from Record Group 94 Records of the Adjutant General's Office, microfilm publication M602, a total of 234 rolls of film.


Each volunteer soldier has one Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) for each regiment in which he served. The CMSR contains basic information about the soldier's military career, and it is the first source the researcher should consult. The CMSR is an envelope (a jacket) containing one or more cards. These cards typically indicate that the soldier was present or absent during a certain period of time. Other cards may indicate the date of enlistment and discharge, amount of bounty paid him, and other information such as wounds received during battle or hospitalization for injury or illness.

The soldier's place of birth may be indicated; if foreign born, only the country of birth is stated. The CMSR may contain an internal jacket for so-called "personal papers" of various kinds. These may include a copy of the soldier's enlistment paper, papers relating to his capture and release as a prisoner of war, or a statement that he had no personal property with him when he died. Note, however, that the CMSR rarely indicates battles in which a soldier fought; that information must be derived from other sources.


A CMSR is as complete as the surviving records of an individual soldier or his unit. The War Department compiled the CMSRs from the original muster rolls and other records some years after the war to permit more rapid and efficient checking of military and medical records in connection with claims for pensions and other veterans' benefits.

The abstracts were so carefully prepared that it is rarely necessary to consult the original muster rolls and other records from which they were made. When the War Department created CMSRs at the turn of the century, information from company muster rolls, regimental returns, descriptive books, hospital rolls, and other records was copied verbatim onto cards.

A separate card was prepared each time an individual name appeared on a document. These cards were all numbered on the back, and these numbers were entered onto the outside jacket containing the cards. The numbers on the jacket correspond with the numbers on the cards within the jacket. These numbers were used by the War Department only for control purposes while the CMSRs were being created; the numbers do not refer to other records regarding a veteran nor are they useful for reference purposes today.




Original data: National Archives and Records Administration. Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M602, 234 rolls.

Crow

A good source, for sure, but per example, there were thousands of participants who will not appear in these records, the Battle Of New Orleans being one prime example as many of these participants were simply mustered in haste of the moment and the event. There were also thousands of unregistered participants who took part in loosely and/or rushed assemblies in a private effort. So there were thousands of unofficial participants in the War of 1812.
 

jhonnz41

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We need to accept that the beales codes are nothing but fiction....

We also need to accept that there are boulders toppled on Sharp Top mountain on July 4, 1820 that we don't know why they did that, or who removed it.
And why did James Jopling purchase the Harkening hill in 1819 from Elizabeth and Jonathan.

I don't really mind if its fiction or real. I just want some answers.

Did John Wood know Paschal Buford?
Is Paschal Buford a friend of Thomas Jefferson?
Is there a deed/purchase of Johnson-Dooley farm in that period?
Is Johnson Ancestral Home originally the cabin of Elizabeth?
Where is John Wood's home located in Peaks of Otter?
Where is the Cabin of Thomas Jefferson located?

Questions that might never have an answer...
 

jhonnz41

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How about Benjamin Wilkes and John Otey? Did they serve the war of 1812?

Do you think these people know each other?
Paschal Buford, John Wood, John Otey, Castleton Johnson, Benjamin Wilkes, James Jopling, Elizabeth Wood, Jonathan Smith, Polly Dooley.
 

bigscoop

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Things were much different back then, not near as many people and near as many people relocating from their traditional territories, so very likely that most residents either knew, or knew of, the other residents in their general vicinities. When I was about 12-13 I knew just about everyone in 10 block radius around my mid-city home, now I hardly know any of my neighbors in this much smaller community where I presently live, folks moving in and out all the time, folks with family and friends scattered all over the country and globe. Wasn't like this back in the day.
 

bigscoop

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It's all been gone through time and time again. Same old dust and dirt with zero to show for it. There's a reason why no supporting evidences in regards to the Beale Paper tale is ever discovered.....
 

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