✅ SOLVED Button identification

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I can't find anything online or in books about this button it was found where 7 TX and 9 TN cavalry was positioned any information will be greatly appreciated thanks
 

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grasshopper

Bronze Member
Aug 13, 2007
1,606
2,065
Upstate NY
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
XP Deus
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
"Treble Gilt Colour" was a generic quality designation for the gold gilt the button would have had. The fact colour is spelled as it is may give some date clues. I would guess early 1800s civilian button.
 
Upvote 2

TheCannonballGuy

Gold Member
Feb 24, 2006
6,350
12,078
Occupied CSA (Richmond VA)
Detector(s) used
White's 6000, Nautilus DMC-1, Minelab
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Grasshopper is correct. Here is more-detailed info about your button find.

Your 1-piece brass flatbutton's backmark has the British spelling of the word color as "colour"... so it was made in Britain and imported into the US.

Indented (not raised) lettering in a brass flatbutton's backmark dates it to being from about 1810 into the 1830s.

The US-versus-Britain War Of 1812 stopped importation of British-made buttons, and US customers boycotted British goods afterward until about 1820.

By about 1830, the US metal button making industry had become capable off manufacturing enough buttons to satisfy the demand for them from the clothing industry.

Therefore, combining these 4 factors indicates your button was made in the 1820s.
 
Last edited:
Upvote 5
OP
Parker572

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #4
Grasshopper is correct. Here is more-detailed info about your button find.

Your 1-piece brass flatbutton's backmark has the British spelling of the word color as "colour"... so it was made in Britain and imported into the US.

Indented (not raised) lettering in a brass flatbutton's backmark dates it to being from about 1810 into the 1830s.

The US-versus-Britain War Of 1812 stopped importation of British-made buttons, and US customers boycotted British goods afterward until about 1820.

By about 1830, the US metal button making industry had become capable off manufacturing enough buttons to satisfy the demand for them from the clothing industry.

Therefore, combining these 4 factors indicates your button was made in the 1820s.
Wow that is amazing information! How would I go about find the value? Thank you sincerely.
 
Upvote 2
OP
Parker572

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
"Treble Gilt Colour" was a generic quality designation for the gold gilt the button would have had. The fact colour is spelled as it is may give some date clues. I would guess early 1800s civilian button.
 
Upvote 1
OP
Parker572

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
"Treble Gilt Colour" was a generic quality designation for the gold gilt the button would have had. The fact colour is spelled as it is may give some date clues. I would guess early 1800s civilian button.
Thanks that is very helpful towards me learning about dating buttons 😀
 
Upvote 2
OP
Parker572

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
I am new well had a account here for a while but stumbled across it while trying to search for the button. Over the years I forgot about it and I couldn't be happier to have rediscovered it! So many people here with amazing skills and knowledge I look forward to many more post and learning opportunities. I have alot of civil war relics to share and find out what it is.
 
Upvote 2

Truth

Gold Member
Apr 13, 2016
14,306
31,964
Abita Springs La....Born in New Orleans
🥇 Banner finds
2
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
EQUINOX 800
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I am new well had a account here for a while but stumbled across it while trying to search for the button. Over the years I forgot about it and I couldn't be happier to have rediscovered it! So many people here with amazing skills and knowledge I look forward to many more post and learning opportunities. I have alot of civil war relics to share and find out what it is.
Well I can tell you you just had two of the best of the best educate you on your button believe me these guys are amazing especially these two. If I’m ever blessed to meet them they will see me on my knees bowing down at their feet….. And I’m dead serious 🇺🇸
 
Upvote 3
OP
Parker572

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #9
Well I can tell you you just had two of the best of the best educate you on your button believe me these guys are amazing especially these two. If I’m ever blessed to meet them they will see me on my knees bowing down at their feet….. And I’m dead

Well I can tell you you just had two of the best of the best educate you on your button believe me these guys are amazing especially these two. If I’m ever blessed to meet them they will see me on my knees bowing down at their feet….. And I’m dead serious 🇺🇸
I am blessed that there is people out there who is willing to give there time to educate the history and knowledge they have I feel blessed!!
 
Upvote 1

Truth

Gold Member
Apr 13, 2016
14,306
31,964
Abita Springs La....Born in New Orleans
🥇 Banner finds
2
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
EQUINOX 800
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I am blessed that there is people out there who is willing to give there time to educate the history and knowledge they have I feel blessed!!
fort I feel the exact same way they don’t even know me and I take the time out of their day just to help me and I’m telling you they have so much knowledge I soak it all in. But the keyword is blessed you’re absolutely right. Keep on saving that history 🇺🇸
 
Upvote 2

TheCannonballGuy

Gold Member
Feb 24, 2006
6,350
12,078
Occupied CSA (Richmond VA)
Detector(s) used
White's 6000, Nautilus DMC-1, Minelab
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
ft donelson tn (the button's finder) asked:
> How would I go about find the value?

As you know, the dollar-value of ANY collectible item tends to be set by three factors:
1- Rarity
2- Condition
3- Collector Demand Level (collectors' interest in buying it)

Rarity: Brass 1-piece flatbuttons are actually not very rare. It's true that they're rare in locations which didn't see much habitation prior to the mid-1800s. But at sites which do date back before 1850, we metal detectorists find these brass 1-piece flatbuttons by the hundreds. That is because nearly every civilian wore them.

Condition: A major part of their being found is such quantities is due to being darned near indestructible. Unlike hollow 2-piece brass buttons, they're hard to hurt. So, it's not at all difficult for a collector to buy one in very-good- to excellent condition.

Demand-level: Another factor in the very low "dollar value" of flatbuttons is, they were made for use on Civilian clothing. Meaning, they do not qualify as a Military collectible.

In summary:
Although they are a fully-200-years-old relic, you can buy as many flatbuttons as you want to at almost any civil war relics show for $2 to $3 apiece. (But of course, flatbuttons with a lot of gold gilt remaining will bring a somewhat higher price.)
 
Upvote 3
OP
Parker572

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #12
ft donelson tn (the button's finder) asked:
> How would I go about find the value?

As you know, the dollar-value of ANY collectible item tends to be set by three factors:
1- Rarity
2- Condition
3- Collector Demand Level (collectors' interest in buying it)

Rarity: Brass 1-piece flatbuttons are actually not very rare. It's true that they're rare in locations which didn't see much habitation prior to the mid-1800s. But at sites which do date back before 1850, we metal detectorists find these brass 1-piece flatbuttons by the hundreds. That is because nearly every civilian wore them.

Condition: A major part of their being found is such quantities is due to being darned near indestructible. Unlike hollow 2-piece brass buttons, they're hard to hurt. So, it's not at all difficult for a collector to buy one in very-good- to excellent condition.

Demand-level: Another factor in the very low "dollar value" of flatbuttons is, they were made for use on Civilian clothing. Meaning, they do not qualify as a Military collectible.

In summary:
Although they are a fully-200-years-old relic, you can buy as many flatbuttons as you want to at almost any civil war relics show for $2 to $3 apiece. (But of course, flatbuttons with a lot of gold gilt remaining will bring a somewhat higher price.)
Thank you so much I sure appreciate all that you do and the time you put in to your post I truly am blessed.
 
Upvote 2
OP
Parker572

Parker572

Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
43
100
dover, TN
Detector(s) used
Whites mxt , minelab Equinox 600
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #13
ft donelson tn (the button's finder) asked:
> How would I go about find the value?

As you know, the dollar-value of ANY collectible item tends to be set by three factors:
1- Rarity
2- Condition
3- Collector Demand Level (collectors' interest in buying it)

Rarity: Brass 1-piece flatbuttons are actually not very rare. It's true that they're rare in locations which didn't see much habitation prior to the mid-1800s. But at sites which do date back before 1850, we metal detectorists find these brass 1-piece flatbuttons by the hundreds. That is because nearly every civilian wore them.

Condition: A major part of their being found is such quantities is due to being darned near indestructible. Unlike hollow 2-piece brass buttons, they're hard to hurt. So, it's not at all difficult for a collector to buy one in very-good- to excellent condition.

Demand-level: Another factor in the very low "dollar value" of flatbuttons is, they were made for use on Civilian clothing. Meaning, they do not qualify as a Military collectible.

In summary:
Although they are a fully-200-years-old relic, you can buy as many flatbuttons as you want to at almost any civil war relics show for $2 to $3 apiece. (But of course, flatbuttons with a lot of gold gilt remaining will bring a somewhat higher price.)
Thank you very much for the information I truly can't express how much I appreciate the time and effort.
 
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