✅ SOLVED Gaming Token

pepperj

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Feb 3, 2009
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There's some information on different types.
Some claim they're a gaming token.
1788
20mm
Most of the information links on other links expired long ago.

20231129_115240.jpg
20231129_115046.jpg
 

eyemustdigtreasure

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Mar 2, 2013
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Red-Coat

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Good token. These are indeed regarded as ‘gaming tokens’ and produced as ‘replicas’ of spade guineas and half guineas in brass and pinchbeck. At 20mm yours is a half guinea (versus a guinea at 24mm) and was produced by Charles Peverelle of Birmingham. There are three recorded varieties for Peverelle (equally common). I can just make out the last part of the reverse legend (the emboldened part below):

C.H.A.R.L.E.S.P.E.V.E.R.E.L.L.E.M.A.K.E.R.B.I.R.M.

Despite the 1788 date these tokens were almost never produced in the time of George III, but are usually Victorian and occasionally Edwardian. For Peverelle, it won’t be earlier than c.1866 or later than c.1908.

Charles Peverelle set up business in Birmingham c.1866 as a ‘hardwareman’. Originally at 48 Edgbaston Street, c.1884 he moved to adjoining premises at 49 and 50 Edgbaston Street which had previously been occupied by the hardware wholesaler Lewis Peverelle (later suffixed as “… Sons & Co.”). Finally, he moved to 86 Worcester Street c;1900 and, by 1908 was succeeded by the hardware merchant Rocco Peverelle at 84 Worcester Street. The family surname may have been an anglicization of the Italian “Peverelli”.

Although ‘gaming token’ conjures up images of formal gambling establishments, these tokens were more usually for genteel parlour card games played at home. Children used them as playthings too. They also saw use in pubs and taverns where card games played for actual money were not permitted. What we call ‘turf accountants’ (bookmakers at horse racing venues) found a use for them too; they piled them on their tables as a (false) reassurance that they were carrying enough cash to pay out large wins, but without the risk of losing their money to thieves.
 

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pepperj

pepperj

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2009
37,441
138,788
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
Deus, Deus 2, Minelab 3030, E-Trac,
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Good token. These are indeed regarded as ‘gaming tokens’ and produced as ‘replicas’ of spade guineas and half guineas in brass and pinchbeck. At 20mm yours is a half guinea (versus a guinea at 24mm) and was produced by Charles Peverelle of Birmingham. There are three recorded varieties for Peverelle (equally common). I can just make out the last part of the reverse legend (the emboldened part below):

C.H.A.R.L.E.S.P.E.V.E.R.E.L.L.E.M.A.K.E.R.B.I.R.M.

Despite the 1788 date these tokens were almost never produced in the time of George III, but are usually Victorian and occasionally Edwardian. For Peverelle, it won’t be earlier than c.1866 or later than c.1908.

Charles Peverelle set up business in Birmingham c.1866 as a ‘hardwareman’. Originally at 48 Edgbaston Street, c.1884 he moved to adjoining premises at 49 and 50 Edgbaston Street which had previously been occupied by the hardware wholesaler Lewis Peverelle (later suffixed as “… Sons & Co.”). Finally, he moved to 86 Worcester Street c;1900 and, by 1908 was succeeded by the hardware merchant Rocco Peverelle at 84 Worcester Street. The family surname may have been an anglicization of the Italian “Peverelli”.

Although ‘gaming token’ conjures up images of formal gambling establishments, these tokens were more usually for genteel parlour card games played at home. Children used them as playthings too. They also saw use in pubs and taverns where card games played for actual money were not permitted. What we call ‘turf accountants’ (bookmakers at horse racing venues) found a use for them too; they piled them on their tables as a (false) reassurance that they were carrying enough cash to pay out large wins, but without the risk of losing their money to thieves.
Thanks very much on the information.
 

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