🥇 BANNER Lightning Strikes in the Lowcountry - Colonial Gold

Patriot Relics

Silver Member
Feb 6, 2014
3,709
5,587
Lowcountry, South Carolina / Richmond, Virginia
🥇 Banner finds
5
Detector(s) used
CTX-3030, Deus XP II
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
I have been metal detecting since 2013. This hobby can be an addicting one that presents ever increasing challenges to find new permissions as well the never ending pursuit of topping your last “best find”. While some chase the latest tech or shell out money for paid hunts, ultimately the only thing that matters is time spent swinging the coil. For any detectorist, finding a gold coin is a top dream…but for me my interests reside in early American colonial sites. While I would be thrilled to recovered a 19th century gold, I’ve always dreamed of finding a colonial gold coin.

While I have spent far more time swinging the CTX3030 on the coast due to its stability on the salt flat, the machine’s biggest drawback is portability. Now that the Deus 2 can handle salt water, its compact nature allows me to drag it along on trips with ease. Given I had a long layover scheduled in Charotte, I knew the timing was right to sneak back to the lowcountry for some dirt therapy. First stop was a tried and true permission that has been beaten to death over the years by my hunting buddies and I, but still yields a good 1812 or Civil War button now and then. I ran the machine in stock beach as I perfer the 24hz over 40hz max frequency to avoid small foil and lead with the 13x11 coil. A few tweaks to reactiveity and I was off swinging. First decent target rang up as a 55, nice little 1812 era US pewter cuff.

With the pressure of a skunked hunt off, I continued along bank until an crisp 83 stopped me in my tracks. My inital thought was musketball as 75 caliber’s ring in pretty consistantly 82-83 in these conditions. Not thinking much of it, I reached down, dug the plug and noticed an unfamiliar color peeking out from the pluff.

Just dug 6400R back.jpg
Just dug 6400R front.jpg


What followed was complete shock and disbelief. Staring back was a 1774 6400 Reis (4 Escudos equivilant) minted in Brazil in 1774 by the Portuguese. I steadied myself as to avoid scratching the surface and carefully rinsed away the sand and mud.

Front.jpg
Back.jpg


Over 10 years digging all matter of trash and countless hours spent researching and swinging culminating in one increadible find. This coin was minted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and predates the declaration of independence by 2 years. After 250 years in the ground, it still retains much of its original gold luster. Hard to imagine losing such a large and valuble coin as an early American colonist. As with anything in life, detecting has its highs and lows and I will be riding this high for a while. Now to set my sights on a new recovery goal…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin?

Happy hunting

www.patriotrelics.com
 

Last edited:
Upvote 162
STRANGE this find/post has not been recognized by admin or moderator as a banner find yet.

All (114) Like Like (65) Banner Find Banner Find (40) Winner Winner (7) Love Love (2
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Lots of gold on that banner, it's all good brother. Thanks to all for the votes/comments. Happy to be able to share with folks that understand how hard it is to pull this one off.

Cheers
 

I have been metal detecting since 2013. This hobby can be an addicting one that presents ever increasing challenges to find new permissions as well the never ending pursuit of topping your last “best find”. While some chase the latest tech or shell out money for paid hunts, ultimately the only thing that matters is time spent swinging the coil. For any detectorist, finding a gold coin is a top dream…but for me my interests reside in early American colonial sites. While I would be thrilled to recovered a 19th century gold, I’ve always dreamed of finding a colonial gold coin.

While I have spent far more time swinging the CTX3030 on the coast due to its stability on the salt flat, the machine’s biggest drawback is portability. Now that the Deus 2 can handle salt water, its compact nature allows me to drag it along on trips with ease. Given I had a long layover scheduled in Charotte, I knew the timing was right to sneak back to the lowcountry for some dirt therapy. First stop was a tried and true permission that has been beaten to death over the years by my hunting buddies and I, but still yields a good 1812 or Civil War button now and then. I ran the machine in stock beach as I perfer the 24hz over 40hz max frequency to avoid small foil and lead with the 13x11 coil. A few tweaks to reactiveity and I was off swinging. First decent target rang up as a 55, nice little 1812 era US pewter cuff.

With the pressure of a skunked hunt off, I continued along bank until an crisp 83 stopped me in my tracks. My inital thought was musketball as 75 caliber’s ring in pretty consistantly 82-83 in these conditions. Not thinking much of it, I reached down, dug the plug and noticed an unfamiliar color peeking out from the pluff.

View attachment 2138392View attachment 2138393

What followed was complete shock and disbelief. Staring back was a 1774 6400 Reis (4 Escudos equivilant) minted in Brazil in 1774 by the Portuguese. I steadied myself as to avoid scratching the surface and carefully rinsed away the sand and mud.

View attachment 2138394View attachment 2138396

Over 10 years digging all matter of trash and countless hours spent researching and swinging culminating in one increadible find. This coin was minted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and predates the declaration of independence by 2 years. After 250 years in the ground, it still retains much of its original gold luster. Hard to imagine losing such a large and valuble coin as an early American colonist. As with anything in life, detecting has its highs and lows and I will be riding this high for a while. Now to set my sights on a new recovery goal…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin?d

Happy hunting

www.patriotrelics.com


…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin? Not much, maybe a gold bar from the 1715 Treasure Fleet wrecks. Congrats on such a great find. Gives us all hope. Yeah, CTX was great, but heavy.
 

…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin? Not much, maybe a gold bar from the 1715 Treasure Fleet wrecks. Congrats on such a great find. Gives us all hope. Yeah, CTX was great, but heavy.
Still holding on to the mighty ctx but it gathers more dust and dirt these days
 

A stunning coin Patriot Relics! I too love finding colonial era coins and relics. This find would surpass my every detecting dream. Good for you!!!!!!
 

I have been metal detecting since 2013. This hobby can be an addicting one that presents ever increasing challenges to find new permissions as well the never ending pursuit of topping your last “best find”. While some chase the latest tech or shell out money for paid hunts, ultimately the only thing that matters is time spent swinging the coil. For any detectorist, finding a gold coin is a top dream…but for me my interests reside in early American colonial sites. While I would be thrilled to recovered a 19th century gold, I’ve always dreamed of finding a colonial gold coin.

While I have spent far more time swinging the CTX3030 on the coast due to its stability on the salt flat, the machine’s biggest drawback is portability. Now that the Deus 2 can handle salt water, its compact nature allows me to drag it along on trips with ease. Given I had a long layover scheduled in Charotte, I knew the timing was right to sneak back to the lowcountry for some dirt therapy. First stop was a tried and true permission that has been beaten to death over the years by my hunting buddies and I, but still yields a good 1812 or Civil War button now and then. I ran the machine in stock beach as I perfer the 24hz over 40hz max frequency to avoid small foil and lead with the 13x11 coil. A few tweaks to reactiveity and I was off swinging. First decent target rang up as a 55, nice little 1812 era US pewter cuff.

With the pressure of a skunked hunt off, I continued along bank until an crisp 83 stopped me in my tracks. My inital thought was musketball as 75 caliber’s ring in pretty consistantly 82-83 in these conditions. Not thinking much of it, I reached down, dug the plug and noticed an unfamiliar color peeking out from the pluff.

View attachment 2138392View attachment 2138393

What followed was complete shock and disbelief. Staring back was a 1774 6400 Reis (4 Escudos equivilant) minted in Brazil in 1774 by the Portuguese. I steadied myself as to avoid scratching the surface and carefully rinsed away the sand and mud.

View attachment 2138394View attachment 2138396

Over 10 years digging all matter of trash and countless hours spent researching and swinging culminating in one increadible find. This coin was minted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and predates the declaration of independence by 2 years. After 250 years in the ground, it still retains much of its original gold luster. Hard to imagine losing such a large and valuble coin as an early American colonist. As with anything in life, detecting has its highs and lows and I will be riding this high for a while. Now to set my sights on a new recovery goal…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin?

Happy hunting

www.patriotrelics.com
Thank goodness you were gentle with it. Folks detecting with muddy gloves make me cringe when they rub the soil off to read a date on a dug coin. Could be another nearby. Folks don’t just let gold coins fall through a hole in their pocket.
 

Thank goodness you were gentle with it. Folks detecting with muddy gloves make me cringe when they rub the soil off to read a date on a dug coin. Could be another nearby. Folks don’t just let gold coins fall through a hole in their pocket.
I had to steady myself as the excitement nearly overwhelmed logic when I saw it in the plug. Dumped my water bottle on it and fortunately most of the dirt sluffed off. Worked the area pretty extensively, but you never know what could be hiding under the next swing.
 

I have been metal detecting since 2013. This hobby can be an addicting one that presents ever increasing challenges to find new permissions as well the never ending pursuit of topping your last “best find”. While some chase the latest tech or shell out money for paid hunts, ultimately the only thing that matters is time spent swinging the coil. For any detectorist, finding a gold coin is a top dream…but for me my interests reside in early American colonial sites. While I would be thrilled to recovered a 19th century gold, I’ve always dreamed of finding a colonial gold coin.

While I have spent far more time swinging the CTX3030 on the coast due to its stability on the salt flat, the machine’s biggest drawback is portability. Now that the Deus 2 can handle salt water, its compact nature allows me to drag it along on trips with ease. Given I had a long layover scheduled in Charotte, I knew the timing was right to sneak back to the lowcountry for some dirt therapy. First stop was a tried and true permission that has been beaten to death over the years by my hunting buddies and I, but still yields a good 1812 or Civil War button now and then. I ran the machine in stock beach as I perfer the 24hz over 40hz max frequency to avoid small foil and lead with the 13x11 coil. A few tweaks to reactiveity and I was off swinging. First decent target rang up as a 55, nice little 1812 era US pewter cuff.

With the pressure of a skunked hunt off, I continued along bank until an crisp 83 stopped me in my tracks. My inital thought was musketball as 75 caliber’s ring in pretty consistantly 82-83 in these conditions. Not thinking much of it, I reached down, dug the plug and noticed an unfamiliar color peeking out from the pluff.

View attachment 2138392View attachment 2138393

What followed was complete shock and disbelief. Staring back was a 1774 6400 Reis (4 Escudos equivilant) minted in Brazil in 1774 by the Portuguese. I steadied myself as to avoid scratching the surface and carefully rinsed away the sand and mud.

View attachment 2138394View attachment 2138396

Over 10 years digging all matter of trash and countless hours spent researching and swinging culminating in one increadible find. This coin was minted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and predates the declaration of independence by 2 years. After 250 years in the ground, it still retains much of its original gold luster. Hard to imagine losing such a large and valuble coin as an early American colonist. As with anything in life, detecting has its highs and lows and I will be riding this high for a while. Now to set my sights on a new recovery goal…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin?

Happy hunting

www.patriotrelics.com
Absolutely beautiful - that glint of gold must be amazing to see
 

I have been metal detecting since 2013. This hobby can be an addicting one that presents ever increasing challenges to find new permissions as well the never ending pursuit of topping your last “best find”. While some chase the latest tech or shell out money for paid hunts, ultimately the only thing that matters is time spent swinging the coil. For any detectorist, finding a gold coin is a top dream…but for me my interests reside in early American colonial sites. While I would be thrilled to recovered a 19th century gold, I’ve always dreamed of finding a colonial gold coin.

While I have spent far more time swinging the CTX3030 on the coast due to its stability on the salt flat, the machine’s biggest drawback is portability. Now that the Deus 2 can handle salt water, its compact nature allows me to drag it along on trips with ease. Given I had a long layover scheduled in Charotte, I knew the timing was right to sneak back to the lowcountry for some dirt therapy. First stop was a tried and true permission that has been beaten to death over the years by my hunting buddies and I, but still yields a good 1812 or Civil War button now and then. I ran the machine in stock beach as I perfer the 24hz over 40hz max frequency to avoid small foil and lead with the 13x11 coil. A few tweaks to reactiveity and I was off swinging. First decent target rang up as a 55, nice little 1812 era US pewter cuff.

With the pressure of a skunked hunt off, I continued along bank until an crisp 83 stopped me in my tracks. My inital thought was musketball as 75 caliber’s ring in pretty consistantly 82-83 in these conditions. Not thinking much of it, I reached down, dug the plug and noticed an unfamiliar color peeking out from the pluff.

View attachment 2138392View attachment 2138393

What followed was complete shock and disbelief. Staring back was a 1774 6400 Reis (4 Escudos equivilant) minted in Brazil in 1774 by the Portuguese. I steadied myself as to avoid scratching the surface and carefully rinsed away the sand and mud.

View attachment 2138394View attachment 2138396

Over 10 years digging all matter of trash and countless hours spent researching and swinging culminating in one increadible find. This coin was minted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and predates the declaration of independence by 2 years. After 250 years in the ground, it still retains much of its original gold luster. Hard to imagine losing such a large and valuble coin as an early American colonist. As with anything in life, detecting has its highs and lows and I will be riding this high for a while. Now to set my sights on a new recovery goal…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin?

Happy hunting

www.patriotrelics.com
Over 30 years swinging, beach undersea and in the hills. Founds lots of cool things, never a gold coin. Still have that to look forward to. Inspiring to see your find! Congrats and thanks for posting!!
 

An extreme and beautiful find. Looking at your site and reading of past finds I can see the work you put into the hobby. The history of your finds has to make one wonder; what was happening when an item was lost, who was present then? A lot of work and research on your part and it has paid off well.
 

BANNER FIND FOR SURE CONGRATULATIONS
 

I have been metal detecting since 2013. This hobby can be an addicting one that presents ever increasing challenges to find new permissions as well the never ending pursuit of topping your last “best find”. While some chase the latest tech or shell out money for paid hunts, ultimately the only thing that matters is time spent swinging the coil. For any detectorist, finding a gold coin is a top dream…but for me my interests reside in early American colonial sites. While I would be thrilled to recovered a 19th century gold, I’ve always dreamed of finding a colonial gold coin.

While I have spent far more time swinging the CTX3030 on the coast due to its stability on the salt flat, the machine’s biggest drawback is portability. Now that the Deus 2 can handle salt water, its compact nature allows me to drag it along on trips with ease. Given I had a long layover scheduled in Charotte, I knew the timing was right to sneak back to the lowcountry for some dirt therapy. First stop was a tried and true permission that has been beaten to death over the years by my hunting buddies and I, but still yields a good 1812 or Civil War button now and then. I ran the machine in stock beach as I perfer the 24hz over 40hz max frequency to avoid small foil and lead with the 13x11 coil. A few tweaks to reactiveity and I was off swinging. First decent target rang up as a 55, nice little 1812 era US pewter cuff.

With the pressure of a skunked hunt off, I continued along bank until an crisp 83 stopped me in my tracks. My inital thought was musketball as 75 caliber’s ring in pretty consistantly 82-83 in these conditions. Not thinking much of it, I reached down, dug the plug and noticed an unfamiliar color peeking out from the pluff.

View attachment 2138392View attachment 2138393

What followed was complete shock and disbelief. Staring back was a 1774 6400 Reis (4 Escudos equivilant) minted in Brazil in 1774 by the Portuguese. I steadied myself as to avoid scratching the surface and carefully rinsed away the sand and mud.

View attachment 2138394View attachment 2138396

Over 10 years digging all matter of trash and countless hours spent researching and swinging culminating in one increadible find. This coin was minted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and predates the declaration of independence by 2 years. After 250 years in the ground, it still retains much of its original gold luster. Hard to imagine losing such a large and valuble coin as an early American colonist. As with anything in life, detecting has its highs and lows and I will be riding this high for a while. Now to set my sights on a new recovery goal…but what is better than an 18th century gold coin?

Happy hunting

www.patriotrelics.com
I'm late to the party but that is surely a lifetime's greatest find- Major props!!
 

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