Mr.Waffles

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Mar 27, 2015
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Last year I visited a known, but not very popular, Pueblo site. This area of the state is littered with ruins like these (all of which are accessible without permits because it is on government land) but it requires lots of 4 wheel driving and very strenuous hiking. Because they are so hard to reach, they tend to see very few visitors and are forgotten by most. To get to these we had to hike along the cliff side and behind a waterfall. :P But it was all well worth it. These ruins have not been maintained since their previous tenants vacated the area 800 years ago and are left as is all year around. Some of the buildings that are still entirely intact (wooden floors and all) are about 3-4 stories high. We took plenty of pics but nothing else. I thought ya'll might appreciate the pics. I would have posted more but I didn't want to use any with people's faces in them. Sorry.

The 5th pic shows the "trail" we used to get there.and for anyone who enjoys pottery, there were literally thousands of sherds! The last pic shows one the taller buildings that's still entirely intact with my friend in it for scale.


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Thanks for looking, everyone.
 

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Mark Todd

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Apr 22, 2014
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Like seeing different stuff from different places, thanks! Funny thing is some of those structures were built better than many are today!
 

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Mr.Waffles

Mr.Waffles

Full Member
Mar 27, 2015
127
193
South West
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
That's really cool ....looks like a great time. If I ever make it out that way I would love to explore

There's a lot of native american history all through Arizona. In fact, many of the canal systems that we use in Phoenix to transport water today are the exact same canals that the ancient Hohokam built centuries ago. We've just improved them...a lot. For the North American history buff, it can be quite the treasure trove. :)
 

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