🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Object ID + Anchor ID

Mat961

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Mar 11, 2017
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Hi Guys, could you please help me id the object in the photo, I'm not sure if it is a cannon, also would like to know more about the anchor. thanks in advance
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Solution
The photos show the pretty-much-flat end of a cylindrical object. If it is the breech end of a cannon, where is the cascabel, or other projection for attachment? The edge of the flat bottom appears to turn at a sharp 90-degree angle... like the cut end of a sawed log. I've never seen a "Historical" cannon whose base/breech had that shape.

Also, as AARC already astutely noted, the object has no trunnions... which are a prominent feature on most Historical muzzle-loading cannons.

In the diagram below, the circle marked "d" is the trunnion on the cannon's right side. Also, note that the cannon's breech end has a rounded edge.

Of course, the object is covered with concretion, and the photo is a bit out of focus, due to some...

ARC

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Not sure what that is... it has the overall shape and bore of a cannon... yet no trunnions...

This does not disqualify it from being a type of cannon.... just would not be very old... err old as in Spanish Galleon old rather,
 
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ARC

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Oh and the anchor is that of a style of Admiralty anchor... again more vintage than really old.
 
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TheCannonballGuy

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The photos show the pretty-much-flat end of a cylindrical object. If it is the breech end of a cannon, where is the cascabel, or other projection for attachment? The edge of the flat bottom appears to turn at a sharp 90-degree angle... like the cut end of a sawed log. I've never seen a "Historical" cannon whose base/breech had that shape.

Also, as ARC already astutely noted, the object has no trunnions... which are a prominent feature on most Historical muzzle-loading cannons.

In the diagram below, the circle marked "d" is the trunnion on the cannon's right side. Also, note that the cannon's breech end has a rounded edge.

Of course, the object is covered with concretion, and the photo is a bit out of focus, due to some cloudiness in the water. You might want to take a hammer with you when you go back to the spot, and see what chipping off some concretion might reveal.
 

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Mat961

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Mar 11, 2017
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Primary Interest:
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The photos show the pretty-much-flat end of a cylindrical object. If it is the breech end of a cannon, where is the cascabel, or other projection for attachment? The edge of the flat bottom appears to turn at a sharp 90-degree angle... like the cut end of a sawed log. I've never seen a "Historical" cannon whose base/breech had that shape.

Also, as AARC already astutely noted, the object has no trunnions... which are a prominent feature on most Historical muzzle-loading cannons.

In the diagram below, the circle marked "d" is the trunnion on the cannon's right side. Also, note that the cannon's breech end has a rounded edge.

Of course, the object is covered with concretion, and the photo is a bit out of focus, due to some cloudiness in the water. You might want to take a hammer with you when you go back to the spot, and see what chipping off some concretion might reveal.
Thanks for you and Arc for the info and fast reply...i forgot to include some information that might be helpful :
1.there are 3 of these object
2. their size is not the same.
3.one of these objects has a rope attached to it, i cant tell if it was an attempt to remove from water, the rope looks pretty old because of the accumulation of shells.
3.these object are located at 12m depth and they are pretty close to the shore( about 1 km)
 
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